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Addresses and public lectures

Dr. Glass was much sought after as a public lecturer and gave freely of his time. Most of the addresses relate to his professional work, but he also took time to share his private passions, especially the utilization of geothermal energy and his research on the Jews in China. The last arose from his invitations to visit China in 1980 and 1985, where he was awarded an honorary professorship from the prestigious Nanjing Aeronautical Institute.

The files contain drafts of addresses, covering correspondence, notes, programs, press coverage, photoprints and slides.

Manuscripts and publications

This series contains manuscripts and the occasional offprint of book reviews, articles, chapters of books, and books written by Dr. Glass. There is also covering correspondence, contracts, notes, reviews, and photoprints tipped in with the manuscripts. The arrangement is chronological.

This series is very incomplete; it contains material on only about 50 of the approximately 200 publications written or co-authored by Dr. Glass. There are no manuscripts or publications, for example, for the years 1954, 1960, 1963-1966, 1969, 1973, 1984, and 1987, and the years represented are not always complete. For some of the publications, there is only covering correspondence; for others, the manuscript is incomplete; and for a few, there is only an offprint.

Graphic material

This series consists of photoprints, photonegatives, and slides assembled by Dr. Glass in the course of his research, teaching duties, his writing, and for his public addresses and lectures, which are not specifically connected to manuscript material in other series.

The arrangement of the photographs and negatives is generally by topic. There is a representative sampling of images from the Institute for Aerospace Studies, of Dr. Glass' involvement with Avro Corporation and with NASA, and of various aspects of his research.

A number of the slides relate to unidentified lectures. The remainder is arranged by topic, generally in alphabetical order.

Boxes B1994/0033/003P, 009P, and 010P contain material that largely, or in part, belongs to series 9.

Correspondence

This series contains Dr. Glass' extensive correspondence files on a wide variety of personal and professional issues. The arrangement by broad topics (consulting, 1955-1982; "personal" correspondence from his office, 1950-1969), then general correspondence, filed chronologically (1959-1987), and finally by alphabetically by name of organization for the files relating to Dr. Glass' involvement in Jewish issues.

The last category begins with files on Canada-Israel cultural exchange, including the work of the Canada-Israel Chamber of Commerce and Industry (1972-1981). These are followed by files of the University of Toronto chapter of Canadian Professors for Peace in the Middle East (1974-1987), but the greatest volume relates to the conditions of Jews in the Soviet Union. Much of the work on this issue was done through the Canadian Academic Committee for Soviet Jewry and the Committee of Concerned Scientists, including its Canadian branch. Of particular concern was the treatment of the scientist, Benjamin Levich, in whose honour conferences were organized. Dr. Glass played a very active role in these events.

The files on Jewish issues contain, in addition to letters, press coverage, notes, memoranda, and minutes.

Sabbatical leave and trips

Dr. Glass was granted sabbatical leave in 1957-1958, 1970-1971, and 1974-1975. His first leave was spent in England, primarily at the Imperial College of Science and Technology in London. His proposed sabbatical leave for 1966-1967 had to be postponed and he took it in 1970-1971. He arranged a global trip, which took him to the 8th International Shock Tube Symposium in London and the International Symposium on the Dynamics of Ionized Gases in Tokyo.

In 1972 he began planning for his next sabbatical. It began in England, and continued through France, the Netherlands, Belgium, and Denmark. As his book, Shock Waves and Man, had recently appeared, he was much in demand both in academic and research (both military and civilian) circles as a speaker. He then went on to Israel, Iran, India, Thailand, Hong Kong, and Japan. While in Japan as a visiting professor, he attended the 10th International Shock Tube Symposium. He returned to Toronto via Hawaii, San Francisco and Chicago, giving lectures and seminars as he went.

In addition to his sabbatical leaves, Dr. Glass travelled widely. His first major trip was to the USSR in 1961, with a side vacation to Israel. In 1963, he visited a number of universities in the mid and western United States. In 1965, he was back in Europe attending the VII Symposium on Advanced Problems and Methods in Fluid Dynamics in Poland. In 1980, he made another tour of the Far East, visiting China as a guest of the Academy of Sciences, and then going on to Japan. In 1985, he made a return visit, receiving an "honorary professoriate" from the Nanjing Aeronautical Institute.

The files contain correspondence, calendars and diaries, notes, research notes, conference programs, abstracts, drafts of lectures and addresses, and photoprints. There is extensive material on the symposia mentioned above.

Professional associations and conferences

Dr. Glass belonged to many professional associations, in some of which he played a very active role. He was also much in demand as an adviser to and participant in conferences in his areas of specialization. This series reflects his involvement in these areas; additional information may also be found in the addresses in series 10.

There are extensive files are on the fluid dynamics divisions of the American Physical Society and NASA, on the aerodynamics committee of the National Research Council of Canada, and on the geothermal energy study of the Science Council of Canada, which Dr. Glass headed. The conferences represented are mostly international ones on gasdynamics and shock tubes. Dr. Glass also sat on a number of editorial boards and was the founder of the journal, Shock Waves.

The material in this series includes correspondence, programs, minutes, reports, lecture notes, addresses, press clippings, and photographs.

Personal files

This series contains biographical sketches compiled for internal University of Toronto purposes and for several biographical dictionaries (ca. 1960-1992), including a selection of photographs; a personal data file compiled by Professor Glass in July, 1986; certificates and diplomas for academic and honorary degrees and other awards (1947-1986); and press clippings (1977-1985).

Correspondence

Dr. Glass was a prolific letter writer and this series represents only a small portion of his total output. The remainder will be found in accession B94-0033. There are two "personal correspondence files" from his office, covering the years 1964-1966 and 1968-1971. The remaining eight files contain extensive personal correspondence for the months of April, 1981 to mid-July, 1982, and October, 1987 through October, 1988, witha few letters for 1983, 1985 and 1993.

The "personal correspondence files" from his office encompass the personal side of his professional work, such as invitations to conferences and speaking engagements, references, and internal reports and meetings.

The personal correspondence for 1981-1982 relates primarily to Dr. Glass being appointed a University Professor, to his part in the campaign on behalf of Andrei Sakharov and other Soviet refusniks and dissidents, to exchange programs between the University of Toronto and other universities, and to conferences. The files for 1987 and 1988 contain much correspondence by the Committee of Concerned Scientists on the extradition of Nazi war criminals, particularly Alois Brunner, and on the campaign to allow Soviet Jewish refusniks to emigrate. Most of the remaining letters are devoted to a discussion to Professor Glass's ongoing research and writings and to his interest in Jews in China.

The arrangement is chronological.

Organizations and conferences

Dr. Glass belonged to many professional associations, and was in wide demand at conferences. He also, as already has been noted, was deeply involved in a number of organizations devoted to various causes on behalf of Jewish peoples. The activities of both groups overlapped, especially on the issue of scientific freedom.

The organizations represented here are the Committee on Scientific Freedom and Responsibility of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (1980-1981), the Canadian Committee of Scientists and Scholars (1980-1981), the Commission on Post-Secondary Education in Ontario (1971), the Committee of Concerned Scientists (1980-1986), the 2nd International Colloquium on Gasdynamics of Explosions held in Novosibirisk, USSR, in 1969 (1966-1972), the International Conference in Honour of Andrei Sakharov (1981), the 15th International Congress of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics held at the University of Toronto in 1980 (1979-1980), the Sino-Judaic Institute (1981-1990), and the University of Toronto protest regarding anti-Semitism in the USSR (1976-1978).

The organization files contain primarily correspondence, with some background and other reports, programs, notes, manuscripts and press clippings. The conference files also contain some addresses.

The arrangement is alphabetical.

Research files (general)

This series consists of the general files that Mr. Grenville assembled in his attempt to write Dr. Solandt’s story. It begins with a variety of biographical information on Dr. Solandt, including curriculum vitae, tributes and obituaries, his memorial service, press clippings, and an article about him. This is followed by grant applications, a project outline, correspondence, and files on sources, family history, and Dr. Solandt’s activities (including summaries of diaries), arranged alphabetically. The principal areas of activity covered are the atomic bomb/nuclear weapons, Canadian National Railway, Defence Research Board, forestry, medical research, operational research, the Science Council of Canada, and ‘voyaguers’. The photographs associated with some of the files have been removed and stored separately.

Photographs

The photographs in this series document portions of Dr. Solandt’s life. There are a half dozen spanning the years 1949 to 1978, and there is one studio photograph of Andrew Lawrence (Laurie) Chute, a former fellow medical student at the University of Toronto and colleague in wartime Britain. There are two folders of colour photoprints by David Grenville of Dr. Solandt at his residence, the Wolfe Den, near Bolton, Ontario and of his last visit in August1986 to his ancestral haunts at Inverness, Megantic County, in the Eastern Townships of Quebec.

Textual records and photographs

This series contains course notes, correspondence, addresses, articles, manuscripts, notes, minutes, and photographs relating to the activities of Thom Greenfield as a professor of educational administration at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education and as a gay activist, especially in relation to "Gay Fathers of Toronto", of which he was one of the founders.

Photographs

Formal portraits, publicity prints and snapshots documenting Professor Guillet’s research. In particular there are prints showing Professor Guillet in his lab with Arthur Stein and Andjelka Lavoie, working with the molecular probe apparatus in 1969. This probe was used to study the glass transition of polypropylene.

Personal and biographical

Series consists of textual records and graphic material documenting Ian Hacking’s personal life and career, with eight files related to the histories of both the Hacking and MacDougall families. Records include a passport, birth and marriage certificates, family snapshots, drawings by his children, as well as correspondence detailing financial contributions made to various charities and initiatives. Ian Hacking’s professional and academic activity is reflected in written and photographic documentation of awards and honours received, including the Killam Prize for the Humanities, the Companion to the Order of Canada, and the Holberg International Memorial Prize. Also included in the series is an autobiographical document written by Dr. Hacking detailing the orientation of his research.

Research and Publications

The series partially documents Francess Halpenny’s research and publishing activities relating to publishing generally, Canadian libraries, Canadian theatre and Royal Society of Canada fellows, from 1969 to 1996. The series also partially documents her participation into activities of the Literary History of Canada’s editorial board from 1984 to 1990.

The series consists of 8 files including working notes, drafts (some hand written), correspondence, minutes of meetings, grant application and reviews.

Theatre

The series partially documents Francess Halpenny’s involvement as a performer in theatre productions with the Village Players company, later the New Play Society, from 1939 to 1947. It also partially documents her involvement as a performer, director and/or author with the University Alumnae Dramatic Club, later the Alumnae Theatre, from 1946 to 1993, including the first time played in Canada production of Samuel Beckett’s "Waiting for Godot" in 1958. Most of the 1940s and 1950s productions of the University Alumnae Dramatic Club were also performed during Central Ontario region and/or national edition of the Dominion Drama Festival.

The series consists of 52 files including programmes, press clippings, correspondence, drafts and annotated scripts. It also includes a souvenir book of the 1st Stratford Festival ; Halpenny’s article about the history of the University Alumnae Dramatic Club, published in the Graduate, 1968 ; a program for the tribute to Dora Mavor Moore at the St. Lawrence Centre, 30 November 1971 ; and an Exhibition catalogues for the exhibit "Dramatis Personae: An Exhibition of Amateur Theatre at the University of Toronto", presented at the University of Toronto Archives in 1986 and 1992. The series also includes photographs of play scenes ; a studio portrait of Halpenny in costume for Mistress Quickly in "Henry V" production, by J. Roy Kemp, 1941 ; a photograph of Marion Jones, Francess Halpenny, Herbert Wittaker, Ruth Norris and John Colicos when being attributed the award for the best play at the Central Ontario Drama Festival, 1951 ; a photograph of L. C. Tobias presenting the best supporting actor award to Francess Halpenny for her contribution in the play "Uncle Vanya", 1955.

Honours and Awards

The series documents the honours and awards received by Francess Halpenny during her career. It also documents the lectures and seminars she gave as Distinguished Visitor at the University of Alberta in 1989.

The series consists of 20 files including correspondence, ceremony proceedings, diplomas, convocation addresses, personal notes and press clippings. The series also contains 92 photographs of Halpenny taken during various convocation ceremonies or with dignitaries.

Royal Canadian Air Force. Women's Division

The series partially documents Francess Halpenny’s activities with the Women’s Division of the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) as a meteorological observer in Torbay (Newfoundland) in 1943 and 1944, and in Summerside (Prince Edward Island) in 1945. It also partially documents her contribution to the RCAF publication, "Wings Overseas", in 1943 and 1944.

The series consists of 4 files including registration certificates, a library card, personal notes about the life at Torbay, correspondence and copies of "Wings Overseas" and "Summerside" publications. It also includes one copy of publication "Per Ardua: A pictorial History of the RCAF, Torbay 1944" ; a photograph of Halpenny’s class at the weather course for airwomen, RCAF, Toronto, Ontario, December 1942 ; Halpenny’s badges and insignia, [1943-1945] ; and a thank you note received from Theodore L. Wiacek family, after his death in 1998.

Royal Society of Canada

The series partially documents Francess Halpenny’s participation into activities of the Royal Society of Canada, from 1982 to 1991. It partially documents her participation to the Royal Society of Canada centennial celebrations, in 1982 ; her involvement as a member and president of the Academy of Humanities and Social Sciences Council, also called Council Academy II, from 1982 to 1988. The series also partially document Halpenny’s involvement in promoting women’s place in scholarship by participating into activities of the Affirmative Action Committee in 1988 and 1989 ; by giving lectures and talks about women in scholarship during a tour of the Maritimes in 1990 ; by participating in the discussion “Women in scholarship : One step forward, two steps back?” at the Society’s annual meeting in Victoria (British Columbia), in 1990 ; and by participating into the conception of the booklet "Claiming the Future".

The series consists of 10 files including minutes of meetings, personal notes, drafts of reports, correspondence, press releases and press clippings. The series also includes 2 photographs of Dr. Halpenny taken during the Society’s annual meeting in Winnipeg, 1986 ; one photograph with Professor Laurent Dennis during a reception at the Faculty of Library and Information Science reception in honour of her election to the Royal Society of Canada.

Lectures

This series consists of lecture files used by Harris for teaching mainly undergraduate English courses. There is a file for Course 316 on Higher Education taught in the mid 1960s. Among the files on a course of History and theory of English Studies (1984) is a manuscript of paper entitled “The role of English in general education 1890-1950” written by Harris while as a Ph.D. student in 1951 at the University of Michigan.(B2002-0003/002(09) Files contain hand written and typed notes, some outlines to lectures, clippings and essays related to the lecture topic. These files more than likely began as notes Harris took while a student of English at the University of Toronto during the 1940s and formed the basis of his early lectures. Overtime Harris added to the files and they clearly became his teaching lectures.
Lectures relating to period literature are filed first (19th century poetry, 20th century prose), followed by types of literature (i.e. poetry, tragedies, the novel, the theatre) and finally followed by files on individual authors arranged alphabetically.

Of a more ambiguous nature are files on philosophy, which may or may not have been used for teaching. They are filed after the English Literature files and are followed by the one file on a course in Higher Education mentioned above.

Also includes slides used to illustrate a lecture on the past deans of the School of Graduate Studies, given at the University of Toronto on November 18, 1986; copy of text in case file.

Addresses, manuscripts and publications

At convocations, seminars and conferences, Professor Harris spoke on topics relating to university affairs and the study of higher education. This series contains original and copies of his addresses, lectures, notes, and papers that he presented at academic events as well as undated typescripts, correspondence, manuscripts. His research material for the Graduate Studies Lecture Series contain information relating to prominent academic staff, namely, J.C. McLennan, J.P. MacMurrich, A.B. Macallum, Andrew Hunter, Harold Innis, George Sidney Brett and Andrew Gordon.

Articles and reviews written by Professor Harris, programmes of events he attended, and sample invitation cards issued by him as Principal of Innis College form part of a scrapbook, which also has an original photo of Professor Harris with unidentified group.

Photoprints

Three black and white prints of Hartle standing in front of the sign for the Institute of Policy Analysis.

Elgin Rowland Hastings

This series is comprised almost wholly of material assembled by Elgin Hastings while a student in the then new five-year Bachelor of Medicine program at the University of Toronto between 1908 and 1913. The records consist primarily of a comprehensive collection of course notes, laboratory notes and drawings. Hastings kept detailed notes, dated his notebooks and many of the lectures and exercises, and often recorded the name of the professor or tutor teaching the course. He also preserved a list of all the courses for which he had registered at the beginning of each academic year and the professors who taught them. He did, however, take some additional courses that were not listed; one example is a course in psychiatry taught by Ernest Jones during the Easter term 1912. The course notes are arranged by academic year and alphabetically by name of course within each year.

The series also contains certificates relating to Hastings’ medical education and professional certification, a student handbook, memorabilia of his extra-curricular activities, photographs of some of his classmates, photographs including family members and the graduating Class of 1913 (Medicine), and a transcript of the evidence given in a court case in 1914 (two pages of Hastings’ evidence have been torn out).

Helen Mary Ferguson Hastings

This small series documents her education and her teaching experience up to the time of her marriage. There are several files of letters, mostly from family members, received at the time of and shortly after her marriage; and later correspondence with Elgin, her mother, various relatives and friends and Ulrike Dobe, her future daughter-in-law. There is also a file of correspondence with her sister, Bessie, during the last years of the latter’s life, along with a copy of her will, and correspondence regarding her estate. This is followed by a file of letters to her sister-in-law, Louise Hastings, written in 1959. Other files contain memorabilia and activities with the Women’s Canadian Club of Toronto. Finally, there is a photograph of John Andrew Duff and classmates in civil engineering, School of Practical Science, taken about 1887. Duff was an uncle (his sister, Mary, was Helen’s mother) who received his BA from University College in 1887. In the fall of that year he entered civil engineering at the School of Practical Science, where he was registered for one year.

Personal files

This series contains material documenting the personal side of Dr. Hastings’ life. It begins with genealogical and biographical information about and articles regarding Hastings and his family, followed by copies of his curriculum vitae (1961-1994). Other items include his baby book (1928), membership cards and memorabilia, and miscellaneous writings. There is a file of badges and certificates from the Royal Life Saving Society and files on awards and honours, in particular from the Pan American Health Organization, the University of Toronto alumni, and the Canadian Public Health Association. There are several files on trips, beginning when Hastings was a teenager, and on the deaths of his parents.

The larger part of this series consists of daybooks documenting Dr. Hastings’ activities between 1955 and 1967. These take the form of quarterly volumes, a few of which are missing. There are also a number of casual and formal photographs of Dr. Hastings and slides of his father’s funeral. The arrangement of the daybooks and the photographs is chronological.

An electronic version of Dr. Hastings' CV is attached (in pdf)

Education

John Hastings began his education at the Normal Model School in Toronto in 1933, went on to the University of Toronto Schools in 1939, and from there into the pre-medicine program at the University of Toronto in 1945. He received his MD in 1951, then did post-graduate work in the School of Hygiene, receiving his diploma in 1954.

This series documents Hastings’ progress through the educational system and the development of his academic and non-curricular activities. The files on the Normal Model School contain certificates, class assignments, press clippings, drafts of two plays that Hastings wrote, and the school badge. Hastings’ interests in drama were carried over to the University of Toronto Schools, where he wrote a number of plays, drafts of which have survived in this series, and one of which was published in its yearbook, the Twig, in 1943. At UTS, he also honed his public speaking and debating skills; the predominant themes of his public addresses being democracy, the British Empire and World War II. Hastings was a reporter to the Twig for his form and editor in 1943-1944 (his editorial files have survived). He was also a member of the school band and the cadets, developed an early interest in politics and became an active member of the young Progressive Conservatives. At the same time he maintained a high academic standing.

In 1944 Hastings entered a world-wide essay competition sponsored by the Royal Empire Society. His entry was one of three to receive a prize. This encouraged him to enter other essay contests while a pre-medical student at the University of Toronto (1945-1947). At the U of T, he was a member of the Hart House Debates Committee from 1949 to 1951; his notes reveal something of the parry and thrust of debating at that time. Among other activities, Hastings was a member of the Board of Stewards of Hart House and the U of T Historical Club and in 1948 he participated in the Mock Parliament. The remainder of this series contains notes, correspondence, certificates, and photographs relating to Hastings’ acquisition of his medical degree and his post-graduate diploma in public health.

A listing of his activities, academic and otherwise, while a student is found in B2002-0014/014(09).

Correspondence

This series includes some professional correspondence but much of it consists of letters to and from Dr. Hastings’ parents, his grandmother, his aunts, Bessie Ferguson, Betty Graham and Louise Hastings, and other relatives and friends met over a lifetime of public service and devotion to his church. The last influenced many of his interests outside his academic and administrative work at University of Toronto, and is reflected in thirty years of correspondence arising from visits to India and Japan beginning in the early 1950s.

While most of the correspondence is filed chronologically, the first files contain exchanges of letters with the Drever family (especially Michael Drever), the politician Eugene Forsey, and the relatives mentioned above. Dr. Hastings met the Drevers from Montevideo, Uruguay, in 1959, when he went on a tour of Latin America to observe preventive medicine and public health teaching. He was to return to Uruguay at the end of 1964 as a member of the World Health Organization/Pan American Health Organization program on health planning in Latin America that also entailed visits to Chile and Argentina (he had a regular correspondent from Santiago after that date).

Dr. Hastings first went to India in 1953 as the University of Toronto’s representative to the World University Service International Seminar (the files for which are in Series 5). While there he first visited the Christian Medical College and Hospital in Vellore, near Madras, that received support from the Canadian Council of Churches through its Vellore/Ludhiana Committee, of which he was a member from 1962 to 1975 and to which he was an advisor from 1975 to 1981. Over the years Dr. Hasting was to provide financial support to many young people he met in India, helping some with their education overseas and others to immigrate to Canada. In 1955 he had the opportunity to go abroad again, this time as a faculty member of the WUS International Seminar, Japan, followed by a month for studying medical education and medical care in that country. He wrote a widely praised report on his return, and kept up a voluminous correspondence with many of the people he had met. In later years Dr. Hastings came to regard these two visits as seminal events in his life.

The first files of chronological correspondence is primarily with his parents, consisting largely of letters sent and received while at Camp Kagawong on Balsam Lake near Fenelon Falls, Ontario where Hastings was to spend many summers from about 1937 and where he was sometime counsellor and a director. (Correspondence from his vacation trips to Quebec in 1943 and 1946 is filed in Series 1). From 1953 and his visit to India, the chronological arrangement is divided in each year into the following categories: general, parents (later ‘mother’, India and (from 1955) Japan.

The volume of correspondence tails off in the mid-1970s; one file covers the years 1986-1997.

Professional Activities: University of Toronto

In the three years before Dr. Hastings was hired full-time at the University of Toronto in 1956, he combined a donship at South House, Burwash Hall, Victoria College with teaching courses in the Department of Public Health Administration, where he was employed as a fellow in medical care administration without salary (he did have two fellowships). He made enduring friendships from his stint as a don and the relative freedom he was given allowed him, as has been shown in the last series, to travel to India and Japan with the World University Service (further files on his travels with WUS are found in Series 5). In July of 1954 he embarked on a trip to western Canada to gain first-hand experience of the integration of medical care administration with the administration of a provincial health department. He worked in the Medical Services Division of the Department of Health in Saskatchewan until the end of August. Then, for three weeks, he was on the train, first to the West Coast, stopping en route to consult with medical officials in Alberta and British Columbia, and then returning to Toronto.

This first section of this series documents Dr. Hastings’ history of employment at the University, his activities in his early years, some of his teaching experience, and various ceremonial occasions. It begins with detailed files on Dr. Hastings’ two years (1953-1955) as a residence don, including correspondence, notes on residence discipline and items about student life generally. Next are the notebooks, diaries and letters documenting his trip across Canada. These are followed by a file [box 023, file 13] with correspondence and course material relating to his activities as a fellow in public health and preventive medicine and by files documenting the history of his employment at the University of Toronto. Next come the few files of lecture material (ca. 1953-1961, 1981-1982) in this accession, including documentation on a thesis supervised (1989-1991). This portion of the series concludes with files on ceremonies at the University and at York University between 1957 and 1965, including the installation of two chancellors and of Claude Bissell as president, and a file on the honorary doctorate bestowed on Hafldan Mahler in 1990.

The remainder of the files in this series is arranged from the broader University activities to the more specific; they document in detail Dr. Hastings’ role in planning and policy making. The first section contains files [box 025/(01)-(02)] on activities of the Governing Council relating to a sub-committee of its Planning and Resources Committee, of which Hastings was a member, and to the School of Hygiene. They are followed by presidential and presidential advisory committees and task forces on the future of the School of Hygiene (1972); gerontology, which Hastings chaired (1976-1977); the future of health care in Ontario (1991), and health services (1993); provostial reviews of the faculty of medicine (1986-1987 and 1992); and the Decanal Community Health Review task force (1987-1988). This section concludes with a study tour of Lithuanian health care facilities in 1995.

The second section, beginning with box 025, file 11, documents the activities of the Faculty of Medicine, primarily in its relationship to the School of Hygiene and community health programs at the University of Toronto. Included are such activities and events as the 60th anniversary of the School of Hygiene (1988); the Task Force on Professional Masters Programs in Community Health (1975-1977) and the Interfaculty Committee of Heath Science Deans on Outreach Project (1978-1979), both of which Hastings chaired; the Community Health Review and Planning Task Force (1978-1979); the faculty’s external review of the Division of Community Health (1978-1980) and its Decanal Community Health Review Task Force (1987-1988), of which Hastings was a member and which is thoroughly documented [see box 027].

The files relating to activities of the School of Hygiene from the 1950s to the 1970s [box 028], include its comparative study on the health care delivery systems in Sault Ste. Marie and St. Catharines; Dr. Hastings had a deep and long-term interest in the Sault project. Later Dr. Hastings was a member of the advisory committee on the history of the School of Hygiene, Within Reach of Everyone; there are files relating to the second volume. There are also files on the anniversary symposium of the School (1973) and undergraduate students’ reaction to the Hastings report of 1972 (see also Series 7).

Next are a few files documenting Dr. Hastings involvement with the Department of Health Administration, primarily between 1973 and 1981. The principal activity documented is the Canadian Health Administrator Study (1978-1981), for which Dr. Hastings was the principal investigator. Other files document the W. K. Kellogg Foundation grants, seminars and a name change in 2001 to the Department of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation.

The fifth section [box 029] begins with the formation of the Division of Community Health in the Faculty of Medicine in 1975, as the School of Hygiene was being dismantled, and the appointment of Dr. Hastings as associate dean. The principal subsequent activities documented here are the annual refresher course (1978), an advisory task force on the development of a professional master’s degree (1975-1978), a strategic plan for the Division (1990), and the 1992 divisional report. The files on the Graduate Department of Community Health [box 030] concentrate on program changes and reviews between 1979 and 1996 and on student research days (1990, 1997, 1998).

Issues relating to environmental health at the University of Toronto have traditionally been spread across several disciplines. The Faculty of Medicine’s Occupational and Environmental Health Unit was one such body in the early 1980s. In 1988 Dr. Hastings was appointed a member of a task force on environmental and human health, and throughout 1990 a work party on environmental and human health was the venue for discussions between the U of T and McMaster University over the creation of a joint Institute of Environment and Health which emerged during the following two years. Records here document the discussions and planning that took place and include the inaugural workshop in November 1991.

The next three boxes [031-033] contain records detailing the planning for and the first decade (1988-2001) of the Division of Community Health’s Centre for Health Promotion.
Included are initial proposals for the Centre, files on the interim management committee and the search first for an interim and then a permanent director, and meetings of the Centre’s advisory board. There are also files on workshops and seminars and a proposal on devolution submitted to the Premier’s Council on Health, Well-Being and Social Justice in 1993. These are followed by files on the Centre for International Health and the Department of Public Health Sciences, a 1997 merger of the departments of Behavioural Science and Preventive Medicine and Biostatistics. This section concludes with another task force (2002), on the future of the Centre for Health Promotion.

There then follows files documenting two City of Toronto projects from the end of the 1980s, the Board of Health’s Healthy Toronto 2000: a strategy for a healthier city and the city’s health care fund, both of which attracted considerable interest in the Faculty of Medicine, and files on Hastings’ participation in an advisory committee of the Wellesley Hospital relating to its urban community health project.

The series concludes with files on seven research proposals, of which five were rejected. The accepted projects were an annotated bibliography on the rationalization of child and material health services (1990) and of stakeholder perceptions of changes in the health care system (1991).

Other professional activities

Dr. Hastings’ professional activities are largely related to his interests in community medicine and often have close links to his work at the University of Toronto. The files are arranged alphabetically by the name of the organization or event with which they are most closely associated.

The series begins with a file on his participation in a round table discussion on “surveillance and the role of public health” for the Commission of Inquiry on the Blood System in Canada [Krever Commission] in 1995. This is followed by background material for and memoranda, statements and briefs, with which Dr. Hastings was involved, that were submitted to the Royal Commission on Health Services between 1961 and 1963, along with subsequent press coverage. He and Dr. William Mosley of the School of Hygiene submitted a massive report, “Organized community health services” in 1963, following a brief, drafts of which are preserved here, presented by the School’s director, Dr. Andrew Rhodes, the previous year.

Hastings was also a member of committees of the Canadian Public Health Association and the United Church of Canada that submitted briefs in 1962.

Other files document Dr. Hastings’ activities with Canadian College of Health Service Executives, for which he chaired the Extendicare Award Selection Committee for 1984-1986; in the mid-1980s, the Canadian Council on Social Development, for which he helped develop strategies for community health services, and the Canadian Hospital Association, for which he participated in a study on the future of hospitals in Canada.

Dr. Hastings was made an honorary life member of the Canadian Public Health Association for his many contributions. The files (boxes 036-038) document his activities as a president (1996-1997), as a member of its board of directors and several committees, including public health practices, archives, higher education and, especially, international health secretariat and review (1988-1992) and a planning committee for a national workshop on public health education (1991). There is a substantial file on the drafting of a national health plan for the Palestinian people (1993). Other files include the restructuring of Ontario health services (1997), the Canadian Institutes for Health Research, and the Association’s annual conferences for 1980 and from 1991 to 2000. There are also a number of briefs and reports.

The files on the Canadian Welfare Council document the activities of its special committee on health services’ submissions to the Royal Commission on Health Services. These are followed by files on health issues faced by the City of Toronto in 1992 and 2002; Dr. Hastings had been a member of the liaison committees of the University of Toronto with the teaching health units for East York, North York and the City of Toronto.

In 1971 Dr. Hastings went on full-time leave for a year from the University of Toronto to direct a major study of a community health centre project for the Conference of Health Ministers of Canada. His files (boxes 039-041) include correspondence, memoranda, notes, budgets, position papers, minutes of meetings, interim and progress reports, and working seminars, along with drafts of the final report and reactions to it. The report, instantly dubbed “The Hastings Report”, was widely praised and cemented Dr. Hastings’ reputation as a leading authority in his field.

Other activities documented in this series include two conferences on epidemiology, one in Cali, Columbia during his tour of public health services in South America in 1959 and the other a joint National Cancer Institute of Canada/U of T meeting in 1988. There are files for conferences on comparative health services at Ditchley, England (1972) and Dublin (1980), and for consulting on health administration for the Informatie en Communicatie Unie in the Netherlands (1981) and the Oakville-Trafalgar Memorial Hospital (1992). There is also a copy of an undated (ca. 1976) and unpublished report on an overview of the Canadian health system.

Dr. Hastings’ association with the Pan American Health Organization dates from the 1960s. Late in 1964 he was a participant in a special program on health planning sponsored by the World Health Organization, the PAHO and the United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America, for which he visited Chile, Uruguay and Argentina, already referred to in Series 3. The files here date largely from 1974, when he critiqued a long-term planning report for the WHO, and his consultancy two years later for that organization on health services in Brazil and Chile. This and other work lead to him receiving the PAHO Administration Award for 1987. The majority of the PAHO files relate to the Canadian-Caribbean Health Initiative (boxes 042-044), a joint PAHO/University of Toronto/CPHA project for which, from its inception in 1988, Dr. Hastings served as chair of the steering committee. There are also files relating to the Caribbean Public Health Association and the Caribbean Regional Epidemiology Centre.

Dr. Hastings acted as a consultant and expert on many issues relating to community health, including two in Quebec -- programs in community health (1980) and the Quebec Commission de l’Enquéte sur les Services Santé (1987), and pediatric issues for the Thames Valley District Health Council (1988). One of his early research projects (1966-1970) was a joint Canada-WHO study of the delivery of health services in Sault Ste. Marie, due to the then unique program in Canada of Algoma Steel Corporation offering its employees a choice of health benefits through the local district health association or a private carrier. The findings were published in 1973, a follow-up study was carried out by the Ontario Ministry of Health in 1975, and a history of the Sault Ste. Marie and District Group Health Association followed in 1981.

In 1992 Dr. Hastings was invited to address a seminar on heath care systems organized by the Mexican Foundation for Health and the National Academy of Medicine, to be held the
following March in Mexico City. He kept extensive files on the proceedings. In 1994 he was invited to be a consultant to the World Bank’s health project for the newly independent republic of Georgia. He visited the country on three occasions over the next two years and kept detailed files on his activities, including correspondence, notes, reports, and photographs.

The series ends with several activities related to Dr. Hastings’ travels in the 1950s and the early 1960s to Asia, and to his involvement with the World Health Organization both at the beginning and the end of his career. In 1953, on the way back to Canada from the his World University Service trip to India (see Series 3 and below), he stopped off in Britain to attend the first World Conference on Medical Education in London, to take in the Queen’s coronation, and to visit Scotland, especially Edinburgh and Iona. He kept a file on this conference and on the third world conference in New Delhi in 1966, after which he toured northern India, making a side trip to Madras and Ludhiana, and then going on to Hong Kong and Japan.

In 1960 a World Health Organization travel fellowship enabled Dr. Hastings to study medical care, public health and the teaching of social medicine in the United Kingdom, Scandinavia, the USSR, India, Ceylon, Singapore, and Japan. Again, he kept detailed records of his travels, including notes and accounts of his impressions, especially on the Soviet Union. Afterwards, he wrote a detailed report on what he saw. Later WHO –related activities include an employment offer as chief of WHO’s Organization of Medical Care Unit in Geneva (1969), which Dr. Hastings reluctantly turned down; and his work as member of WHO’s Expert Advisory Panel on Public Health Administration between 1974 and 1990.

In the summer of 1953, as the University of Toronto’s representative at the World University Service International Mysore Seminar, Dr. Hastings had an opportunity to gain first hand insights into and an understanding of the many problems facing developing countries. He visited India, Ceylon and Pakistan, and carefully preserved his correspondence, notes, reports and photographs. Two years later, he was the University’s faculty member on the WUS International Japan Seminar, and spent a further month studying medical education and medical care in Japan through an arrangement with the World Health Organization. His correspondence, diaries, minutes of meetings, and notes served him well; he was much in demand on the lecture circuit afterwards, especially after his report on medical education in Japan and other articles reflecting on his experiences appeared in 1956 and 1957. The series ends with a 1962 report on the WUS student tuberculosis sanatorium in Japan and a file on the WUS Chile Seminar in 1964.

Other activities

The records in this series underscore the impact of an upbringing where the tenets of Christianity, public service, and duty were emphasized. They begin with thirty years (1937-1969) of files on Camp Kagawong, a privately owned boy’s camp on Balsam Lake, where Dr. Hastings spent his summers as a young boy enjoying the outdoors. The leadership qualities he displayed led to his becoming a camp counsellor (1944-1945) and, from 1946-1950, director of the Bantam Section and instructor in nature, first aid, swimming and games. During those years he dramatized three folk tales for presentation. At the weekly chapel services, he often delivered homilies or ‘sermonettes’, a practice he continued throughout his association with the camp that closed in 1975. Dr. Hastings’ activities at Camp Kagawong are well documented through notes, certificates, correspondence (much of which is in Series 3) scripts for theatrical presentations, chapel service programs and sermonettes, and some of the annual camp catalogues, photographs and artifacts. The arrangement of the files is largely chronological.

The material on Camp Kagawong is followed by files on Canadian Council of Churches and its Vellore/Ludhiana Committee, of which Dr. Hastings was a member from 1962-1975 and to which he was an advisor from 1975 to 1981. These are followed by files on the Christian Medical College in Vellore, India, including extensive ones documenting the work of the international review team that visited Vellore in 1979 and produced a report on its findings in 1980.

Next are files on the coronation of Queen Elizabeth in 1953; the Developing Countries Farm Radio Network, of which Dr. Hastings was a member of the board; Emmanuel College, where he was a University representative on its council and a member of its curriculum committee; the King’s College Fund which in 1985 organized a Canadian study tour of health services in Britain; and on Pickering College in Newmarket, Ontario. A member of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada, Dr. Hastings was active in its youth clubs in the 1940s. He attended the 1948 convention at which George Drew was selected leader and took part in the federal election the following year.

Dr. Hastings’ place of worship for many years was St. Andrew’s United Church at 117 Bloor Street East in Toronto. He played a very active role in its affairs, serving on its board, many of its committees, was a member of its Men’s Club and, on occasion, delivered the sermon of the week. The files cover the years from 1952 to 1973, when St. Andrew’s and the Yonge Street United Church amalgamated and include correspondence, notices of services, minutes of meetings, reports, and drafts of three sermons.

This series ends with a number of files on Dr. Hastings’ involvement in several activities of the United Church of Canada, centring around his being a member of its task force on health services (1985-1987) and its Division of Mission in Canada’s health task group (1991-1994). Included are correspondence, minutes, memoranda, notes, drafts of reports, and a video, “Taking the pulse of Canadian health care” that grew out of the work of the health task group.

Employment

The records in this series document Professor Helleiner's employment at Yale University and the University of Toronto. Most of the material for the former relates to his being seconded to the Nigerian Institute of Social and Economic Research (NISER) at the University of Ibadan in 1962-1963.

The files for the University of Toronto document his employment record generally, his leave as director of the Economic Research Bureau, University College, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, (September, 1966 to June, 1968), his sabbatical leave at the Institute of Development Studies at the University of Sussex, and his committee work in the Department of Political Economy (from 1981, Economics). There are also files on planning projects and on the Centre for International Studies and other international programs. There is extensive correspondence with his undergraduate, graduate, and post-graduate students and students from other universities and countries, much of it contained in the individual files on graduate students that he supervised or on whose thesis committee he sat, as an internal or an external examiner. These files contain correspondence, progress and research reports, thesis committee reports, and references. The arrangement is alphabetical by name of student.

Visits and interviews

Ms. Heaton followed up the questionnaire with visits and interviews to selected medical libraries in Canada and the United States. This series consists of correspondence and notes concerning these interviews. Also included are 28 photographs of libraries visited.

Correspondence

Prof. Heichelheim maintained a regular correspondence with friends, family and colleagues both in Canada and around the world up to the year of his death. His brother’s name was Arthur Heichelheim and he lived in London England. This series dominates this fonds and includes correspondence with classical scholars at Cambridge and Oxford and at the University of Giessen (Prof. Heichelheim’s former employer), as well as at the University of Toronto. Such scholars include many of his co-authors such as E.N. Adler, Prof. F. L. Griffith, J. G. Tait, T. Frank, H. Michel, Prof. Elemer Balogh and Prof. Cedric Yeo. Correspondence is in English or German, depending on the nationality of the correspondent.

During World War II he continued to maintain ongoing correspondence with his brother and other family members, along with other scholars left in Europe and frequently describe living conditions, lost friends, the death camps and establishment of a Jewish state in Palestine. Correspondence with family and friends is often in German.

Manuscripts: book reviews and articles

This series contains drafts of some of Heichelheim’s manuscripts for published and unpublished articles and books reviews. Among these works is a series of files of manuscripts and correspondence relating to articles submitted to the Oxford Classical Dictionary on Celtic gods, ancient economic history etc. 1938-1939.

Coins

Prof. Heichelheim also became well known as a numismatist. After leaving Germany in 1933, he worked for the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge cataloguing the General and Leake coin collections and preparing a series of catalogues for publication over the next two decades (ca 1937-1950). This series contains drafts of these catalogues (Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum IV (Parts 1-5), photographs of the coins reproduced in the catalogues, correspondence, notes, as well as a report on the Department of Coins and Medals at the Fitzwilliam Museum (ca 1942). There are also two files on the Giessen coin collection and two files which may contain drafts of articles (in German).

Photograph

This series consists of one item, a portrait of Harold Innis, Helleiner's colleague in the Department of Political Economy at the University of Toronto. The portrait was taken by the Toronto photographers Ashley & Crippeu.

Professional Correspondence

This series contains records from three accessions: B1994-0002, B2009-0021, and B2015-0007. The bulk of the files are from accession B1994-0002, and consists of general incoming and out-going correspondence mainly of a professional nature. It is arranged in two parts. The first part consists of files created by Helen Hogg containing correspondence and other accompanying material with individuals, institutions, clubs and associations regarding research, special projects, events, visits, excursions, travel, donations, lectures, awards and publications. For access, these have been arranged alphabetically by file title. Some of the more notable correspondence are with colleagues such as Amelia Whelau (University of Western Ontario), Steven Van Agt (Germany), Martha Liller (Harvard Observatory), Bart J. Bok (Harvard and Australia), Chu Yu-Hua (China), and there is also extensive correspondence with Harlow Shapley, director of the Harvard College Observatory and mentor to Prof. Hogg.

The second part of this series consists of miscellaneous correspondence arranged by decade. Far from being extraneous pieces, this correspondence is quite extensive and reveals much about her professional activities and on-going research. These files contain the largest volume of correspondence documenting both her and Frank Hogg's early career in the 1930s and 1940s. These files were created from loose correspondence within the records or from files, which were clearly miscellaneous.

Researchers should note that while this series does not represent the whole of the Hogg correspondence (much of which is specific to each series), it is a good representation of the scope of her interests and activities. Some of the correspondence relates directly to records in other series and researchers should bear this in mind when investigating a particular topic.

Personal Correspondence

This series contains extensive correspondence from family and friends documenting Dr. Hogg's personal relationships throughout her lifetime. The bulk of it is incoming correspondence, which has been filed by year to impose some order. Filed at the beginning are some files created by Dr. Hogg which also include outgoing correspondence. This is usually filed by correspondent chronologically.

Of significance are the courtship letters between Helen and Frank in the late 1920s, as well as her letters home to her family in Dunstable from the Dominion Observatory in Victoria B.C. and later from the David Dunlap Observatory in Toronto. These letters not only lend insight into their personal lives during these early years but detail, as well the progress of their astronomical work and the general activities at each observatory. They would be useful to anyone researching early astronomy in Canada.

Researchers should note that most of this correspondence was found loose and that attempts to sort it and identify it as personal have been made. However, some of the correspondence may relate directly to professional activities and will inevitably discuss professional as well as personal matters.

Education

This series encompasses Dr. Hogg's postsecondary education including her undergraduate schooling at Mount Holyoke College culminating in her earning an A.B. (Magna Cum Laude) in 1926, her graduation from Radcliffe College with an A.M. in 1928 and a Ph.D. in 1931. The series is comprised mainly of course outlines, course and laboratory notes, term papers, examinations, miscellaneous school-related assignments as well as Mount Holyoke and Radcliffe memorabilia. It includes a copy of Dr. Hogg's Ph.D. thesis as well as a critique of it by Harlow Shapley. Some examples of elementary and secondary school notebooks and exercises are also present.

Files B2015-0007/004 (11) & (12) consists of honorary degrees from the University of Toronto (1977), Mount Holyoke College, University of Waterloo, McMaster University, and Saint Mary’s University.

Memorabilia

Includes invitations, certificates, guest books, Helen Hogg's Baby Book, and scrapbooks. Also includes diplomas, awards and honorary degrees.

Graphic Records

Includes slides and photoprints documenting both Dr. Hogg's personal and professional life including family gatherings and events, trips, astronomical conferences, ceremonies, visits to various observatories. Also included are images she collected regarding the history of Astronomy as well as publicity shots of her taken for various publications.

Photoprints from B1996-0020 document the meeting of the International Astronomical Union Held in the Soviet Union [Russia], 1958. Helen Hogg, as well as other Canadian astronomers including A. Batten and S. van de Bergh, were present and can be seen in these shots.

Professional Associations

Records in this series document Dr. Hogg's involvement in numerous associations relating to the study of astronomy. The series, comprised mainly of correspondence, memoranda, reports, membership lists, newsletters, agenda and committee minutes, documents the various positions of authority she held in the leading national and international astronomical and scientific organizations. They cover a twenty-five year span including:

Program Director for Astronomy, United States National Science Foundation (1955-1956); president of the International Astronomical Union Subcommission on Variable Stars in Star Clusters (1955-1961); president of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada (1957-1959); first woman president of the Physical Sciences section, Royal Society of Canada (1960-1961); president of the Royal Canadian Institute (1964); Councillor of the American Astronomical Society (1965-1968); first president of the Canadian Astronomical Society (1971-1972); honorary president of the Toronto Centre, Royal Astronomical Society of Canada (1972-1977) and honorary president of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada (1977-1981).

The series also serves to document the wider activities of these organizations in addition to simply shedding light on the activities of Dr. Hogg alone. Notably, council and committee minutes strongly document the workings of the Toronto Centre of the R.A.S.C. between 1961-1986, the R.S.C. between 1955-1985 and the R.C.I. from 1954-1968. The activities of the IAU are also well represented. In particular, a series of reports and memoranda between 1952-1981 highlight the workings of Commission 27 on Variable Stars. Related records outlining the activities of these professional organizations can also be found in the General Professional Correspondence Series (Series I).

Arrangement is alphabetical by association, which include:

  • American Astronomical Society (AAS)
  • American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO)
  • Canadian Astronomical Society (CAS)
  • International Astronomical Union (IAU)
  • National Research Council (NRC)
  • National Science Foundation (NSF)
  • Royal Astronomical Society of Canada (RASC)
  • Royal Canadian Institute (RCI)
  • Royal Society of Canada (RSC)

Articles, Manuscripts, Addresses

This is an extensive series, which documents Dr. Hogg's publishing activities. Since many of her published articles were addresses delivered at symposiums or reports made to professional committees, addresses and talks have also been included in this series. The files, usually titled by the name of the article, book or publisher contain not only manuscripts and drafts but related correspondence, notes, memos and outlines.

The arrangement of this series is as follows, starting from general articles to the specific endeavour

  • Bibliographies and lists of publications
  • General articles, addresses, contributions to encyclopedias
  • Obituaries
  • Academic Papers on Star Clusters
  • Bibliography and Catalogue of Star Clusters
  • Contributions to "Out of Old Books"
  • "The Stars Belong to Everyone"
  • Toronto Star Column
  • Miscellaneous Writings
  • Reprints

Records in this series document both Dr. Hogg's stature as an authority on variable stars and star clusters as well as her role as a teacher of popular astronomy. Draft articles and related notes and correspondence on numerous scientific papers as well as files documenting her contribution to encyclopedias and handbooks reflect both of these roles.

Notably, her work on various editions of "A Catalogue of Variable Stars in Globular Clusters" (1st ed. 1939, 2nd ed. 1955, 3rd. ed. 1973 and 4th incomplete), as well as her time spent on "A Bibliography of Individual Globular Clusters" (1947, 1st supplement 1963) is extensively documented through drafts, research data, original manuscripts. These records relate specifically to the card index found in Series IV, Star Cluster Files and Index Cards.

Star Cluster Files and Index Cards

The Star Cluster files, assembled over her 40 years as an astronomer, represent the core of Dr. Hogg's research in a field for which she is an authority and from which many of her published articles were derived. The files are variously comprised of raw data, calculations, correspondence, draft and published articles relating to specific globular clusters. Prints from photographic plates also accompany some files . Most files are titled according to the New General Catalogue number, e.g. NGC 6626, of the star cluster and are arranged numerically following Dr. Hogg's own filing system.

A set of ten boxes of bibliographic index cards accompanies the Star Cluster Files. Cards in boxes seem to relate to specific subjects ie. external galaxies, variables in clusters, interstellar absorption. Boxes /044 - /048 are arranged more or less chronologically by the date of the bibliographic references. All were used for various editions of "A Catalogue of Variable Stars in Globular Clusters". Box B1994-0002/048 appears to relate specifically to references used in "A of Bibliography of Individual Globular Clusters" and its supplement. Index cards in box B1994-0002/049 do not appear to be bibliographic references but rather relate information on specific star clusters and are arranged by NGC number.

Photographs have been left in their original files because of their immediate association with the research materials. It was feared that removal of these photos from individual files would obscure the meaning of both the research in the file and the photographs themselves.

Personal

Contains personal correspondence mainly documenting Hollander’s achievements including many congratulatory notes from colleagues regarding awards or the publication of his major works.

Correspondence and related documents also document his appointment as University Professor and the campaign beginning in 1991 to procure for him a Nobel Prize in Economics. Also documented are his appointments through the University ranks, his salary, and the awarding of grants to support his research including activity reports and grant applications.

This series also contains records collected by Hollander over his academic and professional career, and includes various graduate school lecture notes, school transcripts, honorary degrees, and a heavily annotated copy of David Ricardo’s book Principles of Political Economy which he kept separate from other professional and academic papers.

Filed at the beginning of each accession is his most updated C.V. at the time the records were acquired (see B1998-0027/001(1) and B2012-0018/001(1)). There is also a portrait of Hollander, to be found in B1998-0027/001P.

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