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Lectures

Series consists of lectures, 1854–1887, predominantly concerning religion, but including philosophy, metaphysics and ethics.

The three boxes of lectures range in date from 1854 to 1887. Most are contained in notebooks, and they tend to be in the form of brief notes and questions rather than fully realized drafts. Usually the academic lectures are constructed around the texts which have been chosen for a particular course. Also included in this series are several lectures of a more popular or informal nature which were designed to appeal to student audiences or to the general public. Following the lectures are those notebooks which contain some combination of record types such as essays, sermons, addresses, and lectures.

Correspondence

Series consists of predominantly incoming but including outgoing correspondence, 1915-1923, relating to teaching/finances/administration at Victoria University, church and educational matters, personal affairs, family (includes posthumous letters), and social issues.

Writing

Series consists of manuscripts - some in notebooks - of sermons, addresses, lectures, essays, articles, reviews and reports, 1860-1917, on various subjects, including education, religion, social issues, mission work, university federation, the founding of the University of Toronto, and ethics. Also included are addresses/lectures to Victoria College students, various graduating classes, academic conferences and religious institutions, as well as Victoria College reports.

Papers of Father John O'Connor

Series consists of a collection of hand-written and typed manuscripts, poems, translations and radio transcripts created and accumulated by Monsignor John O'Connor, as well as his correspondence, collected ephemera (including news clippings, Christmas cards, posters, pamphlets, and small press publications) and research notes. The majority of the material relates to O'Connor's friendship with the author G.K. Chesterton, although O'Connor also translated Latin religious poetry and composed his own verse and wrote prose pieces on literature, Church history, morality, religion and philosophy.

Records of Edward Wilson Wallace, Jr.

Series consists of an account of a bicycle tour of England, Scotland and Ireland and reminiscences of his father, Edward Wilson Wallace entitled "Round the World with Edward" in regards to a trip from China with Edward Jr.

Wallace, Edward Wilson, Jr.

Media productions

Dr. Morton early realized the potential of using the visual and sound media as a method of documenting historically significant events in Canadian history, which could then be used as teaching aids in the classroom, with possible distribution to a wider audience. The principal resource for these projects was a rapidly expanding collection of photographs and slides that he had been amassing for some years. Beginning in 1970, he began to meld the old technology of slide lectures, which had been in use at the University of Toronto since before the turn of the century, with the newer medium of television and the emerging one of video. The potential excited one film maker who wrote, “I think an excellent programme could be produced from your slide collection on the Northwest Rebellion…By throwing the slides up on a screen we would then be able to get slide animation, by using the television camera to pan from one part of the scene to another and zoom in on some detail, or incident.”

The old and the new technologies were used in tandem, as the video production, though relatively inexpensive to produce, cost much more than slides and took time to realize. For general classroom use, Dr. Morton created a series of slide programmes, accompanied by notes and, occasionally, scripts, on various aspects of Canadian history. The topics ranged from Canadian nationalism and imperialism, to the North-West Campaign of 1885, the Manitoba School Question, immigration during the two decades before World War I, and to working women in the post-Confederation era. Some of these themes were developed more fully in his moving image productions that also took shape during the decade.

Dr. Morton sought support and funds for his video projects primarily through officials at the University of Toronto, the principal division being the Instructional Media Centre, but also through educational and broadcasting channels outside the University. Officials early recognized the necessity of creating a product with an appeal beyond the confines of the University – the videos would fill an educational niche as “a medium for a kind of scholarly publication cum library or similar resource”. They were modestly successful in achieving that goal.

Dr. Morton’s first foray into the realm of video production was the 16-minute production on the ‘Winnipeg General Strike’ that appeared in 1973. Other productions followed in rapid succession over the next six years – (‘Canada's First War: The 1885 Rebellion’ (1974), ‘The Fourth Wave: Newcomers to Canada, 1896-1914’ (1974), ‘The Canadian General: Sir William Otter (1975), ‘The Splendid Dream: Canadian Labour and the Left’ (for Ontario Educational Communications Authority, 1975-6), ‘The Conscription Crisis, 1917’ (1977), ‘Bread and Roses: The Struggle of Canadian Working Women’ (1978), and, in 1979, four titles, two of which revisited old themes: ‘The Great Canadian Temperance Crusade’, ‘The Winnipeg General Strike, 1919’, ‘Saskatchewan, 1885’ , and ‘Struggle for Identity’. For ‘The Splendid Dream’, financial support was sought from the United Steelworkers of America and interviews were conducted with, amongst others, Tommy Douglas and David Lewis. Most of these videos are present in this series.

Dr. Morton’s involvement in moving image productions has continued since this auspicious beginning. In May of 1980, TV Ontario launched Canadians in Conflict, a six-part series “on major traumas in our history”. It was conceived by Dr. Morton who was also its on-air narrator. It incorporated several of his video productions, beginning with ‘Bread and Roses’ and ending with ‘Struggle for Identity’. In 1980 and 1981 he compiled tape-film strips for NC Multimedia on ‘Canada in the First World War’ and ‘Canada in the Twenties’. In 1983, he worked with an independent company on a filmstrip production entitled ‘The Canadian Constitution’, and on ‘Canada and World War I’, for which he was an advisor. In 1985 he revisited the North-West Rebellion for the third time in a production for the National Museum of Civilization that was, in 1993, converted to a new format, CD-ROM. In 1989, as a member of the advisory board of TV Ontario, he produced ‘Lift, right and centre: Party politics in Canada’. He also conducted a number of interviews for the program ‘TVO at 25’.

This series begins with a correspondence file on Dr. Morton’s sound and moving image productions generally, followed by files on specific productions, some of which are accompanied by videos. The correspondence files and videos are arranged by project date. These files are followed by others documenting Dr. Morton slide programmes, with accompanying notes and occasional scripts, for formal lectures at Erindale College and for public addresses outside the university. The textual records conclude with a file on a CBC radio interview. Accompanying these records are a number of audiotapes that Dr. Morton collected or recorded with an eye to future research use. These include a CBC production, ‘Project ’66: The frail revolutionary, J. S. Woodsworth’, and an interview he recorded with Tommy Douglas and his wife in 1984.

Diaries and journals

Series consists of diaries and journals, 1859-1914 containing entries regarding ethical and religious thoughts, personal finances, travel, and daily activities.

Notes and manuscripts

Series consists of notes and manuscripts, including notes for "Inductive Theology", manuscripts for "Annual of Christian Theology" and research material and drafts for Burwash's autobiography and biography, and the history of Victoria College, published 1927.

Records

Series consists of pamphlets, programmes, invitations and other printed material, notes and notebooks, lectures, resolutions, sermons, Victoria College minutes, examinations and other records, memoranda, annotated family bible, and financial records, 1845-1927.

Records related in finance and investments

Series consists of records related to the University's finances and investments. Included are account books and ledgers, financial journals, financial daybooks, cash books, subscription books for fund raising, and other financial record books. Also includes some miscellaneous financial records as well as those related to the Pension Plan, annual financial statements and reports, procedure manuals, and budgets as well as financial oversight of student organizations.
Also consists of correspondence, minutes and articles relating to social responsibility in investments for the United Church of Canada and affiliated or related institutions, as well as policies and guidelines for investments and endowment spending.

Records related to events

Series consists of correspondence, programs, guest lists and other records relating to special events, predominantly installations, 1931–1981. Series also consists of addresses, statistics and other records relating to a one-day open conference entitled “Give Us This Day,” 1981.

Records relating to archives

Series consists of correspondence, reports, draft agreements, discussion papers relating to the location of the Archives; budget and staffing proposals, and records relating to construction, maintenance and renovations, 1953-1986; and correspondence, reports, financial records, minutes, notes, statistics and other records relating to the termination of the United Church archives from the University, 2004-2009

Records of the Women’s Student Union Advisory Committee / Wymilwood Committee

Series consists of the minutes of the Women's Student Union Advisory Committee and minutes of the Wymilwood Committee. Also includes reports of the Head of the Union, the Union's financial records, lists of members, and ephemera from the opening of Wymilwood.

Women’s Student Union Advisory Committee

John Craig Davidson

Consists of the incoming, personal correspondence written to John Craig Davidson, who went by his middle name, Craig. The majority of the letters are from Helen Hudson, his fiancee at the time, who was working as a nurse. Also includes lecture notes regarding the military from 1939 and a blank 1941 Athletic Club dance program with attached pencil.

Davidson, John Craig

General correspondence

Series consists of general correspondence in the following subseries:
Nathanael Burwash, 1907-1912
Richard P. Bowles, 1913-1930
Edward Wilson Wallace, 1930-1940
Walter T. Brown, 1941-1948
Walter T. Brown and Harold Bennett, 19491950
A.B.B. Moore, 1956-1963
A.B.B. Moore, John E. Hodgetts, Goldwin S. French, and Eva Kushner, 1963-1991
Eva Kushner and Roseann Runte, 1987-1999
Roseann Runte, 1999-2001
Paul Gooch, 2001-2009

Records relating to functions

Series consists of correspondence, minutes, citations, addresses and other records, 1913-2010, relating to functions and events such as public lectures including the Davey Lectures and Ide Lectures, convocations and honorary degree ceremonies, centenary celebrations, honorary dinners, openings, events held at the Bader Theatre, and installations of Principals, Presidents and Chancellors.

Records relating to students

Series consists of correspondence, minutes, reports and other records, 1915-2007, relating to individual students, including disciplinary issues and to student government organizations, including the Emmanuel College Student Society, Victoria College Union and the Victoria University Students' Administrative Council (VUSAC).

Other professional activities

Dr. Hastings’ professional activities are largely related to his interests in community medicine and often have close links to his work at the University of Toronto. The files are arranged alphabetically by the name of the organization or event with which they are most closely associated.

The series begins with a file on his participation in a round table discussion on “surveillance and the role of public health” for the Commission of Inquiry on the Blood System in Canada [Krever Commission] in 1995. This is followed by background material for and memoranda, statements and briefs, with which Dr. Hastings was involved, that were submitted to the Royal Commission on Health Services between 1961 and 1963, along with subsequent press coverage. He and Dr. William Mosley of the School of Hygiene submitted a massive report, “Organized community health services” in 1963, following a brief, drafts of which are preserved here, presented by the School’s director, Dr. Andrew Rhodes, the previous year.

Hastings was also a member of committees of the Canadian Public Health Association and the United Church of Canada that submitted briefs in 1962.

Other files document Dr. Hastings’ activities with Canadian College of Health Service Executives, for which he chaired the Extendicare Award Selection Committee for 1984-1986; in the mid-1980s, the Canadian Council on Social Development, for which he helped develop strategies for community health services, and the Canadian Hospital Association, for which he participated in a study on the future of hospitals in Canada.

Dr. Hastings was made an honorary life member of the Canadian Public Health Association for his many contributions. The files (boxes 036-038) document his activities as a president (1996-1997), as a member of its board of directors and several committees, including public health practices, archives, higher education and, especially, international health secretariat and review (1988-1992) and a planning committee for a national workshop on public health education (1991). There is a substantial file on the drafting of a national health plan for the Palestinian people (1993). Other files include the restructuring of Ontario health services (1997), the Canadian Institutes for Health Research, and the Association’s annual conferences for 1980 and from 1991 to 2000. There are also a number of briefs and reports.

The files on the Canadian Welfare Council document the activities of its special committee on health services’ submissions to the Royal Commission on Health Services. These are followed by files on health issues faced by the City of Toronto in 1992 and 2002; Dr. Hastings had been a member of the liaison committees of the University of Toronto with the teaching health units for East York, North York and the City of Toronto.

In 1971 Dr. Hastings went on full-time leave for a year from the University of Toronto to direct a major study of a community health centre project for the Conference of Health Ministers of Canada. His files (boxes 039-041) include correspondence, memoranda, notes, budgets, position papers, minutes of meetings, interim and progress reports, and working seminars, along with drafts of the final report and reactions to it. The report, instantly dubbed “The Hastings Report”, was widely praised and cemented Dr. Hastings’ reputation as a leading authority in his field.

Other activities documented in this series include two conferences on epidemiology, one in Cali, Columbia during his tour of public health services in South America in 1959 and the other a joint National Cancer Institute of Canada/U of T meeting in 1988. There are files for conferences on comparative health services at Ditchley, England (1972) and Dublin (1980), and for consulting on health administration for the Informatie en Communicatie Unie in the Netherlands (1981) and the Oakville-Trafalgar Memorial Hospital (1992). There is also a copy of an undated (ca. 1976) and unpublished report on an overview of the Canadian health system.

Dr. Hastings’ association with the Pan American Health Organization dates from the 1960s. Late in 1964 he was a participant in a special program on health planning sponsored by the World Health Organization, the PAHO and the United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America, for which he visited Chile, Uruguay and Argentina, already referred to in Series 3. The files here date largely from 1974, when he critiqued a long-term planning report for the WHO, and his consultancy two years later for that organization on health services in Brazil and Chile. This and other work lead to him receiving the PAHO Administration Award for 1987. The majority of the PAHO files relate to the Canadian-Caribbean Health Initiative (boxes 042-044), a joint PAHO/University of Toronto/CPHA project for which, from its inception in 1988, Dr. Hastings served as chair of the steering committee. There are also files relating to the Caribbean Public Health Association and the Caribbean Regional Epidemiology Centre.

Dr. Hastings acted as a consultant and expert on many issues relating to community health, including two in Quebec -- programs in community health (1980) and the Quebec Commission de l’Enquéte sur les Services Santé (1987), and pediatric issues for the Thames Valley District Health Council (1988). One of his early research projects (1966-1970) was a joint Canada-WHO study of the delivery of health services in Sault Ste. Marie, due to the then unique program in Canada of Algoma Steel Corporation offering its employees a choice of health benefits through the local district health association or a private carrier. The findings were published in 1973, a follow-up study was carried out by the Ontario Ministry of Health in 1975, and a history of the Sault Ste. Marie and District Group Health Association followed in 1981.

In 1992 Dr. Hastings was invited to address a seminar on heath care systems organized by the Mexican Foundation for Health and the National Academy of Medicine, to be held the
following March in Mexico City. He kept extensive files on the proceedings. In 1994 he was invited to be a consultant to the World Bank’s health project for the newly independent republic of Georgia. He visited the country on three occasions over the next two years and kept detailed files on his activities, including correspondence, notes, reports, and photographs.

The series ends with several activities related to Dr. Hastings’ travels in the 1950s and the early 1960s to Asia, and to his involvement with the World Health Organization both at the beginning and the end of his career. In 1953, on the way back to Canada from the his World University Service trip to India (see Series 3 and below), he stopped off in Britain to attend the first World Conference on Medical Education in London, to take in the Queen’s coronation, and to visit Scotland, especially Edinburgh and Iona. He kept a file on this conference and on the third world conference in New Delhi in 1966, after which he toured northern India, making a side trip to Madras and Ludhiana, and then going on to Hong Kong and Japan.

In 1960 a World Health Organization travel fellowship enabled Dr. Hastings to study medical care, public health and the teaching of social medicine in the United Kingdom, Scandinavia, the USSR, India, Ceylon, Singapore, and Japan. Again, he kept detailed records of his travels, including notes and accounts of his impressions, especially on the Soviet Union. Afterwards, he wrote a detailed report on what he saw. Later WHO –related activities include an employment offer as chief of WHO’s Organization of Medical Care Unit in Geneva (1969), which Dr. Hastings reluctantly turned down; and his work as member of WHO’s Expert Advisory Panel on Public Health Administration between 1974 and 1990.

In the summer of 1953, as the University of Toronto’s representative at the World University Service International Mysore Seminar, Dr. Hastings had an opportunity to gain first hand insights into and an understanding of the many problems facing developing countries. He visited India, Ceylon and Pakistan, and carefully preserved his correspondence, notes, reports and photographs. Two years later, he was the University’s faculty member on the WUS International Japan Seminar, and spent a further month studying medical education and medical care in Japan through an arrangement with the World Health Organization. His correspondence, diaries, minutes of meetings, and notes served him well; he was much in demand on the lecture circuit afterwards, especially after his report on medical education in Japan and other articles reflecting on his experiences appeared in 1956 and 1957. The series ends with a 1962 report on the WUS student tuberculosis sanatorium in Japan and a file on the WUS Chile Seminar in 1964.

Diaries

Series consists of Adena Black's diaries from 1913-1918, from the time of her marriage to Davidson Black through the First World War.

Film

This series consists of five films made by Dr. Black. Four are home movies documenting his children, Davy and Nevitt; one is of the Summer Palace and Elliott Smith in Peking in 1930.

Publications and addresses

This series documents only one of Davidson Black’s publications, but more of his addresses, in particular some he delivered in 1925 before his discovery of Peking Man, and the Croonian Lecture in December 1932 that cemented the acceptance of his research.

Employment

Except for photographs, this series contains little documentation on Davidson Black’s employment before 1917 when he enlisted with the Canadian Army Medical Corps and went overseas. The bulk of this series relates to his work in China at the Peking Union Medical College, his anthropological research including his discovery of "Peking man", and his travels within China and to Mongolia, India, Siam, and elsewhere.

The files contain correspondence, photographs, addresses, and publications (including some drafts), and memorabilia. Most of the photographs were taken by Dr. Black himself, though some were taken by Adena and others (especially presentation copies) by friends and colleagues. Dr. Black carefully annotated many of the photos he took, often in considerable detail even to the time of day and the shutter speed used. Included are a few glass-plate negatives and about 50 lantern slides. The negatives are usually dated and were kept except if they were in good condition. On his travels, Dr. Black collected autographed photographs of many of the scientists and academics he met; these are included in this series.

Education

This series contains certificates and diplomas, correspondence, course and lab notes, term papers and memorabilia documenting aspects of Davidson Black’s education, running from the Wellesley School through Harbord Collegiate and the Faculties of Medicine and Arts at the University of Toronto. There is also a file on Davidson’s summer project in 1907 to earn money for his Bachelor of Arts program, prospecting in the Temagami Forest Reserve.

Correspondence

There are two correspondents with Davidson Black in this series: his mother, Margaret, and, especially, his wife, Adena. There are large gaps in the letters received from his mother. There are scattered letters for the years 1905, 1908, 1912 and 1920. A substantial number exist only for the years 1921 to 1927.

More of Adena’s letters to Davidson have survived. In the early years of their relationship, she numbered her letters; 95 numbered ones (along with several unnumbered ones and postcards) were written between 24 July 1912 and the end of 1913. Only one, #80, is missing here. After their marriage, the number of letters Adena wrote to Davidson fell off sharply, but not as sharply as the gaps in this series would indicate. There are only four letters for 1914, all written in January (they were together for most of the year, including their trip to Europe), and none thereafter until 1920. This means there are no letters for the period when Davidson was on active service during World War I (June 1917 to January 1919). There is only one letter present for 1920, none for 1921, and five for 1922. For the next, decade, until August 1933, there are a good number of letters, as the Blacks were often separated for weeks or months at a time.

The remainder of this series contains letters sent to and/or received from relatives and friends, including Professor J. J. R. Macleod; his file also contains one his hand-painted Christmas cards.

Personal

Davidson Black kept a diary throughout much of his adult life. There are 28 volumes in this series. The earliest is for 1902, the year he entered medicine at the University of Toronto; it includes a tally of monthly expenses. The last diary is for 1934, the final entry being for 9 March, six days before his death. For each of the years 1922 and 1925, there are two volumes of diaries. There are no diaries present for the years 1907, 1908, 1909, 1911, and 1912. The diary Davidson kept while on active service during World War I is filed with his service records in Series 4. Most of the entries are brief as the diaries, except for 1902, are small. Some of the loose entries with the diaries are longer.

A number of items document his personal activities. The earliest is a small well-thumbed copy of 'The Book of Common Prayer', presented to him by his mother on his 9th birthday in 1893. A notebook, a journal, and permits document his early interest in ornithology. Finally, there are files of memorabilia, poems and sketches, and on honours bestowed on him later in life, along with twelve diplomas and certificates.

Records relating to faculty and other academic staff

Series consists of seven sub-series. The first three sub-series contain records of teaching staff, organized under three different filing methods: by general category (1944-1969), by name of individual staff member (1971-1987), and by department (1971-1986). Series four and five contain files on teaching assistants (1977-1982) and Fellows of Victoria College (1976-1986) respectively. The sixth series contains three files relating to staff promotions (1972-1979) and salary equalization (1974) and the seventh files relating to academic appointments and faculty, 1976-1992.

Files on University of Toronto bodies

Series consists of files relating to the Principal's participation in University of Toronto bodies, 1970-1991, including: University Wide Committee on Governance, 1970-1971; New Programme Review Committee, 1972-1973; Inter-College Council (Committee), 1970-1973; Collegiate Board, 1974-1979; and, the Principal, Deans and Directors group, 1972-1977.

Results 151 to 200 of 2785