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Correspondence

This small series contains correspondence, largely of a professional nature and substantially relating to Professor Goudge's activities at the University of Toronto. The topics range from his employment and honours bestowed on him, to matters relating to his students and their academic work, to duties stemming from his sitting on the boards of academic journals. The arrangement is largely by these three groups.

The correspondence in the first files includes offers of employment generally (1934-1970), and employment at the University of Toronto along with annuities, academic leave, and honours, including Goudge's festschrift (1942-1981). Then come files on the supervision of students and the appraisal of doctoral theses (1946-1981) and letters of support for fellowships and scholarships (1967-1985). There is little correspondence relating to the development of administrative policies at the University, though there is a submission by Professor Goudge, in his capacity as chair of the Department of Philosophy, to the Macpherson Committee in 1966.

One of Professor Goudge's long-time friends was A. G. Huntsman, Professor of Marine Biology, with whom he carried on a lengthy (1958-1970) correspondence on philosophical issues relating to science and evolution. This file is followed by one containing Goudge's recollections of his association with A. N. Whitehead at Harvard and the University of Toronto in the 1930s. Professor Huntsman's personal records, which are in the University Archives, complement this correspondence.

The remainder of this series contains correspondence relating to Goudge's involvement with the American Philosophical Association, the Charles S. Peirce Society, the 1979 "Philosophy in Canada" conference, the Royal Society of Canada, and the journals, Dialogue, Encyclopedie Philosophique, Encyclopedia of Philosophy, The Monist, and Philosophy of the Social Sciences.

Publications

Records in this series relate to Cochrane’s publishing of books, articles and reviews. Included are manuscripts, correspondence, research notes, clippings, published reviews and off-prints. For his first major book, Thucydides and the Science of History (1929), there is only one file containing reviews, comments and some correspondence.

For his most renowned work, Christianity and Classical Culture (1940) there is no manuscript, although two sets of galley proofs have survived. There is some correspondence relating to the book and copies of numerous reviews, including some from important scholars such as George Grant, Arnaldo Momigliano, R.M. Henry, Shirley Jackson Case, W.H. Auden and Reinhold Neibuhr.

Photographs

This series contains photographs and slides from various swimming events. Many of the photographs appear to have been used by Thierry in issues of Swim News, or for the creation of swimmer biographies and profiles in media guides. The photographers and the events being documented are only clearly identified for some of the images. Some of the photographs are attributed to Marco Chiesa.

Correspondence

This series contains, in addition to letters, a wide range of material associated with the ongoing production of the Atlas: notes, memoranda, reports, brochures, partial drafts of the manuscript, photoprints and maps. The arrangement is generally chronological, except where otherwise noted.

Manuscripts and publications

Professor Dean, in collaboration with his colleagues on the Atlas project, began speaking and writing about it almost as soon as it began. These addresses and articles helped maintain scholarly interest in the project as it proceeded and also created a wider public awareness. Both are reflected in the reviews that the Atlas received, and the articles that were written about it, particularly after the Leipzig prize was awarded.

Personal correspondence

This series consists of chronologically arranged, incoming personal correspondence, documenting Ms. Walker’s personal life from 1936 to 1998. Correspondents include family, friends, Hart House Theatre colleagues, sorority sisters and fine art students. Major correspondents are: Burgon Bickersteth, Pat Carson, Norman Endicott, Robert Gill and James Reaney. The letters, mostly written in the 1950’s, document Ms. Walker’s friendships, romances, interest in theatre, and travels throughout Europe.

Hart House Theatre

Marion Walker was Production Assistant at Hart House Theatre from 1946 to 1957. Under the directorship of Robert Gill, she designed sets and costumes for each of the Theatre’s annual four plays. Her first production was St. Joan, starring Charmian King. Other early performers who worked with Ms. Walker at Hart House Theatre included Kate Reid, Donald Sutherland, and William Hutt.

The records in this series pertain to Ms. Walker’s involvement with Hart House Theatre. Textual records include scripts 1946, annotated Hart House Theatre programmes 1946 – 1957, and obituaries for Robert Gill, 1974.

Series also includes approximately 100 photographs of various productions for which Ms. Walker designed costumes and sets. The photographs depict various scenes, actors and set designs. Productions represented are: Romeo and Juliet, 1947; Julius Caesar, 1948; the Seagull, 1948; The Skin of Our Teeth, 1948, The Doctor’s Dilemma, 1948; Crime and Punishment, 1949; Othello, 1949; Fortune My Foe, 1950; The Guardsman, 1950; Captain Brassbound’s Conversion, 1950; Medea, 1950; Henry IV, 1950; Marco Millions, 1950; Richard II, 1951; Pygmalion, 1951; The Madwoman of Chaillot, 1951; The Admirable Crichton, 1952; The Winslow Boy, 1952; Macbeth, 1952; The Wild Duck, 1953; The School for Wives, 1956; and The Innocent, 1957.

Series also contains 8 sketchbooks of costume designs for the following Hart House productions: The Internal Machine, 1946; Othello, 1949; Medea, 1950; Richard II, 1951; School for Wives, 1956; Hamlet, [n.d.]; and King Lear, [n.d.].

Personal/Family

Consists of family biographical information on the Rhodes ancestry, submissions to American and Canadian Who’s Who volumes

Correspondence

This series contains general correspondence files arranged chronologically, and separate individual files arranged alphabetically by correspondent. General files include correspondence relating to his early education at the University of Edinburgh, appointments in Scotland and England, and appointment to the School of Hygiene, University of Toronto. Individual correspondents include, among others, faculty members at the University of Toronto such as Dr. Morris Goldner, Dr. John Hastings, Prof. Hannah Farkas-Himsley, Dr. W. Harding le Riche, former students, professional associates and personal friends.

Church of St. Leonard, Toronto

Dr. Rhodes was Vestry Clerk for Church of St. Leonard (Anglican Church of Canada) for ten years (1980 to 1990). His wife, Harriet, was a member of the Outreach Committee. The series consists of annual reports, budgets, minutes of meetings and some correspondence with the Reverend J. Taylor Pryce.

Laboratory Services Branch, Ministry of Health

This series documents Dr. Rhodes employment with the Ontario Ministry of Health as Associate Medical Director and later Medical Director of the Laboratory Services Branch, including appointment negotiations in 1969 to his retirement in 1977. Dr. Rhodes joined the Laboratory Services Branch following his resignation as Director of the School of Hygiene in 1970.
Files consistent of general correspondence and subject files relating to Autoclaving, Disinfectants in the TB Laboratory, Report of the Technical Advisory Committee on Laboratory Safety, Immunization and surveillance and Task force on care and transportation of communicable disease cases.

Ministry of Natural Resources. Rabies Advisory Committee

In 1979 Dr. Rhodes accepted an appointment as Chairman of the Rabies Advisory Committee within the Ministry of Natural Resources. This series documents some of the activities of this committee focusing primarily on immunization against rabies nationally and internationally. Included are general correspondence relating mainly to his appointment and reappointment to this committee and his retirement, and subject files relating to the World Health Organization conference in Essen, Germany, oral immunization of wildlife, safety standards and a seminar in Maple, Ontario on “Public, Intra- and Inter-Agency Relations in Rabies Control programs: a review”

Photographs

Photographs of Dr. Rhodes at various professional meetings and functions. There are also several portraits of Dr. Rhodes in his office and at his desk as well as passport shots of himself and his wife Harriette.

Talks and addresses

This series contains copies of talks and addresses by Prof. French at professional meetings, symposia, and conferences. They are arranged chronologically and cover such research topics as upper atmospheric mass spectroscopy, the Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyser (TAGA), satellite aerodynamics, molecular beams and ion clustering. Not all talks were scientific in nature. Prof. French was often asked to speak about the role of engineering in space exploration and the relationship between university engineering research and industry as well as the commercialization of scientific applications. Historical talks include a paper on Canadian post-war aerospace development, a 1968 talk on Canadian development in space research, as well as papers telling the story of key scientific innovation such as the story on how TAGA and SCIEX came about and the role of the University of Toronto Innovation Foundation.

Memos

This series is one file of memos mainly written by Prof. Prentice dealing with issues within the Department of History and Philosophy at the Ontario Institute of Studies in Education. Memos document Prentice’s views on staffing, research direction, and courses being offered.

Letters of recommendation

This series includes both requests received by Prof. Prentice for recommendations for former students and colleagues as well as her responses to these requests.

Student days

This series documents Alison Prentice’s days as a student at Smith College (B.A. 1955), while attending the Ontario College of Education ca. 1958 and during her Ph.D. studies in history at the University of Toronto.

B1999-0017 includes essays and papers written while a student at Smith College as well as field essays written as part of her Ph.D. comprehensive examinations at the University of Toronto. These are arranged chronologically.

B2009-0010 contains her correspondence home to her parents while a student at Smith College and during one year at the University of Geneva (1951-1955)

Manuscripts and publications

In the summer of 1983 Professor Barbeau was invited to write an article on mathematical problems for the alumni magazine, University of Toronto Graduate. Thirty-eight columns appeared between September 1984 and the summer of 1993. Associated with it
was the newsletter, After Aftermath, also compiled by Barbeau. Each column contained a cryptic crossword and posed a mathematical problem and, over the years, it drew responses from several hundred readers, including about two dozen “regulars”. The columns were assembled in book format and published as After Math: puzzles and brainteasers in 1995. This column, the resulting correspondence, and the newsletter form the bulk of this series.

Other publications in this series are, in chronological order, The Mathematical Oak, a newsletter of the Department of Mathematics edited by Professor Barbeau between 1986 and 1992; Polynomials (1989), a course book “designed to stand between the high school
and university curricula”2; Power Play (1997), the focus of which is power of numbers; a paper co-authored with P. C. Stangeby, “Some foundations of analysis for engineering science (MAT194F)” (2002); reviews of Pell’s Equations (2003); and a copy of a manuscript by Don Patterson, “University of Toronto – Honours Mathematics and Physics and Chemistry, 1927-1931; some memories as of December 1993.”

The files may contain correspondence, notes, drafts of manuscripts, page proofs, printed columns and newsletters.

Sound recordings

These sound tapes were given to Professor Barbeau by Professor Warwick Sawyer at the time of his retirement in the 1970s. Includes two 1964 lectures by professor Edward F. Assmus, Jr. (1931–1998) on Algebraic Coding Theory as well as a talk by Harvard Mathematics Professor Garrett Birkhoff (1911-1996) on the history of computing math. All three lectures were possibly for the same event in February 1964 “lecture to AYI”.

Questionnaire

In 1993, Ms. Heaton conducted a mail survey to medical school library directors to gather information on reference services. This series consists of records documenting the questionnaire such as correspondence, draft questionnaires, and raw data. The series has been divided into subseries.

Visits and interviews

Ms. Heaton followed up the questionnaire with visits and interviews to selected medical libraries in Canada and the United States. This series consists of correspondence and notes concerning these interviews. Also included are 28 photographs of libraries visited.

Publications

Ms. Heaton wrote numerous articles as a result of the questionnaire and interview. This series contains manuscripts and correspondence related to these publications.

Sound recordings and Videos

Series consist of sounds recordings of Dr. Rakoff speaking at conferences, on radio programs, and at university lectures. They include addresses, interviews, talks and discussions regarding various topics related to mental illness, primarily psychiatry. Videos include a filmed interview with Dr. Rakoff and a documentary on adolescence.

Teaching

Series consists of records relating to Dr. Franklin’s teaching duties. One course in particular is very well documented – JAM 2012: Ancient Materials. According to Dr. Franklin, this course was quite innovative. It was intended for incoming graduate students in Anthropology or Materials Engineering, taught through the School of Graduate Studies. The respective departments – Archeology and Anthropology and Materials Engineering MMS - carried the JAM courses in their calendars. The students worked together in pairs, one student from each discipline. In contrast to the usual joint courses taught by different staff members in a sequence of individually-taught sections, the JAM courses were truly co-taught, i.e. both instructors were present at all sessions, which consisted of annotated conversation between two professionals, linking theory and practice.

Records in the series include course and project descriptions, exam questions, lecture notes, and student projects. The series also includes an extensive collection of teaching aids, including teaching slides (depicting museum/archaeological artifacts), 4 boxes of micrographs, and several boxes of artifacts used in instruction, including various rocks, Chinese spade coins, Canadian coins and stamps, and metal samples.

This series also contains 2 files on students who were supervised by Dr. Franklin.

Ursula Franklin Academy

Series consists of records relating to Ursula Franklin Academy, a secondary school operated by the Toronto District School Board and founded in 1995. The school originally operated out of the former Brockton High School and moved to Western Technical-Commercial School in 2002. The school was named after Dr. Franklin and is modeled on her vision of education.

Records in this series primarily document the founding and early days of the school, including correspondence, information packages, and materials from the school opening. Some files relate to the school’s ongoing activities, and conversations about education method, as documented in newsletters, event notices, and some correspondence. Series also includes matted photographs from the opening of the school, including photographs of Dr. Franklin with Jane Jacobs.

Professional Associations and Societies

This series reflects Professor Roots’ involvement in professional associations and societies. Material included in this series is correspondence, organizational documents (constitutions, financial records, etc.), newsletters, meeting minutes, financial statements, membership applications, and notes. Nearly half of the material consists of Dr. Roots’ involvement with the Young Naturalist Foundation.

Administration

This series reflects Professor Roots’ involvement with academic administration and academic committees within the Zoology Department as well as the larger University of Toronto. This series includes notes, correspondence, reports and documents related Roots’ role as chair of the zoology department, promotions Roots was involved in, the organization of symposiums and retreats, departmental reviews, budgeting, staffing and re-organizing the zoology department, and handling cases of academic misconduct.

Travel

Series consists of records relating to 2 trips taken by Dr. Franklin: her return to Berlin in 1969 for the World Peace Congress, and her trip to China in 1981 for the International Conference of Early Metallurgy. See subseries descriptions for more information.

Heidelberg

Between October 1902 and May 1904, Dr. Farrar took leave from Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital for post graduate medical training in Europe. Although he traveled widely, attending lectures and meeting scientists in Munich, Paris and London, Dr. Farrar spent most of his time at Emil Kraepelin’s psychiatric clinic in Heidelberg. There, Dr. Kraepelin had revolutionized modern psychiatric diagnosis. Kraepelin, along with his Heidelberg colleagues, Franz Nissl and Aloys Alzheimer, rejected the nineteenth century practice of reducing mental illness to brain disease. Instead, the Heidelberg School emphasized careful description and clear understanding of individual symptoms in psychiatric diagnosis. When Dr. Farrar returned from Heidleberg in 1904, he had received thorough training in Kraepelin’s psychological approach. He also returned mindful of the Heidelberg School’s emphasis upon brain histopathology, neurohistology, and neuropathology.

The records in this series pertain to Dr. Farrar’s personal and professional activities in Heidelberg. Records consist of a personal diary, research notes and patient observations. Also included is personal correspondence from various Heidelberg colleagues such as Franz Nissl, Emil Kraepelin, Albert Deveaux, and Charles Macfie Campbell. Photographs include mainly snapshots taken by Farrar of the German towns and countryside, of his colleagues at Heidelberg, and of the university and his personal study.

In addition, this series also contains glass slides, printing plates, a gravity measuring device, and a knife for preparing brain tissues for slides. During his Heidelberg studies, Dr. Farrar, along with Franz Nissl and Aloys Alzheimer, became occupied with the microscopic study of brain disease. Dr. Farrar prepared these slides under Dr. Nissl’s supervision.

For photographs, see Box /003P (09).

Department of Soldier’s Civil Re-establishment

This series documents Dr. Farrar’s work with the Canadian Federal Department of Soldier’s Civil Re-establishment. In 1916, Dr. Farrar joined the Canadian army. Initially posted to a hospital unit in Kingston, Ontario, he was transferred to Ottawa for duty in the Military Hospitals Commission. Dr. Farrar would eventually become Chief Psychiatrist in the Federal Department of Soldier’s Civil Re-establishment. In this capacity, he treated invalided soldiers suffering from psychiatric illnesses including shell shock. Though primarily based in Ottawa during the war, Dr. Farrar also worked out of the military hospital in Cobourg, Ontario, a photograph of which can be found in /003P(11). Records in this series consist of professional correspondence, reports, patient files, plans for a military hospital. There are also lantern slides depicting hospitals and asylums throughout North America in the early 1900s. It is believed that Dr. Farrar may have collected and used these images in his capacity as Chief Psychiatrist to put forth a proposal for a new military hospital.

Toronto Psychiatric Hospital and University of Toronto Department of Psychiatry

In 1926, Dr. C.K. Clark recruited Dr. Farrar as medical director of the newly built Toronto Psychiatric Hospital and as head of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Toronto. Dr. Farrar remained in these positions until his retirement in 1947. Between 1926 and 1947, Canadian psychiatry became a major center in international scientific circles. Indeed, under Dr. Farrar’s tenure, the Toronto Psychiatric Hospital became a university teaching hospital and developed a clinical service for teaching and research. Further, in 1932, Dr. Farrar initiated the first Canadian postgraduate program for physicians in psychiatry. The program was broadly based and was accepted by the University as leading to a Diploma in Psychiatry.

Records in this series document Dr. Farrar’s career at the Toronto Psychiatric Hospital and the University of Toronto Department of Psychiatry. This series has been divided into three sub-series to reflect the administrative, clinical, and teaching activities of Dr. Farrar’s joint appointment.

Research and publications

In addition to editing the American Journal of Psychiatry, Dr. Farrar was also on the editorial boards of J.K. Hall, ed. American Psychiatry (1844-1944) (New York Columbia University Press, 1944), Funk and Wagnall’s New Encyclopedia (New York: Funk and Wagnall, 1932), and the Yearbook of Neurology and Psychiatry (Chicago: Year Book Publishers, 1907). Further, although he never wrote a book, Dr. Farrar wrote 77 articles. 29 appeared in the American Journal of Psychiatry and 48 were printed in other journals and periodicals. He also wrote 273 book reviews for the AJP between 1908 and 1965.

The records in this series pertain to Dr. Farrar’s various research and publication activities. This series, however, does not document Dr. Farrrar’s editorial work with the American Journal of Psychiatry. Series records include correspondence with authors, editors, and research foundations. Series also consists of research notes, subject files on various topics, and bibliographic card indices. Also included are manuscripts by Adolf Meyer and Jack Hannah. In addition, this series also contains artifacts Dr. Farrar used in his research such as glass slides, printing plates, a gravity measuring device, and a knife for preparing brain tissues for slides.

Portrait collection

This series is Farrar’s collection of photographs of colleagues and historical medical and scientific personalities. Some photographs are originals and were autographed for Dr. Farrar. Others are reproductions of printed images or paintings. Many of these images would have been displayed in his office and home study. A few notable include Canadian doctors Frederick Banting and William Osler, colleague J.G. FitzGerald and Mary Jackson, Farrar’s mentor C.K. Clarke, American colleagues Edward Brush, Lewellis Barker and famous European psychiatrists such as Adolf Meyer, Emil Kraeplin and Franz Nissl. There is a detailed list to this series. Images that have been autographed are marked with an **.

Most of these images have been removed from frames and consequently some were accompanied by textual information. In such cases, the textual information was either transcribed on the bottom left hand corner of the file folder or preserved and removed to box /042.

Research

This series begins with a folder of reports prepared by Dr. Till on his research and intended primarily for internal administrative use, for notation in academic journals, for entries in volumes such as Canadian Who’s Who and, latterly, online sources. The years covered are 1987-2001.
The remaining files contain correspondence, notes, drafts of reports and support material for the following areas of research: growth models, ‘stochastic models of population growth’, repression genetics, and Iceland and privacy legislation, associated with which is a copy Evangeline Racha’s master’s thesis for Stanford University, “Iceland’s decode genetics: bellwether for population genomics research” (2001). The ‘stochastic models’ file relates to the early famous paper by Drs. Till, McCulloch and Siminovitch and contains correspond-ence and notes, with related papers, between Drs. Till and W. A. O’N. Waugh for the years 1963 to1967.

Consulting

Professor Fuss has served as a consultant to government and industry for many years, but only two projects are documented in this series, his work as a member of the Price Measurement Advisory Committee at Statistics Canada and a study he did for United Communications Ltd. on long distance telephone service in Canada.

Family correspondence

Note from Bliss: "These files include extensive correspondence with my mother; some correspondence with my brother, J.Q. Bliss, who died in 1969; much correspondence regarding my young brother, R.Q. Bliss; letters from members of Elizabeth Bliss's family; and the beginnings of correspondence with our children."

Correspondence

Series consists of incoming and outgoing correspondence between Dr. Franklin and friends, family, colleagues, government officials, and others. Correspondence pertains to the full scope of Dr. Franklin’s life and work, including her academic work, her political activism, and her personal life.

Scholarly papers

In addition to published works, Prof. Richardson made numerous presentations at conferences, symposia, invited lectures, memorials, convocations, and other occasions. The papers contained in this series were, for the most part, prepared for academic and other scholarly activities such as meetings of associations like the Society for Biblical Literature, Canadian Society of Biblical Studies, Canadian Society for the Study of Religion and the SNTS and represent a significant portion of Prof. Richardson’s body of work. Other presentations were made at many Canadian universities as invited lecturer and to various groups at the University of Toronto. A few files contain papers submitted, but never published. Indeed, many of these presentations are on topics that formed the basis of future publications. Researchers are therefore referred to Series 10 for topics of written works not represented in this series.

Files may contain correspondence, manuscripts, and notes.

Problem sets and examinations

The problem sets in this series were used by Satterly while teaching at the University of Toronto. The files are arranged in chronological order by academic year and term. Annotated examinations are scattered throughout the records. A personal bound copy of all of Satterly's examinations is filed at thend of this series and includes an introductory note him. These examinations are often heavily annotated. At the end of this series are a number of files of a more general nature on miscellaneous mathematical problems.

Records from two of the four accessions are found in this series.

Working files

Series consists of files relating to special projects carried out by the members and staff of the New Catholic Times, including the development of a mission statement in 1993, a readership survey, the reorganization of the corporation's structure in 1989, and a proposal for purchasing street boxes from which to sell the newspaper. Series is arranged chronologically. A list of files is available.

Audio-visual materials

Series consists of photographs of members and staff of the New Catholic Times, including negatives and contact prints, and a sound recording of a talk given by Monika Hellwig, LL.B., Ph.D., on Catholic Education. Photographs depict members, staff, and guests of the New Catholic Times working or posing at their desk, in meetings, or attending events including conferences or presentations, a picnic, a party, and a peace demonstration. A list of items is available.

Documents of the Secretary, North American Committee

The series consists of a copy of the original list of the Faith and Sharing Federation fonds produced by Madeleine Seguin, August 15, 1994. Also includes documents relating to the deposit of records to Archives Deschalets, Ottawa, in 1993-1994 and the donation of the records to University of St. Michael’s College in 2004.

Séguin, Madeleine

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