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University of St. Michael's College, John M. Kelly Library, Special Collections Item
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7846, a happy New Year

Item consists of 1 embossed picture postcard with a divided back with New Years greetings and deers. The postcard has 1 Benjamin Franklin one cent U.S. postage stamp.

9. "Les luttes a l'Arche"

Item consists of 1 audio cassette featuring a Covenant Retreat (Retraite de l'Alliance) in April 1984, with talks by Pere M.D. Philippe, O.P. The title of the retreat was, "L'Alliance et le mystere de la croix."

A Christmas wish

Item consists of 1 embossed picture postcard with a divided back with Christmas greetings. The postcard has 1 Benjamin Franklin one cent U.S. postage stamp.

A bright and happy Easter

Item consists of 1 embossed picture postcard with a divided back of a chick pulling a carriage with pink flowers and an egg. The postcard has 1 Benjamin Franklin one cent U.S. postage stamp.

A contemporary monastic experience

Item consists of a typescript of "A Contemporary Monastic Experience", a talk given on Holy Thursday. Nouwen describes the death and resurrection of Jesus, not so much as an event that happened in the past, but as the Christ event that is being realized in us in the unfolding liturgical year. Living the liturgical year in the monastery allows one to 'live' the event without as many illusions about God or self, primarily because of the desert-like quality of monastic life.

A critical analysis

This item consists of a 4 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled ‘A Critical Analysis’ published in Ave Maria National Catholic Weekly, 3 June 1967, p. 11-13, 30. Nouwen discusses the rise and popularity of the Pentecostal movement at Notre Dame University in Indiana and states that the article ‘is an attempt to clarify certain issues and to be of some help in an honest evaluation’. Nouwen looks at the phenomenon from three perspectives: 1) A Historical Perspective: He writes of the past and current religious atmosphere at Notre Dame. Here he credits an article by Killian McDonnell. O.S.B. (The Ecumenical Significance of the Pentecostal Movement) where there is a discussion of the ‘sobriety’ and ‘objectivity’ of Roman Catholic liturgy in contrast to the more emotional freedom and sense of belonging in the Pentecostal services. Nouwen suggests that this latter may answer a need in the new more ambitious and competitive atmosphere at the university. 2) A Psychological Perspective. Here Nouwen asks how we can evaluate this new movement by asking several questions: Does it heal or hurt? He suggests that evidence leads to a conclusion that while there may be a short term benefit ‘it is very doubtful that it will cure deep mental suffering’. He also asks ‘Can it be dangerous’? He states that ‘for those who are not prepared every inducement of a strong emotion can break and do serious harm. He also suggests that for those who do not receive the ‘gifts’ such as tongues or joy there then may be the question ‘what is wrong with me’. This leads to the need for direction, guidance and care. Finally he asks: Does it create community? Nouwen suggests that the powerful emotions of belonging and sharing, may risk creating a community that is inward and elitist. ‘the Pentecostal movement creates a situation of oneness and togetherness, which makes the community highly self-centered and hinders the development of the autonomous Christian…’. 3) A Theological Perspective: here Nouwen is asking if the Pentecostal movement is reflecting the theological developments of Vatican II and suggests that it may not meet the new stress on incarnational theology. He concludes the article by stating: ‘the new wave of Pentecostalism at Notre Dame University obviously answers a burning need in many students. It worries many who are concerned about the effects on the mental health of some…It places heavy responsibility on the leaders of the movement, and it disturbs many theologians’ but it also offers a chance to come to a new realization of the crucial importance of the valid religious experience – as an authentic part of the Christian life’.

A cry for mercy: prayers from the Genesee

Item consists of a book of prayers which Nouwen wrote during his six-month stay, February to August 1979, with the Trappist Monks of the Abbey of the Genesee in upstate New York. The book has been divided into the following: Prologue; I February-March: A fearful heart; II March-April: A cry for mercy; III April-May: Rays of hope; IV May-June: The power of the Spirit; V June-July: The needs of the world; VI July-August: A grateful heart; Epilogue.
As is stated on the back cover: "These contemporary prayers speak powerfully of one man's search for a closer relationship with his God and of his struggle to confront his own inner turmoil."

A different accent

Item consists of a book which features Nouwen in a chapter "Peace", subtitled "Living peace" dated April 28, 1983 and beginning on p. 35.

A dream after cardiac surgery

Item consists of an offprint of an article called "A dream after cardiac surgery" by Paul W. Pruyser. The article is about the author's recollection and analysis of a dream he had after undergoing cardiac surgery.

A dry roof and a cow: dreams and portraits of our neighbours

Item consists of a pamphlet in which Nouwen has written the introduction, stating: "The people portrayed in the book 'are in touch with something larger than a wish for a gift from a stranger who might come along and show pity on them. They are in touch with a dream that makes them visionaries of a new future.'"

A dry roof and a cow: dreams and portraits of our neighbours

Item consists of a book in which Nouwen has written the introduction, stating in part: "I trust that, as we let the words and images in this book penetrate our hearts, we will experience a deep desire to do whatever possible to make the dream of a worldwide community of love and peace become a reality."

A glad Christmas

Item consists of 1 embossed picture postcard with a divided back with a Christmas greeting and a dog. The postcard has 1 Benjamin Franklin one cent U.S. postage stamp.

A glimpse behind the mirror: reflections on death and life

This item is an 11 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled, ‘A Glimpse behind the Mirror: Reflections on Death and Life’ published in Weavings, A Journal of the Christian Spiritual Life, Vol. IV, No. 6, November/December 1989, PP. 13 – 23. This article is about Nouwen’s experience with possible death after a road accident. Nouwen begins the article by describing the accident, his experience of the hospital emergency room and intensive care ward. Nouwen describes his gradual awareness that he might die; that he was at peace. ‘I kept thinking that dying was quite possible and that I had to prepare myself and my friends for it. And so I let myself enter a place I had never been before: the portal of death.’ Nouwen describes his experience of the presence of the love of Jesus and his deep sense of wanting to make the journey of dying to life. Nouwen is hesitant however because he knows there are relationships unhealed and forgiveness not yet given nor received. Nouwen slowly realizes that he will not die and believes that he has work to do. ‘I believe that I am asked to proclaim the love God in a new way.’ Pondering the way Jesus was in the world Nouwen asks, ‘Can I become like Jesus and witness to what I have seen? Yes, I can live in God and speak to the human reality’. Nouwen concludes the article with a quote from Phil. 1:21 -26, words of Paul that Nouwen hopes will be his guide.

A glimpse of the "gay world" in San Francisco & the "fast world" in Los Angeles: struggling to remain anchored in Jesus

This item is a 5 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled, ‘Struggling to remain anchored in Jesus, published in the New Oxford Review, July-August 1987, pp. 5 – 9. This item is part 10 and the final installment of a series of articles written during the year that Nouwen was resident at L’Arche, Trosly-Breuil , France. The items date from May 31, 1986 to July 6, 1986. The first entry describes a visit Henri and a friend make to the Castro district of San Francisco, a gay area. He writes of seeing the fearful, lonely faces of men struggling with the awareness of AIDS. Nouwen concludes the entry stating that his friend commented, ‘I am glad you came. There are too few people who mention his Name in the district. There are so many negative associations with his Name and still he is the greatest source of hope.’ The next entry describes his visit to Los Angeles and the atmosphere of what he describes as ‘the enormous superficiality of our culture’. Nouwen then flies to Madison, Wisconsin for a visit with Parker and Sally Palmer to discuss theological education and a possible one-week summer institute for seminary professors. Palmer and Nouwen discuss the need for theological students to have spiritual help, not to separate theology and spirituality. Nouwen notes that: ‘the study of theology must have the quality of prayer; theological study must also foster the creation of communities of faith… and finally, the study of theology must always lead to witness’. The final three entries are written when Nouwen returns to France and finds himself assessing his year there. He writes of wanting to share with Nathan but having to wait to do that, he notes that he feels scattered and finds it hard to pray for an hour in the morning, he is not sleeping well and feels ‘somewhat indifferent’ but not depressed. Nouwen realizes that he has not really got to know the handicapped people as well as he hoped. In the last entry Nouwen notes that he is leaving Trosly, will visit his family, go to Boston and then on to Daybreak for a three year commitment. He notes three graces from his time at L’Arche: being in Europe again, renewing and making friendships, and beginning to make a deeper contact with the handicapped.

A happy Christmas

Item consists of 1 embossed picture postcard with a divided back of chimes and holly. The postcard has 1 Edward VII one cent Canada postage stamp.

A happy Christmas tide

Item consists of 1 embossed picture postcard with a divided back of a Christmas greeting with a calendar date and holly. The postcard has 1 Benjamin Franklin one cent U.S. postage stamp.

A happy Easter

Item consists of 1 embossed picture postcard with a divided back of baby birds and eggs within a wicker basket with some blue flowers and cotton. The postcard has 1 series of 1902 Franklin one cent stamp.

A happy Easter

Item consists of 1 picture postcard with a divided back from the Raphael Tuck & Son's "Easter Fancies" series, no. 763, with a boy feeding a rabbit. The postcard has 1 George Washington one cent U.S. postage stamp.

A happy New Year

Item consists of 1 embossed picture postcard from the Raphael Tuck & Sons' "New Year Greetings" series, no. 600, with a divided back of a girl with flowers and a clock. The postcard has 1 George Washington one cent U.S. postage stamp.

A happy New Year

Item consists of 1 embossed picture postcard with a divided back with a New Years greeting. The postcard has 1 Benjamin Franklin one cent U.S. postage stamp.

A joyful Christmas

Item consists of 1 embossed picture postcard with a divided back of red poinsettias. The postcard has 1 Benjamin Franklin one cent U.S. postage stamp.

A joyful Christmas

Item consists of 1 novelty picture postcard with a divided back of an angel with coloured in flowers. The postcard has 1 Benjamin Franklin one cent U.S. postage stamp.

A joyful Eastertide

Item consists of 1 embossed picture postcard with an undivided back with Easter greetings and a scene of cattle by a windmill. The postcard has 1 series of 1902 Franklin one cent stamp.

A joyful Eastertide

Item consists of 1 embossed picture postcard with a divided back from the Raphael Tuck & Sons' "Easter Post Cards" series, no. 703, with Easter greetings. The postcard has 1 series of 1902 Franklin one cent stamp.

A joyous Easter

Item consists of 1 embossed picture postcard with a divided back of purple flowers and an Easter greeting. The postcard has 1 George Washington one cent U.S. postage stamp.

A letter of consolation

Item consists of a book which Nouwen wrote as a letter of consolation to his father six months after the death of Henri's mother.

A life through Adam

This item is an article by Henri Nouwen entitled, ‘A Life Through Adam’ published in British edition of The Reader’s Digest, September 1990, pp. 75 -77. This item is a slightly revised version of the article published in the January 1990 U.S. edition of The Reader’s Digest (see item 1753). This item is condensed from an article published in Weavings, March/April 1988. Nouwen begins by stating that he has recently moved from academia to living at the l’Arche community of Daybreak with men and women who have mental disabilities. He describes being assigned to help a very severely handicapped man named Adam. Nouwen describes his daily routine with the totally helpless 25 year old man and his growing awareness that Adam was doing more for him than he for Adam. ‘This severely handicapped young man, whom outsiders sometimes describe with very hurtful words, started to become my dearest companion’. Nouwen goes on to describe the very special effect Adam has on the people with whom he lives and the peace that, because of Adam’s need, helps them to work together.

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