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Archival description
University of Toronto Archives and Records Management Services Series
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Associations

This series reflects Professor Bay’s involvement in the American Political Science Association and its radical Caucus for a New Political Science which was formed by 200 dissident political scientists, of which Professor Bay was one, at the September, 1967 meeting of the APSA. Bay was president from 1971 to 1972. Material included is minutes of meetings, correspondence, newsletters, memos, and election material. Some material related to addresses presented at panels and conferences can be found in this series. Related material may also be located in the correspondence series.

Publications and manuscripts

This series reflects Professor Bay’s research interests that were published in academic journals, as well as sources for public consumption such as magazines and newsletters. The material in this series includes tributes, letters to the editor, commentaries, and publications (books, book chapters, and articles). Related material is arranged with the corresponding manuscript which may include documents such as correspondence, drafts, publication releases, and royalty statements. Additional correspondence related to publications and manuscripts may be located in the correspondence series.

Addresses

This series reflects Bay’s research interests that were expressed through addresses as presentations for academic conferences and public lectures. Related material, such as correspondence and drafts, are arranged with the corresponding address. Additional material related to addresses presented at panels and conferences can be found in the professional associations series. Additional correspondence related to addresses may be located in the correspondence series.

Academia and teaching materials

This series documents some of Professor Bay’s academic and associated activities. It includes teaching material (reading lists, syllabi, lectures, and exams) and his work within academia (committee work, appraisals and references, and departmental involvement) at the various universities where he taught. The files on “referees and appraisals” at the University of Toronto include references for academics and students and comments on books and articles forwarded to him for his input. Also included are files on the proposal to abolish the death penalty in California and, in particular, the attempt to stop the execution of convicted murderer and rapist, Caryl Chessman; and copies of "Key List Mailing: Selected Documents of Current and Lasting Interest in the Civil Rights Movement", a biweekly publication produced by the San Francisco Regional Office of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).

Additional material related to academia and teaching material may be located in the correspondence series. Material related to his research in addresses and publications is located in the publications series. Material related to his involvement in professional associations can be found in the professional association series.

Research material

This series consists of offprints were sent to Professor Bay as a research material and were annotated. This material may reflect Professor Bay’s research interests as well as his commentaries on other academic’s publications. Additional material reflecting Professor Bay’s commentary on the professional field may be located in the referees and appraisal material in the academia and teaching material series and also in the book reviews of the publications and manuscript series.

Correspondence

This series contains letters written to Professor Bay by members of his family and friends, as well as professional correspondence. The correspondence is largely personal in nature in early years but becomes mainly professional in later years. The material includes replies sent by Bay. Approximately a third to half of the material is written in Norwegian.

Boxes B2014-0010/006-/038 were arranged by Professor Bay. This arrangement consists of grouping correspondence by several months at the time and then arranging the correspondence in alphabetical order. The remaining correspondence boxes were then divided by professional or personal nature, and by language when possible, and arranged chronologically. In the correspondence with the notations “Parts I and II”, Professor Bay usually included lists of his correspondents. This system broke down in the last couple of years of his life.

Biographical and personal records

The series consists of biographical and personal records of Professor Bay. The material reflects his personal life, and includes press clippings, articles, and a thesis about him; personal documents such as educational records; documents of identification; personal papers related to life events (baptism, marriage, home ownership, inheritance, death certificates); calendars and a condolence scrapbook.

The arrangement of the material begins with biographical information (press clippings, biographies, curriculum vitae, referees, work about Bay), then personal papers, followed by what he termed “his personal collection”, consisting of items primarily in Norwegian relating to his family and Norway generally. The most intriguing portion of this “collection” is the folders of “illegal papers” [/002(28) – (30)] that Professor Bay buried when he hurriedly left Norway early in World War II and which he dug up sometime after he returned. There are also books about Norwegian resistance, and two books by his uncle.

Research Files (general)

Consists of general research files used by Dr. Paul A. Bator in the writing of his Within Reach of Everyone, a history of the School of Hygiene.

Sound recordings

These sound tapes were given to Professor Barbeau by Professor Warwick Sawyer at the time of his retirement in the 1970s. Includes two 1964 lectures by professor Edward F. Assmus, Jr. (1931–1998) on Algebraic Coding Theory as well as a talk by Harvard Mathematics Professor Garrett Birkhoff (1911-1996) on the history of computing math. All three lectures were possibly for the same event in February 1964 “lecture to AYI”.

Addresses

Most of this series is comprised of files on the radio broadcast, ‘Proof and truth in mathematics’, that Professor Barbeau presented on the CBC “Ideas” program on 11, 18, and 25 May, 1982. Included is covering correspondence, drafts of the scripts and transcripts of the tapes, and interviews with H.S.M. Coxeter, Chandler Davis, Stillman Drake, Charles V. Jones, Morris Kline, Frank Tall, Gregory Moore and Israel Weinzweig. The remainder of the series consists of a number of other addresses by Professor Barbeau and one by Serge Lang. The arrangement is chronological.

Manuscripts and publications

In the summer of 1983 Professor Barbeau was invited to write an article on mathematical problems for the alumni magazine, University of Toronto Graduate. Thirty-eight columns appeared between September 1984 and the summer of 1993. Associated with it
was the newsletter, After Aftermath, also compiled by Barbeau. Each column contained a cryptic crossword and posed a mathematical problem and, over the years, it drew responses from several hundred readers, including about two dozen “regulars”. The columns were assembled in book format and published as After Math: puzzles and brainteasers in 1995. This column, the resulting correspondence, and the newsletter form the bulk of this series.

Other publications in this series are, in chronological order, The Mathematical Oak, a newsletter of the Department of Mathematics edited by Professor Barbeau between 1986 and 1992; Polynomials (1989), a course book “designed to stand between the high school
and university curricula”2; Power Play (1997), the focus of which is power of numbers; a paper co-authored with P. C. Stangeby, “Some foundations of analysis for engineering science (MAT194F)” (2002); reviews of Pell’s Equations (2003); and a copy of a manuscript by Don Patterson, “University of Toronto – Honours Mathematics and Physics and Chemistry, 1927-1931; some memories as of December 1993.”

The files may contain correspondence, notes, drafts of manuscripts, page proofs, printed columns and newsletters.

Professional organizations

This small series encompasses three professional organizations with which Professor Barbour was involved. There is a slim folder of correspondence from when he was editor of the Canadian Mathematical Bulletin, and extensive files on the Gelfand Club of Ontario, a correspondence program founded in 1969 by Professor Israel Halperin of the University of Toronto “to provide resource material for able secondary school students interested in mathematics and to encourage them to correspond with mathematicians.” Professor Barbeau took over the program in January 1970 and ran it until October, 1978. The files contain notes, problem sets, and answers.

There are also three slim files on his involvement with the Mathematical Association of America, including its joint meeting in Toronto in 1976 and short courses Professor Barbeau offered for it in 1991 and 1993.

Administrative and teaching files

This series begins with a file containing Professor Barbeau’s curriculum vitae. It is followed by a single file on courses he taught at the University of Western Ontario (1964-1966). The remaining files document his activities in the Department of Mathematics at
the University of Toronto. There are a few general files, followed by a report of the Committee on the Structure of the Governance of the Department (1973), and files on selected staff, the Fields Institute and the Fields Medal. This section concludes with two
boxes of index cards listing students registered in the Mathematics and Physics program between 1903 and 1966, along with cards on interested Commerce and Finance students, physics students, and students who received the Samuel Beatty Fund Scholarship
between 1953 and 1959. One use made of these cards was to compile statistics on the number of students registered in the Mathematics and Physics (M&P) program.

The main part of the series contains material relating to courses Professor Barbeau taught at the University of Toronto, beginning in 1969. It ends with files on a number of publications and organizations at the University of Toronto. For most courses of the courses in this series, Professor Barbeau inserted a memo providing the background and context of each. The material for each course ranges from memoranda, notes and reports, reading lists, and supplementary notes to problem sets, analysis, tests and examinations. Included is the occasional term paper. Until the 1980s, Professor Barbeau developed detailed mimeographed material for his courses; he then switched to typewriters and eventually to computers. Some files, such as those for courses 129, 133Y, and 1030F, contain manuals, drafts of papers, and supplementary notes. Course 439 has drafts of chapters for a work by Barbeau on ‘functional analysis,’ the topic of his doctoral thesis.

Professor Barbeau taught both at the undergraduate and graduate level at the University of Toronto, and also did a lot of outreach work with high school students and working professionals. His taught his first course at the University of Toronto in 1960-1961,
while taking his Master’s degree: calculus to pre-medical students. Later he taught the history of mathematical analysis, a course on chaos and dynamical systems, and a research course of Pell’s equation (the last not represented in this series). He also
developed a general course in mathematics for students in other disciplines, particularly engineering students (see, for example, MEC 362F and MAT 2432/335) and a course in mathematics for intending elementary students. At the graduate level, besides courses in functional analysis and Fourier series, he helped develop a course on problem solving for a Master of Science in Teaching program.

Professor Barbeau’s interest in introducing high school students to mathematics is well documented in this series. Beginning in 1970 and for a quarter century thereafter, he ran a number of courses for high school students. The first, in the summer of 1970 and 1971, was the John Honour Special Seminar in mathematics, while the longest running program, from 1985-1995, was a correspondence course in polynomials, initially for high school students in Metropolitan Toronto. It was soon extended across Canada. In the 1980s he also ran a quantum mechanics seminar (1986), a recreational mathematics and combinatorics course (1987-1988), and he also encouraged high school students to compete in the American High School Mathematics Examination competition.

Another area of outreach was working professionals who needed to upgrade their knowledge. There are two examples in this series, a mathematics seminar for secondary school teachers (1964, 1965) and”Operation alert for engineers”. Each fall between 1972 and 1975, the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering offered an engineering update program in seven three-hour sessions, initially for about 40 working engineers from General Electric and later engineers from General Motors in Oshawa.

Professor Barbeau taught one of the sessions in each semester, on linear algebra and linear analysis.

This series ends with files on a number of publications and organizations at the University of Toronto. “Mathematical Mayhem” was a mathematical journal for gifted high school students and undergraduate students created by students at the University of
Toronto. In 1979, Professor Barbeau conceived of the idea of an essay contest in mathematics open to high school students, named in honour of Samuel Beatty, former Dean of Arts and head of the Department of Mathematics, which ran until 1982. The
quality of the submissions was sufficiently high that the trustees of the Samuel Beatty Fund published two volumes of the best essays.

Computer disks

This series contains 41 floppy disks containing files in various formats containing personal documents as well as official administrative documents of the Sioux Lookout Program. Some printouts from these files will be found in the above series.

Reports

This series contains two reports belonging to Dr. Baker relating to First Nations native health care: “First Nations child health care study. Final Report” produced by staff at McMaster University in 1992 and “Sioux Lookout First Nations Health Authority. Final Report I: Health Needs Assessment” by T. Kue Young (1995).

External professional activities

For most of his active career, Dr. Baker was involved with organizations related to his specialty in paediatrics and later native health. This series contains files documenting his involvement with the Canadian Paediatric Society including his chairmanship of the Indian and Inuit Health Committee. These files include minutes of meetings, drafts of papers, notes and correspondence. Also included are files on the Council of Faculties of Medicine of Ontario and the Northern Ontario Committee which he chaired from 1992 to 1997. There is also one file of the Canadian Psychiatric Association relating to a meeting in September 1989.

Academic activities

This series consists of files documenting some of Dr. Baker’s teaching and writing activities mainly produced during his years at the University of Toronto. There are two files containing drafts, notes and correspondence relating to Native Health lectures given to 2nd year medical students in January 1993. These are followed by four files containing drafts of papers on the history of the Sioux Lookout Program, northern native health and children’s health issues.

Subject files – Sioux Lookout Program

This series consists of files documenting some of the activities relating to this program. These include the Child Abuse Workshop, native health care including the NODIN Mental Health care services, orientation manual for visiting medical staff and visiting professorships. Files may include correspondence, reports, notes, presentation drafts, etc.

Correspondence and notes

This series contains files of correspondence and working notes regarding activities relating to the Sioux Lookout Program and external activities with such organizations such as the Council on Faculties of Medicine. Also included are Dr. Baker’s personal diaries notes for the period 1989 to 1992.

Personal /biographical

This series contains four files relating to personal and biographical information prepared by Dr. Baker. It includes curriculum vitae, brief biographical summary, correspondence relating to his appointment and salary at the University of Toronto, sabbatical leave in 1993, and personal correspondence.

Correspondence

This series contains correspondence from 1898-1950. Baillie was a professor of Marine Biology at the UofT. The correspondence in this series is mainly with family and friends while Baillie was stations in England during WWI, but also contains pre-war correspondence from Baillie to his parents, written while he was assigned to a marine biological station at St. Andrews, New Brunswick. There is also correspondence between Baillie and his son, while his son served overseas in WWII.

Filmmaking

This series contains the original film elements for several films made by Kay Armatage.
There are also files documenting this facet of her career including correspondence, film proposals, research notes, clippings, grant applications, budget reports, shot lists and scripts. Several files document her films Striptease, Storytelling and Artist on Fire, as well as Prof. Armatage’s attempt at writing and directing a film about Nell Shipman which did not go beyond development.

Photographs in this series include shots taken during the production of several of her films. There is one file documenting the filming of Storytelling which includes shots of Northrop Frye in New York City. There are also three contact sheets by Babette Mangolte taken during the making of Artist on Fire, with views of Joyce Weiland’s Toronto studio and home. The series also contains one file of printing plates used in the creation of publicity material for Prof. Armatage’s early film Jill Johnson, October 1975.

Professional activities

This series documents various professional activities and research including participation in conferences, film festivals and screenings, and particularly Prof. Armatage’s work within the Major Collaborative Research Initiatives Program. The series includes her correspondence with a small number of notable women filmmakers, including Dorothy Arzner and Tracey Moffatt, as well as posters, programs, and pamphlets on women and cinema collected over the course of her professional career. There is also one file relating to her time teaching in Japan in 2002.

Publishing and talks

This series documents a small selection of academic papers and talks published or given by Prof. Armatage throughout her career. Files can contain edited typescripts, correspondence, e-mail and readers’ reports. There are two files of her published reviews and a file with copies of some of her magazine contributions. Additionally, there are records relating to her book The Girl From God’s Country: Nell Shipman and the Silent Cinema (University of Toronto Press, 2003). These include research notes, correspondence and a copy of the manuscript.

Notebooks

Notebooks contain mainly analysis of films reviewed by Prof. Armatage in her capacity as a programmer and curator of the Toronto International Film Festival. There are also some notes relating to meetings and appointments. The notebook in B2012-0002 is largely related to her administrative activities at Innis College between 2010 and 2011.

Assessments and letters of recommendation

These files contain comments by Prof. Armatage on students’ essays and assignments. These are fairly extensive and document her approach to teaching her subject matter. Files are arranged by course number. Also included are three files of letters of recommendation for students and colleagues filed chronologically.

Teaching

This series consists of course files that can contain lectures, course outlines, assignments, and reading lists. It documents Prof. Armatage’s approach to the teaching of both Women’s Studies and Cinema Studies in the early years as they were emerging into disciplines of study and research.

Files in B2005-0020 focus on teaching in the 1970s. For these early courses, except for INI 112Y Introduction to Cinema Studies and NEW 260Y Introduction to Women’s Studies, all courses were developed and taught solely by Prof. Armatage.

Files in B2009-0020 relate exclusively to courses she taught in Cinema Studies from 1990-2007. This accession also contains subject files used for course lectures, covering various topics in film studies. These files contain lecture notes and outlines to lectures and are arranged alphabetically by topic.

Files in B2012-0002 focus on two courses she taught in Cinema Studies from 2006-2010, INI 323 Feminist Approaches to Cinema and INI 484 International Film Festivals. This accession also contains several subject files used for course lectures, covering various topics in film studies. These files contain lecture notes as well as teaching resources published by the British Film Institute, and are arranged alphabetically by topic.

Courses in Cinema Studies at Innis College:

B2005-0012/001 (08)-(17) /002 (01)-(22)

  • INI 112 Introduction to Film Studies
  • INI 212/NEW 212 Introduction to Cinema Studies
  • INI 225 Documentary Film
  • INI 280 and 281 Women’s Cinema
  • INI 321 Film Study
  • INI 322 Experimental and Avant-Garde Film
  • INI 323 Women and Representation
  • INI 325 Dream, History and Narrative in the Cinema
  • INI 327 Race and Representation
  • INI 428 Dream, History and Narrative in the Cinema
  • INI 429 Post Colonial Film and Third Cinema

B2009-0020/002 (01)-(13)

  • INI 214 Film Theory
  • INI 323 Women and Representation
  • INI 325 Documentary Film
  • INI 327 Race and Representation
  • INI 330 Contemporary Film Theory
  • INI 385 Canadian Film
  • INI 423 Melodrama
  • INI 424 Current issues in Film Theory
  • INI 425 Apparatus and After: Film Theory since 1970
  • INI 429 Dream, History and Narrative in the Cinema
  • INI 481 Advanced Studies in Cinema

B2012-0002/001 (03)-(05)

  • INI 323 Feminist Approaches to Cinema
  • INI 484 International Film Festivals

Courses in Women Studies at New College

B2005-0012/002 (23)-(30)

  • NEW 220 Women Writers
  • NEW 260 Introduction to Women’s Studies
  • NEW 360 Introduction to Women’s Literature
  • NEW 363 Selected Topics in Feminist Theory

Subject Files – Cinema Studies
B2009-0020/002 (15)-(24) and /003
B2012-0002/001 (06)-(16)

See also electronic files:
B2012-0002/Disks 001, 003, 006, 010 – 011, 017, 019 – 020

Academic activity files

This series contains documents pulled together by Prof. Armatage for her tenure review as well as for subsequent yearly reviews. Files contain mainly professional correspondence, descriptive reports on research and teaching activities, yearly activity reports and clippings about her work. There is information on promotions, awards, research leaves and grants. Clippings in this series also give evidence to Prof. Armatage’s work outside mainstream academia including her role as a documentary filmmaker and curator for the Toronto International Film Festival.

Teaching

The records consist of files relating to graduate courses only: GGR 441ES Images of Cities, GGR 1549 Readings in theoretical geography, and JGS 340Y (1987-88) Concepts, methods and values in urban studies. Records include lecture notes, class assignments, examinations and reading lists.

Results 2151 to 2200 of 2244