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2006.011 accrual

This fonds includes six series, divided by format. These are: Textual Material, Photographic Material, Audio Material, Video Material, Cinefilm/Cinex, and Artifacts.

The first series, Textual Material, is chiefly made up of scripts, storyboards, production files, research files, correspondence, meeting notes, equipment files, technical drawings, bylaws, cast/crew lists, contracts and proposals.

The second series, Photographic Material, represents all periods of Spiess’ career, from his early portraiture and fine art images to his industrial/commercial work to production stills documenting his cinematographic work. This series is divided into two subseries: PH.1239 & PH.610977 and PH.240609.

The third series, Audio Material, includes soundtrack production elements and music.

The fourth series, Video Material, includes high quality dubs of the various versions of the finished commercial productions, as well as production elements for those commercials shot on video.

The fifth series, Cinefilms/Cinex, includes finished release prints of the various commercials as well as a number of short films by Spiess.

The sixth series, Artifacts, consists of examples of the tools that Spiess used to teach his students, as well as mementos of his involvement with the CSC.

This fonds includes 1,635 examples of Spiess’ commercials with most of the major local
and national clients represented. Clients/Products advertised include:

7Up
AT&T
Avon
Bank of Montreal
The Bay
Black Magic Chocolates
Black and Decker Tools
Buick
Canada Post
Canada Savings Bonds
Canadian Tire
Carling Brewery
Coca-Cola
Continental Bank
Dairy Queen
Dial Soap
Canada Homes
Chrysler
CIBC
CNCP
Dare Cookies
Eastern Sound
Eaton Centre
Ford Motor Co.
General Motors Canada/GMC
Great West Life
Gulf Oil
GWG Jeans
Hitachi
HIV/AIDS prevention PSA
Imperial Oil/Esso
International Nickel
Jello
Kelloggs
Kotex
Lipton Teas
Maclean’s
Mattel Toys
McDonalds Restaurants
Micron Skates
Miracle Food Mart
Molson Breweries
Monarch Cakes
Oldsmobile
Ontario Hydro
Ontario Lottery
Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources
Oscar Myer Wieners
Panasonic
Pontiac
Rustoleum
Sears
Sherwin Williams paint
Timex
Uniroyal
Xerox
As well there are AV materials relating to his full length film

Die Thomaner (1941)
Don’t Hurry Past: Cerebral Palsy

Spiess, Fritz

2008.014 accrual

Accession 2008.014 is divided into 6 series according to format.
These are: Textual and Other Material, Photographic Material, Graphic Material, Audio Material, Video Material, and Artifacts.
The first series, Textual and Other Material, includes scripts related to Nelvana (scripts, business, legal records, development files,correspondence, personal diaries, notebooks and other production-related files). This series also includes 31 series bibles and over 500 books and periodicals.
The second series, Photographic Material, includes photographs related to the animation production process, as well as images of Nelvana staff at work and play.
The third series, Graphic Material, includes material from different parts of the production process (animation cells, backgrounds, and cleanups).
They include some of the best known and most valuable of such materials, including Tintin, Rupert, Babar and Dog City. This series also includes posters.
The fourth series, Audio Material, consists largely of commercial recordings used for research. This series also includes rough mixes for Nelvana productions.
The fifth series, Video Material, primarily consists of completed Nelvana programs, as well as different versions of productions in progress.
The sixth series, Artifacts, includes a number of promotional items (toys, stuffed animals, clothing, etc.) from Hirsh’s productions.

This fonds includes graphic and textual material relating to a number of productions, including:

The Edison Twins (Television, 1982)
Droids (Television, 1985)
The Care Bears (Television, 1985)
Babar (Television, 1989)
Rupert (Television, 1991)
The Adventures of Tintin (Television, 1991)
Eek! the Cat (Television, 1992)
Cadillacs and Dinosaurs (Television, 1993)
Dog City (Television, 1992)
Tales from the Cryptkeeper (Television, 1993)
Budgie the Little Helicopter (Television, 1994)
Tabaluga (Television, 1994)
Tales from the Crypt (Television, 1996)
Franklin (Television, 1997)
Bob and Margaret (Television, 1998)
The Doodlebops (Television, 2004)
This fonds includes audiovisual material relating to a number of productions, including:

A Cosmic Christmas (Television, 1977)
The Care Bears (Television, 1985)
Tres Estelles (Television, 1987)
My Pet Monster (Television, 1987)
T & T (Television, 1988)
Babar (Television, 1989)
Beetlejuice (Television, 1989)
Little Rosey (Television, 1990)
Ren & Stimpy Show (Television, 1991)
The Adventures of Tintin (Television, 1991)
Rupert (Television, 1991)
Eek! the Cat (Television, 1992)
Fievel’s American Tails (Television, 1992)
Family Dog (Television, 1993)
Cadillacs and Dinosaurs (Television, 1993)
Dog City (Television, 1992)
Free Willy (Television, 1994)
The Magic School Bus (Television, 1994)
Tales from the Cryptkeeper (Television, 1994)
Little Lulu (Television, 1995)
Little Bear (Television, 1995)
The Hardy Boys (Television, 1995)
The Neverending Story (Television, 1995)
Blazing Dragons (Television, 1996)
Stickin’ Around (Television, 1996)
Nancy Drew (Television, 1995)
Waynehead (Television, 1996)
Ace Ventura: Pet Detective (Television, 1996)
Donkey Kong Country (Television, 1997)
Ned’s Newt (Television, 1997)
Gargoyles: The Goliath Chronicle (Television, 1997)
Franklin (Television, 1997)
Anatole (Television, 1998)
Flying Rhino Junior High (Television, 1998)
Dumb Bunnies (Television, 1998)
Bob and Margaret (Television, 1998)
Birdz (Television, 1998)
Pippi Longstocking (Television, 1997)
Rolie Polie Olie (Television, 1998)
Blaster’s Universe (Television, 1999)
George and Martha (Television, 1999)
Redwall (Television, 2001)
The Doodlebops (Television, 2004)
Spider Riders (Television, 2006)

Hirsh, Michael

2008.015 accrual

Accession 2008.015 consists of five series (determined by format), ranging between 1928 and 2005.
These are: Scrapbooks; Appointment Books; Textual Documents; Photographs; and VHS Videotapes.

The first series, Scrapbooks, consists of four oversized, handcrafted scrapbooks likely assembled by Susan Douglas. These scrapbooks document Rubeš’ European opera career, Rubeš’ North American career, Douglas’ career, and their family life.

The second series, Appointment Books, covers the period between 1955 and 2005. These include personal appointment diaries and day timers, as well as a ledger.

The third series, Textual Documents, was largely assembled by the Rubeš’ son, Tony. These files cover the period between 1928 and 2005 and include press clippings, reviews, personal correspondence, mementos, resumes, and biographies.

The fourth series, Photographs, consists of numerous publicity shots, production stills and photographs from 1940 – 2002. The subjects include fellow cast members, colleagues, and family members.

The fifth series, VHS Videotapes, includes several of Rubeš’ performances from the 1950s to 2005. These guest roles in movies and selected television productions characterize the sort of roles that Rubeš played later in his career.

Accession 2008.015 contains textual material in relating to several productions,
including:

Figaro (Live musical performance, 1948)
Forbidden Journey (Film, 1950)
Guiding Light (Television, 1953?)
Witness (Film, 1985)
Kane and Abel (Television, 1985)
Dead of Winter (Film, 1987)
Two Men (Television, 1988)
Something about Love (Film, 1988)
The Outside Chance of Maximilian Glick (Film, 1989)
Max Glick (Television, 1990)
Coming of Age (Television, 1993)
Stargate SG 1 (Television, 2001)
The Outer Limits (Television, 1999)
Snow Falling on Cedars (Film, 1999)
Flight of the Reindeer (Television, 2000)
Anthrax (Film, 2001)
The Republic of Love (Film, 2003)
Accession 2008.015 contains audiovisual material relating to several productions,
including:

Forbidden Journey (Film, 1950)
Lions for Breakfast (Film, 1975)
Deadly Harvest (Film, 1977)
Vandenberg (Television, 1983)
Charlie Grant’s War (Television, 1984)
The Marriage Bed (Film, 1986)
Kay O’Brien (Television, 1986)
Fame (Television, 1987)
The Outside Chance of Maximilian Glick (Film, 1988)
Blood Relations (Film, 1988)
No Blame (Television, 1988)
Blind Fear (Film, 1989)
E.N.G. (Television, 19891992)
Street Legal (Television, 1990)
Max Glick (Television, 1990)
Class Action (Film, 1991)
Devlin (Television, 1992)
Coming of Age (Television, 1993)
Lambchop and the Haunted Studio (Television, 1994)
The Birds II (Film, 1994)
Roommates (Film, 1995)
Serving in Silence: The Margarethe Cammermeyer Story (Television, 1995)
X-Files (Television, 1996)
Never Too Late (Film, 1997)
The Outer Limits (Television, 1999)
The City (Television, 1999)
Flight of the Reindeer (Television, 2000)
Stargate SG1 (Television, 2001)
Anthrax (Film, 2001)
Mentors (Television, 2001)
Tilt (Television, 2005)
Our Fathers (Television, 2005)
Appassionata: The Extraordinary Life and Music of Sonia Eckhardt-Gramatte (Film, 2006)

Rubes, Jan

2014.003 accrual

This fonds is divided into 5 series, divided by format. These are: Cinefilm, Video Materials, Audio Materials, Photographic Materials, Textual Records.

The first series, Cinefilm, contains original prints in both b&w and colour. It includes home movies, newsreels, as well as Spiess’s debut film Die Thomaner.

The second series, Video Materials, contains Digital Betacam cassettes. These include transfers of commercials, home movies, and Die Thomaner.

The third series, Audio Materials, includes soundtrack elements and radio commercials.

The fourth series, Photographic Materials includes behind the scenes photos of commercial shoots, family portraits, and glass negatives by Spiess’s father, Karl.

The fifth series, Textual Materials, includes papers relating to the formation of the first accrual of the Fritz Spiess archive. It also includes several periodicals that featured work by Spiess and technical literature about technologies of the day.

This fonds includes textual, photographic, graphic material relating to a number of productions/entities/products, including:

• The Canadian Society of Cinemathographers 1957- 2007 (2007)
• Upside Down: Les Artiques (2008)
• Upside Down: Les Artiques (2011)
• Eskimo Art Film
• Fritz Spiess fonds
• “Jamaican Pumpkin”
• Karl Spiess
• Pledge

This fonds includes audio-visual material relating to a number of productions/entities/commercial products, including:

• Spiess Family German home movies (1930 – 1941)
• Die Thomaner (1941)
• Spiess Family Canadian home movies (1950s)
• Canada 100 Centennial Film
• Carling Black Label
• Eskimo Art Film
• Gulf
• Inco
• Playboy

Spiess, Fritz

A critical analysis

This item consists of a 4 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled ‘A Critical Analysis’ published in Ave Maria National Catholic Weekly, 3 June 1967, p. 11-13, 30. Nouwen discusses the rise and popularity of the Pentecostal movement at Notre Dame University in Indiana and states that the article ‘is an attempt to clarify certain issues and to be of some help in an honest evaluation’. Nouwen looks at the phenomenon from three perspectives: 1) A Historical Perspective: He writes of the past and current religious atmosphere at Notre Dame. Here he credits an article by Killian McDonnell. O.S.B. (The Ecumenical Significance of the Pentecostal Movement) where there is a discussion of the ‘sobriety’ and ‘objectivity’ of Roman Catholic liturgy in contrast to the more emotional freedom and sense of belonging in the Pentecostal services. Nouwen suggests that this latter may answer a need in the new more ambitious and competitive atmosphere at the university. 2) A Psychological Perspective. Here Nouwen asks how we can evaluate this new movement by asking several questions: Does it heal or hurt? He suggests that evidence leads to a conclusion that while there may be a short term benefit ‘it is very doubtful that it will cure deep mental suffering’. He also asks ‘Can it be dangerous’? He states that ‘for those who are not prepared every inducement of a strong emotion can break and do serious harm. He also suggests that for those who do not receive the ‘gifts’ such as tongues or joy there then may be the question ‘what is wrong with me’. This leads to the need for direction, guidance and care. Finally he asks: Does it create community? Nouwen suggests that the powerful emotions of belonging and sharing, may risk creating a community that is inward and elitist. ‘the Pentecostal movement creates a situation of oneness and togetherness, which makes the community highly self-centered and hinders the development of the autonomous Christian…’. 3) A Theological Perspective: here Nouwen is asking if the Pentecostal movement is reflecting the theological developments of Vatican II and suggests that it may not meet the new stress on incarnational theology. He concludes the article by stating: ‘the new wave of Pentecostalism at Notre Dame University obviously answers a burning need in many students. It worries many who are concerned about the effects on the mental health of some…It places heavy responsibility on the leaders of the movement, and it disturbs many theologians’ but it also offers a chance to come to a new realization of the crucial importance of the valid religious experience – as an authentic part of the Christian life’.

A cry for mercy: prayers from the Genesee

Item consists of a book of prayers which Nouwen wrote during his six-month stay, February to August 1979, with the Trappist Monks of the Abbey of the Genesee in upstate New York. The book has been divided into the following: Prologue; I February-March: A fearful heart; II March-April: A cry for mercy; III April-May: Rays of hope; IV May-June: The power of the Spirit; V June-July: The needs of the world; VI July-August: A grateful heart; Epilogue.
As is stated on the back cover: "These contemporary prayers speak powerfully of one man's search for a closer relationship with his God and of his struggle to confront his own inner turmoil."

A different accent

Item consists of a book which features Nouwen in a chapter "Peace", subtitled "Living peace" dated April 28, 1983 and beginning on p. 35.

A dry roof and a cow: dreams and portraits of our neighbours

Item consists of a pamphlet in which Nouwen has written the introduction, stating: "The people portrayed in the book 'are in touch with something larger than a wish for a gift from a stranger who might come along and show pity on them. They are in touch with a dream that makes them visionaries of a new future.'"

A dry roof and a cow: dreams and portraits of our neighbours

Item consists of a book in which Nouwen has written the introduction, stating in part: "I trust that, as we let the words and images in this book penetrate our hearts, we will experience a deep desire to do whatever possible to make the dream of a worldwide community of love and peace become a reality."

A glimpse behind the mirror: reflections on death and life

This item is an 11 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled, ‘A Glimpse behind the Mirror: Reflections on Death and Life’ published in Weavings, A Journal of the Christian Spiritual Life, Vol. IV, No. 6, November/December 1989, PP. 13 – 23. This article is about Nouwen’s experience with possible death after a road accident. Nouwen begins the article by describing the accident, his experience of the hospital emergency room and intensive care ward. Nouwen describes his gradual awareness that he might die; that he was at peace. ‘I kept thinking that dying was quite possible and that I had to prepare myself and my friends for it. And so I let myself enter a place I had never been before: the portal of death.’ Nouwen describes his experience of the presence of the love of Jesus and his deep sense of wanting to make the journey of dying to life. Nouwen is hesitant however because he knows there are relationships unhealed and forgiveness not yet given nor received. Nouwen slowly realizes that he will not die and believes that he has work to do. ‘I believe that I am asked to proclaim the love God in a new way.’ Pondering the way Jesus was in the world Nouwen asks, ‘Can I become like Jesus and witness to what I have seen? Yes, I can live in God and speak to the human reality’. Nouwen concludes the article with a quote from Phil. 1:21 -26, words of Paul that Nouwen hopes will be his guide.

A glimpse of the "gay world" in San Francisco & the "fast world" in Los Angeles: struggling to remain anchored in Jesus

This item is a 5 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled, ‘Struggling to remain anchored in Jesus, published in the New Oxford Review, July-August 1987, pp. 5 – 9. This item is part 10 and the final installment of a series of articles written during the year that Nouwen was resident at L’Arche, Trosly-Breuil , France. The items date from May 31, 1986 to July 6, 1986. The first entry describes a visit Henri and a friend make to the Castro district of San Francisco, a gay area. He writes of seeing the fearful, lonely faces of men struggling with the awareness of AIDS. Nouwen concludes the entry stating that his friend commented, ‘I am glad you came. There are too few people who mention his Name in the district. There are so many negative associations with his Name and still he is the greatest source of hope.’ The next entry describes his visit to Los Angeles and the atmosphere of what he describes as ‘the enormous superficiality of our culture’. Nouwen then flies to Madison, Wisconsin for a visit with Parker and Sally Palmer to discuss theological education and a possible one-week summer institute for seminary professors. Palmer and Nouwen discuss the need for theological students to have spiritual help, not to separate theology and spirituality. Nouwen notes that: ‘the study of theology must have the quality of prayer; theological study must also foster the creation of communities of faith… and finally, the study of theology must always lead to witness’. The final three entries are written when Nouwen returns to France and finds himself assessing his year there. He writes of wanting to share with Nathan but having to wait to do that, he notes that he feels scattered and finds it hard to pray for an hour in the morning, he is not sleeping well and feels ‘somewhat indifferent’ but not depressed. Nouwen realizes that he has not really got to know the handicapped people as well as he hoped. In the last entry Nouwen notes that he is leaving Trosly, will visit his family, go to Boston and then on to Daybreak for a three year commitment. He notes three graces from his time at L’Arche: being in Europe again, renewing and making friendships, and beginning to make a deeper contact with the handicapped.

A letter of consolation

Item consists of a book which Nouwen wrote as a letter of consolation to his father six months after the death of Henri's mother.

A life through Adam

This item is an article by Henri Nouwen entitled, ‘A Life Through Adam’ published in British edition of The Reader’s Digest, September 1990, pp. 75 -77. This item is a slightly revised version of the article published in the January 1990 U.S. edition of The Reader’s Digest (see item 1753). This item is condensed from an article published in Weavings, March/April 1988. Nouwen begins by stating that he has recently moved from academia to living at the l’Arche community of Daybreak with men and women who have mental disabilities. He describes being assigned to help a very severely handicapped man named Adam. Nouwen describes his daily routine with the totally helpless 25 year old man and his growing awareness that Adam was doing more for him than he for Adam. ‘This severely handicapped young man, whom outsiders sometimes describe with very hurtful words, started to become my dearest companion’. Nouwen goes on to describe the very special effect Adam has on the people with whom he lives and the peace that, because of Adam’s need, helps them to work together.

A new life among the handicapped: farewell to Harvard

This item is a 9 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled, ‘A New Life Among the Handicapped’ published in the New Oxford Review, Vol. LIII, No.7, September 1986, pp.5 – 13. The article is identified as the first installment of a series of articles taken from a Nouwen diary written during his time as priest-in-residence at L’Arche, Trosley-Breuil, France. The excerpts from Nouwen’s diary in this article begin August 13, 1985 and end September 24. In the first entry Nouwen describes this as ‘the first day of my new life! Nouwen writes of meeting Madame Vanier, of his leaving Harvard, his new quarters and his sense of how different this life is from his very busy life in academia. The entries that follow include reflections on how Jean Vanier began L’Arche with Pere Thomas Phillipe, Nouwen’s longing to be able to live a simpler life, his gratitude for the prayerful support of his friends, his hurt and anger when a friend fails to visit him. Nouwen speaks of his daily time spent in the Oratory at Trosly: ‘In many ways the Oratoire is the heart of l’Arche…every time I enter the Oratoire I feel a deep rest coming over me…’ Nouwen also speaks of one of the foyers he visits which is called La Forestiere where the most severely handicapped live. Further entries speak of the people he meets and include his reflections on their lives.

A place where God wants to dwell

This item is a one page article by Henri Nouwen entitled ‘A Place Where God wants to dwell’, published in Compass: A Jesuit Journal, Vol. 7, No. 4, September 1989, p. 34. Henri begins the article by describing his reading as a teacher of Christian spirituality and his discovery that you must be poor ‘so God can finally be with you’. Nouwen then goes on to describe his experience at l’Arche Daybreak in Richmond Hill Ontario and in particular his friendship with Adam Arnett. Nouwen describes Adam as a profoundly handicapped man who knows nothing of the world Nouwen has lived in and yet becomes for Nouwen, a teacher. Nouwen writes, “Daybreak turns our expectations upside down…Because of Adam’s weakness – his poverty – we can be united in ways that form the body. Because of Adam’s needs, we come to grips with our own’. Nouwen goes on to describe a l’Arche community as not a romantic place but one of struggle and a school of discipleship.

A prayerful life

This item is a short quote from Henri Nouwen’s book The Way of the Heart and is entitled, ‘A Prayerful life’ published in Christopher News Notes, N.Y. , No. 279. No year is identified but the file suggests ‘after 1981’. The quote outlines the need in prayer to ‘include all people’.

A psychologist on priests' identity crises

Item consists of a one page article by Henri Nouwen entitled: "A psychologist on priests' identity crises" published in The National Catholic Reporter, 17 May 1967, p. 6. The article is about three perceived threats to the mental health of priests. These are described in terms of problems with time, with space and with self-understanding. 1) The new priest starts by giving his whole time to his ministry with little or no demarcation between work and rest. He thrives on being at the center, being available to everyone all the time. In time , because there is little change in fact, this can and does frequently lead to being ‘ an irritated, empty, routine, tired man’. In addition, at a daily level there is no demarcation of time between ‘work’ and ‘home’. No time to stop and reflect or even pray. 2) ‘Besides a healthy use of time, a healthy use of place is of great importance for the mental health of the priest’. Because he is always at work there is no space to find rest; because the people he lives with are the people he works with, there is no personal space. The demarcation lines of authority are vague and unhealthy. ‘…healthy spacing not only refers to healthy defining of places and rooms, but also connected with that, to healthy clarification of responsibilities and authority which belong to the different roofs under which we live’. 3) With a lack of privacy and no demarcation of personal, private relationships the priest often lacks a firm self-identity. ‘Without a spiritual life and a good friend he is like a sounding brass or a tinkling cymbal’. In addition, there is a lack of clarity of his role as a professional, he receives little praise from anyone including superiors so he does not know how well he is doing. The author stresses the importance of the priest’s everyday confrontation with living theology in the people he serves and that is not used or appreciated.

A response from Henri J.M. Nouwen

This item is a 1 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled ‘A Response from Henri J.M. Nouwen” published in The Christian Ministry, Vol. 18, No. 1, January 1987, p. 20. This item is a response to an article published in this same volume entitled: ‘The Minister as Narrator’ by John Robert McFarland in which the ‘model’ of the minister presented by Nouwen in ‘The Wounded Healer’ and that of James D. Glasse in ‘Profession: Minister: Confronting the Identity Crisis of the Parish Clergy’ is critically evaluated and found wanting. Nouwen responds by noting that his concept of wounded healer was simply ‘an attempt to say something – not everything – about ministry’. Nouwen suggests that McFarland’s ideas have merit and much to offer, ‘if he does not try to offer too much’.

A self-emptied heart: the disciplines of spiritual formation

This item is a three page article by Henri Nouwen entitled, ‘A Self-Emptied Heart: The Disciplines of spiritual formation’, published in Sojourners, Vol. 10, No. 8, August , 1981, pp. 20 – 22. This is part three of a three part series. Nouwen begins this article by stating that discipleship requires discipline. He identifies three disciplines in particular: 1) the discipline of the church – ‘by which we remain in touch with the true story of God in history. Nouwen identifies the importance of the church community ,’ The attention to the presence of Christ in our own personal story can only remain free from self-deception when we remain attentive to the presence of Christ in the daily life of the church’. 2) The discipline of the book – here Nouwen emphasizes the necessity of reading the scriptures deeply and meditatively. 3) The discipline of the heart – ‘The discipline of the heart is the discipline of personal prayer which…leads us not just to our own heart, but to the heart of God’. Nouwen concludes this series of three articles, ‘We are called to follow Christ on his downwardly mobile road, tempted to choose the broad path of success, notoriety, and influence, and challenged to subject ourselves to spiritual disciplines in order to gradually conform to the image of our Lord Jesus Christ’.

A seven day journey with Thomas Merton

Item consists of a book in which Nouwen has written the foreword, reflecting on his own visit with Merton and a friend, Joe Ahearn, in 1966. Nouwen concludes in part: "When I read Esther de Waal's [book] I said to myself: 'What better guide can there be than this earthy, yet so spiritual man, whom I met with my friend Joe at the pond in Gethsemani.'"

A spirituality of waiting: being alert to God's presence in our lives

This item is a 12 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled: ‘A Spirituality of Waiting: Being Alert to God’s presence in our Lives’, published in Weavings, January/February 1987, pp. 6 – 17. Nouwen begins by suggesting two aspects of waiting: waiting for God and the waiting of God. Nouwen identifies these two aspects of waiting found first in the beginning of Luke’s Gospel and then, at the end of Luke’s Gospel. In the first section Nouwen points out how hard it is for most of us to wait; that waiting is considered as wasting time. He then points to the people in Luke’s Gospel who are waiting: Zechariah and Elizabeth, Mary, Simeon and Anna. Nouwen then discusses 1) the nature of waiting as waiting with a sense of promise and 2) waiting as active. In the scripture the figures he writes of are waiting for the fulfilment of a promise and they are waiting very actively. ‘The secret of waiting is the faith that the seed has been planted, that something has begun. Active waiting means to be present fully to the moment, in the conviction that something is happening where you are and that you want to be present of it’. Nouwen also describes a waiting person as a patient person. In a section on the practice of waiting Nouwen describes the need we have of community and mutual support along with an alertness to the word. Nouwen then looks at the waiting found in the last part of Luke’s Gospel , in the passion of Jesus. Nouwen states that this material is outlined in a book by W.H. Vanstone called ‘The Stature of Waiting’. Nouwen begins by describing the concerns of a friend who was dying of cancer and didn’t see how to live the passivity of his life. The remainder of the article enlarges on the idea by Vanstone that Jesus moved from action to passion, losing control of his life and waiting and allowing it to happen. Jesus and God are waiting to see how people will respond, how we will respond and they do not have control over that. Nouwen concludes by stating, ‘If it is true that God in Jesus Christ is waiting for our response to divine love then we can discover a whole new perspective on how to wait in life’.

A sudden trip to Lourdes: by-passing the excitement of Berlin

This item is a 6 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled, ‘A Sudden Trip to Lourdes, published in New Oxford Review, Vol. LVII, No.7, September, 1990, pp. 7 - 13. Nouwen begins by stating that he is writing this in Lourdes during an unexpected divergence from his planned visit to Berlin. ‘The question for me was: How to live [the next decade]? The answer came quietly: In deep communion with Jesus’. Nouwen reflects on the water – of Baptism, of healing at the baths, on the rain. Nouwen goes to confession where the priests says to him, ‘Don’t be afraid to be poor, alone, naked, stripped of all your familiar ways of doing things. God is not finished with you yet’. Nouwen reflects on the innocence of Mary, of Bernadette and of his own. He reflects on Jesus’ passion in the Stations of the Cross and on the resurrection. After three days in Lourdes, Nouwen feels it is time to leave and he returns to the L’Arche community at Trosly. Nouwen, reflects as he is in the train returning to Paris, ‘I know that every time I choose for my innocence I don’t have to worry about the next 10 years. I can be sure I am not alone, but with him who called me to live as God’s child’.

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