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Activities files

These "activity files" (so named by Dr. Solandt) range from the clubs to which he belonged, to professional associations, and to organizations that had scientific and/or social implications in which he was particularly interested, such as the Canadian Nuclear Association. Their scope moves from local to international and several levels in between.

The files contain a corresponding variety of material, ranging from correspondence, manu-scripts, and notes, to memoranda, programs, pamphlets, reports. Their arrangement is alphabetical by name of event, individual or organization. Included are files on the Conference of Experts to Study the Methods of Detecting Violations of a Possible Agreement on the Suspension of Nuclear Weapons Tests (1958), for which Dr. Solandt was a member of the Western delegation.

Associations and committees

An active joiner and participant, Dr. Solandt belonged to many associations and sat on many committees. Those documented here are those he was most interested in and his involvement often lasted many years. The title for this series is Dr. Solandt

Travel files

Omond Solandt traveled frequently and widely in pursuit of his professional and personal interests. On a single trip he might act in several capacities. The principal trips are several visits to northern Canada, to Russia (1964 and 1971), and to New Zealand and Antarctica (1966).

This series contains itineraries, correspondence, notes, programs, addresses, diaries, pamphlets, press coverage, publications, photoprints and maps. The files are usually arranged by destination and year rather than the organization(s) on behalf of which he was undertaking a trip.

Defence Research Board

In 1946 Dr. Solandt was called back to Ottawa where he was appointed as Director-General of Defence Research. The following year he was invited to become the founding chair of the Defence Research Board of Canada which was responsible for co-ordinating and directing defence science and research and development for the three armed services.

While most of the records generated by the Defence Research Board are in Ottawa, the correspondence, addresses, press clippings, articles, pamphlets, reports and photoprints (see Series 44) in this series provide a succinct overview of Solandt

Canoe trips

Dr. Solandt was introduced to canoes at an early age but did not take up the sport seriously until he was 41. The group that assembled for the first canoe trip into Quetico Park in 1952 formed the core of what subsequently became the

Education

Omond Solandt attended Mulvey School in Winnipeg from 1915 to November 1920, when his family moved to Toronto. He then attended Rosedale Junior Public School, transferring to Central Technical School in 1922. For his last year of high school he attended Jarvis Collegiate.

He enrolled at the University of Toronto in 1927, as an undergraduate at Victoria College. He graduated with a BA in 1931 with first class honours in biological and medical sciences. Omond

Atomic bomb

In September, 1945 the British Chiefs of Staff were invited by their American counterparts to send a mission to Japan to study the effects of the atomic bomb. Omond Solandt was loaned to the Scientific Advisor to the Army Council in the War Office to go as his representative. He went as a specialist in damage to military installations but, there being none of significance in Hiroshima or Nagasaki, spent most of his time studying the casualties from a medical perspective.

This series includes Dr. Solandt

Diplomas and certificates

This series contains diplomas and certificates, including all honorary degrees and all earned degrees. For some there are related correspondence, programs, invitations, and photoprints.

Files of correspondence, citations, programs and photoprints associated with the diplomas and certificates are interspersed with them. Some diplomas and certificates are not present, but any surviving material associated with them is filed.

Correspondence

Except for one file of correspondence from 1989, covering correspondents filed by surname, I through P and filed in accession B1993-0041, all the correspondence in this series is from accession B1994-0020.

This series has large gaps, particularly for the fifteen years following the Second World War and the 1970s. It begins with Dr. Solandt's wartime letters to his family during the Second World War, where letters from March 1943 to October 1944 are absent, followed by a few letters from 1947, 1954, and 1956. The remainder of the correspondence was arranged by Dr. Solandt in several systems. The first covers the years 1963-1986, the arrangement being alphabetical. A few of the files deal with particular organizations: the Commission on Canadian Studies (1974-1976), the National Radiological Protection Board in the United Kingdom (1976-1981), the Vanier Medal Selection Committee (1975) and York University (1976).

The second system, described as "miscellaneous" correspondence, is filed chronologically between 1955 and 1965. The file for 1955-1962 contains relatively few letters and the file for 1965 is his "personal" correspondence file while employed at Hawkker-Siddeley. These are followed by five files for 1970 (arranged alphabetically, A-S), and one for each year from 1980 to 1992 inclusive. There is a 1989 file on unidentified flying objects (UFOs), about which there are in earlier files some letters from the same correspondents.

University of Cambridge and World War II

Following graduation in medicine from the University of Toronto, Dr. Solandt decided to embark on a career of clinical research in cardiology, using the Ellen Mickle Scholarship. He spent three academic terms in 1936-1937 at the University of Cambridge under the tutilege of Dr. Alan N. Drury, a distinguished researcher in the field of experimental pathology and one of Britain

Biographical and personal files

This series is divided into two sections. The first contains biographical sketches and curriculum vitae, press clippings and articles about Dr. Solandt, along with photocopies of his birth certificate and copies of his will and that of his first wife, Elizabeth. There is correspondence with Elizabeth regarding their marriage, with relatives and friends, and relating to appointments. Also present is a cash book detailing personal expenses between 1923 and 1946, a diary of Dr. Solandt’s first trip to Europe in 1929.

The first portion of this series concludes with the programme for the Solandt Symposium on Organizing and Managing the Practical Application of Science to Problems in Peace and War (Queen’s University at Kingston, 1994), programs for dinners of the Royal Canadian Engineers 3rd Field Engineer Regiment and the Royal Canadian Signals 11th Signal Regiment, a presentation copy of Donald Y. Solandt’s Highways to Health, and a resolution by Donald M. Solandt (Omond and Donald’s father) to the Presbyterian Synod of Manitoba in 1915.

The second section of this series consists of diaries and daybooks (largely the latter), beginning with an account of Dr. Solandt’s trip to Europe in the summer of 1929 while he was an undergraduate at the University of Toronto. Dr. Solandt kept only the occasional diary, of which three are represented in this series. The first is for May, 1945 as the war ended in Europe. The last two both cover his trip to Japan in October-December, 1945 to study the effects of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These diaries are followed by "CDRB's U.K. Visit" (undated); an account book of Solandt's visit to the United Kingdom in November, 1966, and his American address book.

The remainder of the volumes in this series are daybooks and “pocket diaries”, of which Dr. Solandt created a large number. In the former, usually with the manufacturer’s label of as “diary” or “date book”, he recorded his appointments and, occasionally, his expenses and other related notations. These date from 1941, when he first went to Lulworth, to 1988. The volumes for 1945, 1947,1948, 1957, 1958, 1979, and 1986 are absent, either because they were never kept or, perhaps, were not written up in the same manner. For 1945, for instance, there are entries for January, June, and July in two different volumes, but none for the whole year. For two years (1956; 1971, where the second volume has "Mayo Muir" below Dr. Solandt's name and the entries are not in his hand) there are two volumes.

The "pocket diaries" complement the appointment books. The earliest year represented is 1945, the latest, 1988. There are no volumes for 1948-1951, 1953, 1957, and 1959-1965. For 1958, there are also two volumes containing notes on Dr. Solandt's European trip in March and appointments for another in July, and "at a glance" volumes both for 1958 and 1959.

For accounts of travel experiences, either for pleasure or work, see Series 11: Canoe trips and Series 13: Travel.

Photographs

The photographs in this series document portions of Dr. Solandt’s life. There are a half dozen spanning the years 1949 to 1978, and there is one studio photograph of Andrew Lawrence (Laurie) Chute, a former fellow medical student at the University of Toronto and colleague in wartime Britain. There are two folders of colour photoprints by David Grenville of Dr. Solandt at his residence, the Wolfe Den, near Bolton, Ontario and of his last visit in August1986 to his ancestral haunts at Inverness, Megantic County, in the Eastern Townships of Quebec.

Research files (general)

This series consists of the general files that Mr. Grenville assembled in his attempt to write Dr. Solandt’s story. It begins with a variety of biographical information on Dr. Solandt, including curriculum vitae, tributes and obituaries, his memorial service, press clippings, and an article about him. This is followed by grant applications, a project outline, correspondence, and files on sources, family history, and Dr. Solandt’s activities (including summaries of diaries), arranged alphabetically. The principal areas of activity covered are the atomic bomb/nuclear weapons, Canadian National Railway, Defence Research Board, forestry, medical research, operational research, the Science Council of Canada, and ‘voyaguers’. The photographs associated with some of the files have been removed and stored separately.

Heritage Associations

Records in this series document Prof. McIlwraith active involvement in various conservation groups or initiatives. It includes records relating to his time on the Ministry of Culture, Conservation Review Board of which he was a member and vice chair. Drawing on his academic expertise, he often prepared reports for the Board on properties under review. As a Board member he also acted as one the adjudicators for cases brought before the Board. Other committees documented here are the Cultural Policy Advisory Committee for the Mississauga Arts Council, Mississauga Local Architecture Conservation Advisory Committee (LACAC), and the Erindale College Plaque Committee.

Files contain reports, memos, correspondence and, in some cases, hand drawn maps and photographs.

Field Trips

This series documents field trips taken and organized by Prof. McIlwraith beginning in 1963 while still a geography student at the University of Toronto. Most of the files however document field trips that were organized and led by Prof. McIlwraith as part of the Erindale College Field Studies Courses - GGR 301 and GGR 319.

Many of the field trips required students to undertake oral histories in various Ontario Townships. Files include correspondence, memos, notes, forms, photographs and logistical information handed to students. Tapes and transcripts relating to these Field Trips have been deposited in local archives.

Graphic material

This series documents Edith Williams' life, beginning with photoprints of her as a baby, taken probably late in 1900 or 1901, and ending with a colour photoprint of her in old age. In between are numerous black-and-white and several colour photoprints of her at various stages of her life and involved in a variety of activities, including mountain climbing. There are several photoprints of her with Frieda and of Frieda herself. There are also two photoprints of other members of her family as young children, including her elder sister, Betty.

Research: general files

Beginning in the mid-1920s and even after her retirement in 1965, Dr. Fraser carried on research at the University of Toronto. For the first twenty years, usually with her brother, Donald, her research concentrated on the development of scarlet fever and other antitoxins. This research formed part of ongoing studies of certain aspects of infection and immunity in pneumonia, diphtheria, and scarlet fever, often in conjunction with health departments across Canada. It also involved the testing of products and the monitoring of scarlet fever outbreaks.

As the Second World War began, she started investigating the incidence of agglutinative types of strains of haemolytic streptococcus in a small scarlet fever ward at the Riverdale Isolation Hospital. Through the use of exacting technical procedures, she was able to prove the transfer of agglutinative types from one patient to another in the same ward. She continued work in this field and, in 1941-1942, by examining cultures from 650 people, was able to identify the incidence of particular types of streptococci in various groups of persons. The techniques perfected proved of particular use in studying the outbreak of scarlet fever in Royal Canadian Air Force bases across southern Ontario between 1941 and 1944. In 1942-1943 she worked on the preparation of a combined antigen containing diphtheria toxoid, tetanus toxoid, and tannic acid precipitate of scarlet fever toxin.

During the war, her research also included the development of penicillin, especially in relation to the campaign to combat venereal disease. From January, 1944, in co-operation with the penicillin committee of the armed forces, she conducted a bacteriological investigation of clinical material from patients treated with penicillin. At the same time she was actively engaged in the investigation of two antibiotics, streptothricin and streptomycin.

After the War Dr. Fraser continued her laboratory and clinical studies in antibiotics. One aspect of her research, between 1946 and 1948, was to test the effectiveness of penicillin in oil and wax in the treatment of gonorrhoea. In 1947, as a member of team including researchers from the Department of Botany, she spent much of her available time testing a group of new strain of micro-organisms for their activity against selected cultures. A number of new preparations of penicillin designed to prolong its action were also tested on laboratory animals and then on humans, this project extending into 1949. Further refinements in the testing of the effectiveness of penicillin were continued the next year.

In 1948 Dr. Fraser began a major study of antibiotic substances with special reference to tubercle bacillus and gram-negative cocci. A year later she was studying the antibiotic activity of several strains of penicillin against gram-negative bacilli of the enteric group. In 1950 she began another two-year project, studying the toxicity and protective effect of partially purified antibiotic substances isolated from fungi, utilizing
samples of Arctic soil. She also investigated the conditions for the production of antibiotics in deep culture.

In 1952 she began expanding on earlier research by exploring methods for the concentration of antibiotic from one of the strains of penicillin previously studied. The following year she was investigating methods for the electrophoresis on paper strips of vaccinia virus and a strain of bacteriophage, research that continued to be refined over the next several years with particular references to viruses. By 1957 she was beginning chemical tests of the fractions obtained by electrophoresis separation. Simple synthetic media were also developed for the propagation of phage on a non-pathogenic mycobacterium. In the late 1950s and the early 1960s Dr. Fraser's principal research was in a major project on the development of the anti-tuberculosis antigen, compound 377.

The eight boxes in this series contain research notes, background material, correspondence, data, articles and reports. The associated nine boxes of records of laboratory experiments are found in the next series.

The series begins with three boxes (019-021) of mimeographed and printed articles, and reports, and research notes on areas of interest, especially scarlet fever, tuberculosis, cultures, penicillin, electrophoresis, rheumatic fever, serum sickness, smallpox, spectrophotometry staphylococcus, streptococcus and venereal disease. The arrangement is largely alphabetical by topic.

Box 022 contains applications for, reports on, and correspondence regarding research grants for the years 1944-1964, on projects such as testing the effectiveness of penicillin, on new antibiotics, the electrophoresis of viruses, and tuberculosis vaccine trials.

Boxes 023 and 024 contain correspondence, notes, Dick, skin and lethal test results for research on scarlet fever streptococcus toxin production, and papers describing the results. Included are data for tests on rabbits, in schools, isolation hospitals, the Ontario School for the Deaf, orphanages, and students in the Public Health Nursing program at the University of Toronto. Much of this research was carried out at
the Connaught Laboratories, and the researchers corresponded with several other research institutes including the Richardson Pathological Laboratory at Queen's University.

Box 025 contains files on scarlet fever outbreaks amongst the Royal Canadian Air Force and other military personnel in bases across Ontario between 1941 and 1944. There are also more files of correspondence, notes, and reports, primarily from the 1930s and the early 1940s, on the development of scarlet fever antitoxin, on testing the effectiveness of penicillin in oil and wax in the treatment of gonorrhoea, and on the survival of streptococci and staphylococci in various products. The files from the 1950s relate largely to work on bacteria and viruses and to research methodology.

Box 026 contains the last general research files in this series. The correspondence, data, and reports are associated with a the development of compound 377. Sensitivity tests, clinical and drug trials were carried out at the Mountain Sanatorium in Hamilton, at the Toronto Hospital for Tuberculosis in Weston, and in London and Woodstock.

Works of Art

Frieda Fraser was a amateur artist who sketched most of her life. While she drew only for herself and her friends, the items in this series, and scattered through her correspondence and notebooks elsewhere, demonstrate more than a little talent. Dr. Fraser had a good eye for form (human, animal, or nature) and the small events in life that amused her. Her letters to Bud are a particularly revealing source of her artistic humour.

The earliest sketch here is one she made as a child on 30 September, 1906 and the latest date from 1964. Included are two fine watercolours, untitled but probably of the Go Home Bay area where she often vacationed. Dr. Fraser also experimented with block printing and there are several examples in this series.

Graphic material

This series consists of photoprints, some photonegatives (including nitrate negatives), and slides documenting the activities of the Fraser family over two and more generations. While most of the images document the activities of Frieda and Bud, individually and together, there are numerous images of other members of the family, especially at the cottage at Go Home Bay and, occasionally, in other places such as the mountains of British Columbia. There are also a few images of relatives in Germany and some of colleagues and friends.

This series has not been arranged. Boxes 003 to 010 contain photoprints and negatives, with the occasional slide. Boxes 011 to 014 contain slides.

Correspondence

The letters in this series consists of letters received by Frieda from Bud, from her friends and family. Frieda and Bud were separated for long periods in the 1920s and the 1930s and did not live together until the end of the 1930s, following the death of Frieda's grandmother. The house they shared, on the Niagara escarpment near Burlington, had been purchased by Frieda's mother some years earlier. Built in 1834, it was sited on a large acreage with an orchard on the slope behind. When apart they wrote to each frequently, often every day and sometimes more than once a day.

Some of the correspondence in undated, but only a few letters pre-date 1925 and these are from Frieda's college friends. Most of the letters were written by Bud to Frieda, between about 1925 and 1942. They cover all aspects of their lives, including relationships with their families and friends and how same-sex love was perceived.

For the period up to 1950, the remainder of the correspondence is from friends whom Frieda retained in adulthood, along with a few letters from and about members of her family, including relatives in Germany. There are fewer than a half-dozen letters for the period between 1950 and the mid-1960s.

Nearly all the later correspondence dates from 1976 to 1979, the very trying years during which Bud struggled with the effects of her stroke. Letters and cards poured in from concerned colleagues, friends, and relatives. Those addressed to Frieda and Bud jointly are filed in this series; those addressed to Bud alone are filed in Series 2 in Sous-fonds 3. Only a representative sampling of the cards have been retained.

Graphic material

This series consists of photoprints and photonegatives taken by or belonging to W. H. Fraser and his wife, Helene. Included are formal and casual family snapshots, photoprints and negatives of a trip to Europe in 1905, and several images taken during World War I.

Research and Publications

The series partially documents Francess Halpenny’s research and publishing activities relating to publishing generally, Canadian libraries, Canadian theatre and Royal Society of Canada fellows, from 1969 to 1996. The series also partially documents her participation into activities of the Literary History of Canada’s editorial board from 1984 to 1990.

The series consists of 8 files including working notes, drafts (some hand written), correspondence, minutes of meetings, grant application and reviews.

Royal Society of Canada

The series partially documents Francess Halpenny’s participation into activities of the Royal Society of Canada, from 1982 to 1991. It partially documents her participation to the Royal Society of Canada centennial celebrations, in 1982 ; her involvement as a member and president of the Academy of Humanities and Social Sciences Council, also called Council Academy II, from 1982 to 1988. The series also partially document Halpenny’s involvement in promoting women’s place in scholarship by participating into activities of the Affirmative Action Committee in 1988 and 1989 ; by giving lectures and talks about women in scholarship during a tour of the Maritimes in 1990 ; by participating in the discussion “Women in scholarship : One step forward, two steps back?” at the Society’s annual meeting in Victoria (British Columbia), in 1990 ; and by participating into the conception of the booklet "Claiming the Future".

The series consists of 10 files including minutes of meetings, personal notes, drafts of reports, correspondence, press releases and press clippings. The series also includes 2 photographs of Dr. Halpenny taken during the Society’s annual meeting in Winnipeg, 1986 ; one photograph with Professor Laurent Dennis during a reception at the Faculty of Library and Information Science reception in honour of her election to the Royal Society of Canada.

Royal Canadian Air Force. Women's Division

The series partially documents Francess Halpenny’s activities with the Women’s Division of the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) as a meteorological observer in Torbay (Newfoundland) in 1943 and 1944, and in Summerside (Prince Edward Island) in 1945. It also partially documents her contribution to the RCAF publication, "Wings Overseas", in 1943 and 1944.

The series consists of 4 files including registration certificates, a library card, personal notes about the life at Torbay, correspondence and copies of "Wings Overseas" and "Summerside" publications. It also includes one copy of publication "Per Ardua: A pictorial History of the RCAF, Torbay 1944" ; a photograph of Halpenny’s class at the weather course for airwomen, RCAF, Toronto, Ontario, December 1942 ; Halpenny’s badges and insignia, [1943-1945] ; and a thank you note received from Theodore L. Wiacek family, after his death in 1998.

Honours and Awards

The series documents the honours and awards received by Francess Halpenny during her career. It also documents the lectures and seminars she gave as Distinguished Visitor at the University of Alberta in 1989.

The series consists of 20 files including correspondence, ceremony proceedings, diplomas, convocation addresses, personal notes and press clippings. The series also contains 92 photographs of Halpenny taken during various convocation ceremonies or with dignitaries.

Theatre

The series partially documents Francess Halpenny’s involvement as a performer in theatre productions with the Village Players company, later the New Play Society, from 1939 to 1947. It also partially documents her involvement as a performer, director and/or author with the University Alumnae Dramatic Club, later the Alumnae Theatre, from 1946 to 1993, including the first time played in Canada production of Samuel Beckett’s "Waiting for Godot" in 1958. Most of the 1940s and 1950s productions of the University Alumnae Dramatic Club were also performed during Central Ontario region and/or national edition of the Dominion Drama Festival.

The series consists of 52 files including programmes, press clippings, correspondence, drafts and annotated scripts. It also includes a souvenir book of the 1st Stratford Festival ; Halpenny’s article about the history of the University Alumnae Dramatic Club, published in the Graduate, 1968 ; a program for the tribute to Dora Mavor Moore at the St. Lawrence Centre, 30 November 1971 ; and an Exhibition catalogues for the exhibit "Dramatis Personae: An Exhibition of Amateur Theatre at the University of Toronto", presented at the University of Toronto Archives in 1986 and 1992. The series also includes photographs of play scenes ; a studio portrait of Halpenny in costume for Mistress Quickly in "Henry V" production, by J. Roy Kemp, 1941 ; a photograph of Marion Jones, Francess Halpenny, Herbert Wittaker, Ruth Norris and John Colicos when being attributed the award for the best play at the Central Ontario Drama Festival, 1951 ; a photograph of L. C. Tobias presenting the best supporting actor award to Francess Halpenny for her contribution in the play "Uncle Vanya", 1955.

Photographs

Series consists of photographs, glass plates and negatives relating to H.A.Innis' education, travels and career at the Department of Political Economy.
Includes: Innis family photoprints and negatives; military photoprints of Harold Innis during World War I; graduation portraits of Innis from McMaster University; photoprints taken while Innis was on holiday on the MacKenzie River, in Churchill, Manitoba, and in Russia; group photoprint of the staff of the Dept. of Political Economy; passport photos of Harold Innis; various unidentified photoprints.

Graphic material

This series consists of photographs related to Rodney Bobiwash's professional and personal activities. The majority of the photographs are professional in nature and document Bobiwash's participation in conferences and seminars around the world. Many of the photographs are from the late 1990s and early 2000s when Bobiwash was working for the Center for World Indigenous Studies. Many photographs in series 10 are related to other series in the accession; see the notes section in series 1-9 for related photographs. The photographs are arranged in alphabetical order, except for box /004P, which is arranged chronologically.

Intermediate Dynamics (unpublished)

This series contains correspondence, notes, captions, diagrams and complete typescript of the unpublished manuscript written by Derek Paul entitled Intermediate Dynamics, a textbook for undergraduate students in physics to be published by Prentice-Hall,Inc. Chapter titles are: the principles of dynamics, particle motion in one and two dimensions, central forces, perturbations of elliptic orbits in the plans of the ellipse, particle motion in three dimensions, systems of many particles, and the rigid body and its motion in three dimensions.

For photoprints for frontespiece and chapter 5 see B1995-0020/001P(01).

Peace and International affairs

Prof. Paul's involvement in peace activities dates from the mid-1970's. Included are correspondence, reports, briefs, papers etc from international conferences such as the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute conference on "Technical aspects of control of fissionable materials in non-military applications" (1978), the Canadian Study Group on Arms Control and Disarmament located on the University of Toronto campus and the 40th Anniversary Potsdam Conference. Also included are unpublished and published articles and papers, clippings, colour photoprints and negatives of participants at the Conference on Security and cooperation in Europe.

Graphic Records

This series consists of several hundred photographs and negatives taken as part of Prof. Lee’s research on the !Kung San including portraits of individuals, images of village life, hunting, ceremonies, rituals etc.. There are also slides taken during field trips to Botswana, Kenya, South Africa, Rhodesia and several others African countries . There are also slides of an early field trip to a native reserve at Heron Bay in 1960 on the North shore of Lake Superior. Finally, there is one file of images taken at the New Native Resistance symposium in Toronto in 1972.

Photographs

B2003-0024/001P:

  • Photographs and slides, unidentified and identified, relating to research projects and writings, with no associated textual records. Includes photos for Anderson’s 1968 paper, “The Serpent Mounds site physical anthropology”, Royal Ontario Museum Arts and Archaeology Division Occasional Paper 11.

B2003-0024/002P:

  • Basal view of skulls (6), including El Risco and Donaldson sites
  • “Dallas”, site 117 (?). Two panels of six cranial photos each

Research

Throughout his career, Dr. Fowler conducted numerous studies relating to infants, toddlers and school age children. Some of these have been highlighted in the previous series and relate to his long time interest in twins, day care, child rearing and the impact of developmental stimulation.

This series contains only a sampling of the voluminous original and secondary research materials collected and compiled by Dr. Fowler. Much of the original data containing personal identifiers of children has not been retained for obvious privacy and ethical reasons. Represented in this series are files relating to research spanning some 25 years on topics such as reading, cognitive style, language stimulation and development (with specific reference to the Italian and West Indian studies), and specific studies such as the Bassari, Manitoulin Island and Woodbine Day Care. Files may contain correspondence, drafts of manuscripts, notes, cumulative data, original forms developed by Dr. Fowler for a specific study, notes, and reports. The Bassari project is also documented in photographs showing Dr. Fowler at work in the field.

Biographical materials

This small series consists of two files containing Dr. Fox's curriculum vitae and a single file relating to his University of Toronto grades, notification of Ph.D conferral from the University of London and miscellaneous academic related materials. It provides a valuable guide to Dr. Fox's professional activities and accomplishments. Also included are three portraits of Dr. Fox taken at various times throughout his career (1964-1984) and a cassette tape sound recording of his retirement dinner tribute, 26 March 1986.

Co-operative Housing Case Study: interim and final reports

This series includes five bound interim reports to the Ministry of Urban Affairs on the progress of this research study, as well as notes for the sixth interim report. It also includes correspondence, working notes and drafts of the four-volume, eight-chapter final report published in 1975 by the Centre for Urban & Community Studies for the Ministry of Urban Affairs.

Co-operative Housing Case Study: background materials & research

In addition to the attendance at meetings of CHAT and ASC board, staff and member meetings, and interviews and surveys of users and non-users, the researchers also collected background material on the Ashworth Square Housing Co-operative, and the United Church of Canada Board of Evangelism and Social Service National Housing Committee as one of its main funding bodies.

The background materials on the Ashworth Square Housing Co-operative itself include architectural drawings of the suite plans, a copy of the original proposal for its development, a copy of the occupancy agreement and by-laws, as well as general publicity for the co-op and information regarding the initial election of members to the Board of Directors. There are also seven b/w photographs of co-op members and children. The background materials on the United Church of Canada Board of Evangelism and Social Service National Housing Committee includes minutes of meetings of both the housing committee and the Technical Subcommittee, correspondence, reports, a brief on housing to Hon Paul Hellyer (Minister of Transport).

Professors Breslauer and Andrews also conducted research into housing issues, and co-op housing alternatives across Canada, the US and abroad. These files include information on the Co-op Housing Foundation, and the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation papers on co-op housing and in particular, on the Ashworth Square Housing Co-op. They also include information on co-op housing conferences, other housing co-operatives and organizations, and general housing issues and research published during this time period. Included in this series is a CBC radio special on housing cooperatives which includes a piece on the ASC.

Photographs and slides

The photographs, slides and contact prints in this series consist mainly of images associated with the textual records and usually removed from them. The arrangement relates directly to the textual series of which they are part and then arranged chronologically within.

Manuscripts and publications

Professor Urban’s writings focus on the relationship between art and architectural design. Six of his publications are present in this series. Some of those that appeared before 1986 and all published afterward are absent. His earliest writing are based on his involvement with Networks Limited in Halifax, then on collaboration with New York City artist Brian Boigon, and finally on his research in Italy in the 1980s.

Lectures and criticism

Frederic Urban gave a number of addresses as a visiting artist and lecturer. In 1979 he was a visiting artist at Ohio State University, where he photographed a number of student street performances. In October 1981 he was guest lecturer with the Venice Study Abroad Program run by the Department of Architecture at the University of Toronto. The following year he was a guest lecturer at University College in the University of Toronto for Larry Richard’s course, “Introduction to architecture”. In 1984 and 1985 he gave lectures
on his Sacri Monti project at Carleton University and the University of Toronto. In 1991 he
was a visiting lecturer at the University of Wisconsin at Stout. Some of the addresses are documented in this series. For related correspondence, see Series 2.

Professor Urban was a member of the Board of Directors of the Sharon Temple Museum Society from 1996 to 2001 and he and Larry were invited to participate in a series of readings and performances.

Studio work, exhibitions and performances

This series begins with Frederick Urban’s formative years as an artist when he created a large number of exhibits and participated in some performance pieces, primarily in Halifax and New York City. For some of these, he drew on his personal experiences. Two examples are An Acadian genealogy (April 1977), inspired by his family roots in the Acadian region of Brunswick, and Monk (July 1977) by his training as a novice in 1961-1962.

The files cover his years at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (1976-1977), continue through his post-graduate studies at the Whitney Museum of American Art, his interest in the art and architecture of Italy (spurred on by his meeting Giuseppe Panza di Biumo), and several installations connected to Canadian architecture and architectural history. The last exhibition, ‘The place of work’, accompanied the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada’s annual conference in Winnipeg in 1989. The arrangement is primarily chronological.

The series ends with several files on performance pieces, the most significant being Anne Wilson and her Butler’s lives of the saints, which was performed both in Halifax and New York City, and an oversized folder of posters for exhibitions and performance pieces collected by Urban.

Some of the exhibitions and performance pieces contain correspondence, drawings and sketches, photographs and/or slides. A number are represented by a combination of photographs and slides or slides alone, with no textual accompaniment. There are also several oversized folders of sketches and drawings for of posters for exhibitions and performance pieces with which Urban was involved and one of posters for events which he may have attended but to which he did not contribute.

Research

Frederick Urban had a passionate interest in the art and architecture of Italy and much of his research, after his studies at the Whitney Museum of Modern Art, was focussed on that country. He received grants for two projects in Italy, “The Sacri Monti of Northern Italy” (1985-1989) and for his “House/Custoza” project (1985). The other principal grants funded his visiting professorship at Nanjing Institute of Technology/South East University in Nanjing, China in 1987 and 1988, the files for which are found in Series 4.

This series begins with general files on the Sacri Monti research project, including corres-pondence and grant applications, literature, maps, general research material, photographs, posters, and some tracings. There are also files for each year that Urban was in Italy, arranged chronologically. They document his itinerary and contain correspondence, a sampling of programs and brochures, programs for the Biennale of Venice (1985), and one journal (1986).

The series ends with files on exhibitions and performances of interest, along with a selection of slides, photoprints, postcards and posters. There is a folder of cards, notices and programs for a number of exhibitions and performances, primarily Canadian (1978-1992), followed by cards and catalogues for particular exhibits: Christo (1979-1982), Creative Time (including Butler’s lives of the saints), Garry Neil Kennedy, Miami University Art Museum, The New Yorker, and Andy Warhol/Jamie Wyeth. The slides are of ‘design elements’, raves in Toronto, the Toronto Sculpture Garden, and ‘Women study’. The photoprints are of streetscapes in Toronto, taken in the early 1980s. There are ‘Special postcards’ [design elements] collected by Urban, postcards of photographs taken by the British photographer, Frank Sutcliffe, ‘Die einrichtungen der Akaademie der Kűnste der DDR’ (1979), and ‘The theatre of architecture’ by Susan Speigel (Toronto, 1986).

Employment

The records in this series document Frederic Urban’s employment record up to 1999. There are files on his public school teaching in Massachusetts, his being a director of Networks Ltd. in Halifax, his years at the University of Waterloo, including his visiting professorship in
China, his year as a director of the S. L. Simpson Gallery, and his employment by the University of Toronto. The arrangement is by position of employment.

The first few files contain primarily correspondence and, in the case of his employment at the University of Waterloo, outlines of courses he taught, Architecture 192 and 193.
There are, in addition, a large number of slides relating to his teaching activities there. The
material relating to Urban’s years at the University of Toronto consists almost entirely of teaching slides.

Urban was occasionally asked to photograph the work of architects and designers. The two examples in this series are from 1982: photographs of “Haig House” as redesigned by George Baird and slides of Melvin Charney’s A Toronto Construction, built at 139 King Street East.

The last three boxes of this series document Urban’s activities as visiting professor, Nanjing Institute of Technology (renamed South East University in May 1988), Nanjing, China, in 1987 and 1988. The files contain correspondence relating to the exchange program and with professors and students, background material, briefing books, journals, lecture notes and student exercises, exhibition material, memorabilia, the report Urban wrote on his return, and press clippings. Accompanying these files is a selection of photographs and slides. Box 011 contains the drawings done by his students.

The series ends with files on the S. L. Simpson Gallery and slides used for lectures at the University of Toronto between 1992 and 1999. The slides are arranged by year, where identified as such.

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