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Articles, Manuscripts, Addresses

This is an extensive series, which documents Dr. Hogg's publishing activities. Since many of her published articles were addresses delivered at symposiums or reports made to professional committees, addresses and talks have also been included in this series. The files, usually titled by the name of the article, book or publisher contain not only manuscripts and drafts but related correspondence, notes, memos and outlines.

The arrangement of this series is as follows, starting from general articles to the specific endeavour

  • Bibliographies and lists of publications
  • General articles, addresses, contributions to encyclopedias
  • Obituaries
  • Academic Papers on Star Clusters
  • Bibliography and Catalogue of Star Clusters
  • Contributions to "Out of Old Books"
  • "The Stars Belong to Everyone"
  • Toronto Star Column
  • Miscellaneous Writings
  • Reprints

Records in this series document both Dr. Hogg's stature as an authority on variable stars and star clusters as well as her role as a teacher of popular astronomy. Draft articles and related notes and correspondence on numerous scientific papers as well as files documenting her contribution to encyclopedias and handbooks reflect both of these roles.

Notably, her work on various editions of "A Catalogue of Variable Stars in Globular Clusters" (1st ed. 1939, 2nd ed. 1955, 3rd. ed. 1973 and 4th incomplete), as well as her time spent on "A Bibliography of Individual Globular Clusters" (1947, 1st supplement 1963) is extensively documented through drafts, research data, original manuscripts. These records relate specifically to the card index found in Series IV, Star Cluster Files and Index Cards.

Star Cluster Files and Index Cards

The Star Cluster files, assembled over her 40 years as an astronomer, represent the core of Dr. Hogg's research in a field for which she is an authority and from which many of her published articles were derived. The files are variously comprised of raw data, calculations, correspondence, draft and published articles relating to specific globular clusters. Prints from photographic plates also accompany some files . Most files are titled according to the New General Catalogue number, e.g. NGC 6626, of the star cluster and are arranged numerically following Dr. Hogg's own filing system.

A set of ten boxes of bibliographic index cards accompanies the Star Cluster Files. Cards in boxes seem to relate to specific subjects ie. external galaxies, variables in clusters, interstellar absorption. Boxes /044 - /048 are arranged more or less chronologically by the date of the bibliographic references. All were used for various editions of "A Catalogue of Variable Stars in Globular Clusters". Box B1994-0002/048 appears to relate specifically to references used in "A of Bibliography of Individual Globular Clusters" and its supplement. Index cards in box B1994-0002/049 do not appear to be bibliographic references but rather relate information on specific star clusters and are arranged by NGC number.

Photographs have been left in their original files because of their immediate association with the research materials. It was feared that removal of these photos from individual files would obscure the meaning of both the research in the file and the photographs themselves.

Personal

Contains personal correspondence mainly documenting Hollander’s achievements including many congratulatory notes from colleagues regarding awards or the publication of his major works.

Correspondence and related documents also document his appointment as University Professor and the campaign beginning in 1991 to procure for him a Nobel Prize in Economics. Also documented are his appointments through the University ranks, his salary, and the awarding of grants to support his research including activity reports and grant applications.

This series also contains records collected by Hollander over his academic and professional career, and includes various graduate school lecture notes, school transcripts, honorary degrees, and a heavily annotated copy of David Ricardo’s book Principles of Political Economy which he kept separate from other professional and academic papers.

Filed at the beginning of each accession is his most updated C.V. at the time the records were acquired (see B1998-0027/001(1) and B2012-0018/001(1)). There is also a portrait of Hollander, to be found in B1998-0027/001P.

Graphic materials

Photography was a hobby of Hull's and consequently this accession contains some of his work as it pertains to the University community, the Department of Computer Science, his career and his involvement in the Arts and Letters Club. Includes colour 4x6 prints and corresponding negatives.

Includes:

Dept. of Computer Science, Party and Show, ca. 1981
Portrait, Chancellor of Trinity College, 1981?
Hull's retirement dinner, May 1987
University of Toronto Women's Association Art Show, Oct 1987
UTWA, Art Show, Nov 1989
Visit of Eric Infeld , 1995
Photos of staff of the Department of Computer Science taken for DCS brochure (identified), 1996
Photograph of Hull receiving an Honourary Degree from Dalhousie University, 1987

Negatives to prints

hotographs and negatives documenting events of the Arts and Letters Club especially the annual Spring Show and the Boar's Head Dinner, 1987-1993. (unprocessed)

Biographical

This series gives researchers a good overview of Prof. Hume’s career and highlights. It includes biographical sketches, C.V., clippings, awards and correspondence regarding his various appointments. Photographs of Prof. Hume and relating to his career have also been placed in this series including portraits, a photo of Prof. Hume at a 1969 IFIP meeting and early computer installations in the Computer Centre. Finally, there is one framed painting of the Sanford Fleming building that hung in his office.

Talks and addresses

This series documents Prof. Hume’s talks and addresses on various subjects. General interest topics often discussed the growth of computers in society, changes in technology, and the development of computer languages. These were written for general public consumption at invited lectures. There are also a few talks on physics.

More technical talks and addresses focused on computer programming, computer graphics, and computer languages such as TRANSCODE, FORTRAN and Turing. These were most often delivered at professional meetings and symposiums. Prof. Hume recorded a series of lectures with accompanying slides on FORTRAN and another computer language called LISP. These were recorded as a type of tutorial on how to use the University’s computer and were designed to teach computer programming to a wide range of academic users at the University of Toronto. This series contains a copy of the tapes on reel to reel as well as some of the accompanying slides - although it is not clear exactly how they originally matched up. Of particular note are the very early views of the Computer Center and its computers that were included in the slide lecture showing the IBM 650, the IBM 7090 and the IBM 7094.

Files are arranged chronologically with undated talks placed at the end. They contain notes, copies of the talks, overhead transparencies, related event programs and correspondence. In addition, there is a card index of talks that essentially gives outlines and notes. Some of these are related to files in this series while others are unique talks. Apart from the FORTRAN lectures, there is one taped lecture of Prof. Hume giving a key note address at the New College Honours Students dinner.

Broadcasting and film

Prof. Hume and Prof. Donald Ivey of the Department of Physics were pioneers in educational television, having developed their first 12 part program “Focus on Physics” in 1958. This was co-sponsored by CBC and the University of Toronto. The success of this series was followed up the next year by “Two for Physics”. Both series eventually aired on the National Educational Television (N.E.T.) in the United States. Other programs that followed include:

1960 – 15 short programs on Physics for children produced by CBC in cooperation with N.E.T. for joint use in Canada and United States

1962 – “The Ideas of Physics” – 4 programmes
1963 – “The Nature of Physics” – 5 programmes
1966 – “The Constant of Physics” – 4 programmes
All of these were for in-school broadcasts to Canadian high schools produced by CBC with the National Advisory Council on School Broadcasts

1960-1965 – 18 programmes for “The Nature of Things”, produced by CBC.
The program “The Nature of Things” is still today a staple of Canadian educational television. Hume and Ivey helped lay the foundation for such a successful broadcast run.

By 1960, their success in educational television spilled over into film where they were commissioned by the Physical Science Study Committee (PSSC) in the United States to do four films: “Frames of Reference”, “Periodic Motion”, “Universal Gravitation” and “Random Events”. All of these were created for distribution in high schools. In 1962, “Frames of Reference” won Edison Foundation award for the best science film and “Random Events” received a silver medal from the Scientific Institute in Rome.

This series contains a fairly complete set of scripts for all the titles noted above. Moreover, there is a 16 mm release print for each of the four films and one sound recording of one program from “The Constant of Physics” series. There are also still images from “Frame of Reference” and a file on the Edison Award.

For a good overview, researchers should begin by consulting reports written by Hume and Ivey for most of the television series. They detail the development of each theme. In addition, there is correspondence and contracts with CBC, correspondence with Educational Services Incorporated and the PSSC as well as program guides, clippings, published reviews, correspondence from viewers, and one 1962 audience response report for a “Nature of Things” programme.

Photographs

Series consists of photographs, glass plates and negatives relating to H.A.Innis' education, travels and career at the Department of Political Economy.
Includes: Innis family photoprints and negatives; military photoprints of Harold Innis during World War I; graduation portraits of Innis from McMaster University; photoprints taken while Innis was on holiday on the MacKenzie River, in Churchill, Manitoba, and in Russia; group photoprint of the staff of the Dept. of Political Economy; passport photos of Harold Innis; various unidentified photoprints.

Education and personal activities

The series documents Allan Irving’s activities as a doctoral candidates at the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Social Work, between 1976 and 1983 : his application and registration; the fellowship he received from the department of National Health and Welfare of Canada; lecturer position at the Faculty for Professor Albert Rose; doctoral seminars he attended, papers he prepared during his graduates years and academic results. The series also documents his membership with historical associations such as the Ontario Historical Society and the University of Tennessee’s Social Welfare History Group. The series documents Allan Irving’s applications for teaching positions in Canadian universities, from 1982 to 1994 ; his nomination for the Ontario Confederation of University Faculty Association’s Teaching Award in 1994, nomination prepared by Marion Bogo, associate professor and acting dean of the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Social Work, and Mary Lee. This series also partially documents Irving’s friendship with professors and/or colleagues.

The series consists of 37 files including application for fellowship and report on his doctoral work at the intention of the department of National Health and Welfare of Canada ; statements of academic records ; library card; seminar notes; working notes, bibliographies, drafts and final version of papers (some annotated) ; curriculum vitae ; letters of support ; personal correspondence and press clippings. The series also includes one photograph of Allan Irving with James Gripton’s son, Stuart, at the age of 6 in Calgary (Alberta) ; one photograph of Ernie Lightman’s daughter, Naomi.

University of Toronto. Administrative activities

This series documents Allan Irving’s appointment at the University of Toronto Faculty of Social Work (FWS), his promotions, workload and salary progression from 1985 to 1999; his participation into administrative activities at the FWS as a member of various committees and groups. It also partially documents his exchanges with Faculty colleagues ; his participation into a debate on Faculty fundraising campaign in the corporate sector and over the adoption of the FSW strategic plan ; his participation to some Faculty social events such as retirement reception for Donald Bellamy, Elspeth Latimer and Dot Ross, and other events like graduation parties. This series also documents his participation into activities of the Office of the Governing Council’s Academic board in 1992 and 1994 ; his participation into activities of the University of Toronto Faculty Association as chairperson for the Academic freedom committee in 1996 and 1997, and as FSW’s representatives on the Grievance committee in 1998 ; his participation into activities of the selection committee for the Quality student experience award of the University of Toronto Alumni Association in 1994 ; his participation into activities of various Ph.D. examination committees from 1989 to 1997 ; his participation into activities of the School of Graduate Studies’ committee to examine the SGS leave policy in 1990 and 1991.

The series consists of 41 files including minutes of meetings, diaries, reports, addresses, correspondence and press clippings. It also includes a photograph of a canvas sent by Terence Stone, MSW student ; a photograph of FSW 80th anniversary committee members ; the sound recording of Irving’s address given at the authors’ reception of the 80th anniversary celebration of the Faculty of Social Work (B2000-0022/001S).

Research files

This series partially documents Allan Irving’s research activities and interest in the field of history of social work from 1978 to 1998. Irving used these thematic files in preparing courses and/or publications. It also partially documents his interest in current affairs.

The series consists of 25 files including articles, bibliographies, Irving’s notes and press clippings. It also includes photographs of Toronto disadvantaged neighbourhoods at the beginning of the 20th century ; photographs (slides) of Toronto in the 1940s and 1950s including streets, news papers headlines and advertisements, women at work in war factories, TTC subways and streetcars.

Only significantly annotated published material have been kept as a whole; in all other cases, only the first page and/or the bibliographical reference have been preserved

Addresses, talks and seminars

This series consists of research notes and background materials regarding India, South East Asia and Kashmir. It is arranged by subject.

Research

This series consists of research notes and background materials regarding India, South East Asia and Kashmir. It is arranged by subject.

University of Toronto

This series documents some of Prof. Israel’s activities as teacher and administrator at the University of Toronto. It includes correspondence regarding his tenure as a University of Toronto professor, especially during the period when he was vice provost (1974-1979), Director of the Graduate Centre for South Asian Studies (1981-1991), and Chairman of the Robert F. Harney Memorial Trust. Also included are files relating to the Sikh studies program, initiated after the Conference on Sikh History and Religion in the Twentieth Century (1987) organized by the Centre for South Asian Studies. According to Prof. Israel “the program became quite controversial and attracted attacks from orthodox Sikh critics both in Canada and outside”. The material on the Sikh community also includes his 1990 report prepared for the 5 Ks Interministerial Committee Government of Ontario entitled “Sikhs and their religious symbols: an Ontario perspective”.

Photographs

B2002-0009/001P(01)-(05): Sikh Studies Conference: photographs taken at a dinner in the home of Prof. Israel.
B2002-0009/001P (06)-(07): Photographs of the office in the Centre for South Asian Studies, room 2054 Sidney Smith, 1985
B2011-0004/001(18): Photographs of M. Israel at the Indo-Canadian Institute, 1980, with Canadian students, and Resident Director

Photographs

Photographs documenting Dr. Donald Ivey as well as some photos collected by Ivey documenting physics at the University of Toronto.

Included are: First Graduating class in Engineering Physics, 1938; group photo of 1954 Conference on Elastomers (with numbered guide showing Donald G. Ivey #68); Donald Ivey and Gordon Shorter at Royal Ottawa Golf Club dinner March 9 19?; opening ceremony of Canadian Voices/Creation Canadienne, May 12, 1981: Honourable James Fleming, Mrs Marvi Ricker and Dr. Ivey; portrait of Sir J.J. Thomson;

Personal

The series consists of records documenting Gilbert Edward Jackson’s family life and professional career, from the early 1920s to his death in 1959. Arranged alphabetically by function, the files of the series include: typed autobiographical notes illustrating Mr. Jackson’s life from the day he was born until 1919, prior to his emigration to Toronto; two biographical sketches highlighting key moments within Mr. Jackson’s personal and professional career; typed and handwritten incoming and outgoing correspondence from family members, friends, colleagues and acquaintances regarding the death of his son, John Denison Jackson (1944), Mrs. Maria Elizabeth Jackson’s estate (1952-1953), notes of thanks for reference letters, gifts and lunch meetings, personal regards for his family, and an unsigned letter to Misses Jackson, Mr. Jackson’s sisters regarding the economist’s declining health (1959); a handwritten copy of Mr. Jackson’s obituary (1959); and a photograph of a portrait of Mr. Jackson (B2004-0019/001P). Within the files of correspondence, the letters are arranged chronologically, except for those offering condolences to Mr. Jackson for the loss of his son which are arranged alphabetically by the last-name of the sender.

The series also consists of several files of press clippings about Mr. Jackson’s personal life, career moves, thoughts, views, as well as Canada’s economic stance on various issues. The subject matter of the newspaper clippings include: France and Germany’s economic situation after World War I; Canada’s immigration policies (1923), tariff fallacies and taxation system (ca. 1935); unemployment insurance within Canada; the analogous trading problems with England (1934); Mr. Jackson’s speech on overcoming the depression and difficulties through the improvement of the human character before the Empire Club in the Royal York Hotel (1933) and Canadian Club in Ottawa (1934); being appointed Economic Adviser to the Governors of the Bank of England (1935); the selling of Mr. Jackson’s house in Toronto prior to leaving for England (1935); the return of economic liberalism to Canada; the doctrine of free trade; and reviews about Mr. Jackson’s book An economist’s confession of faith (1935). Letters to the editor can also be found within the press clippings regarding similar themes. Arranged chronologically within their individual files, the press clippings, which are from newspapers across Canada and England, were possibly collected by Mr. Jackson.

Manuscripts and off-prints

This series consists of articles, memoranda, reports, speeches, lectures, pamphlets, off-prints and books written by Mr. Jackson over a forty year span. Within the series, a “wordage of memoranda” written by Mr. Jackson illustrating the numbers of terms utilized within articles written from 1940 to 1946 is also provided.

Documenting Mr. Jackson’s career, thought, views and influences in Canadian economics, the manuscripts document his work in: international exchange; Canada’s economic prospect and stance on trade; the economic conditions of countries such as the United States and the United Kingdom; the effects of the war(s) on Canada’s financial situation; the population and employment opportunities; unemployment; textiles and other merchandise; capitalism; conditions affecting interest rates; inflation; and the great depression.

Photographs

As a long time professor in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering, L. E. Jones photographed and collected images of many Faculty and campus events including convocations, memorials, award ceremonies, retirements and open houses. Of particular notice are images of: the Engineering Centenary celebrations in 1973: the mounting of the lintel from the Old S.P.S. building and the installation of Becca's H in front of the Galbraith building; the fire, rebuilding and reopening of the Sandford Flemming building, 1977-1982; the excavation of the site of the Old Magnetic Observatory, 1979; the design, construction and installation of the Sundial, 1993.

As Engineering Archivist, Jones also collected many historical images documenting the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering as well as its predessor the School of Practical Science. Included in this collection are portraits of faculty and students groups, images of student activities, buildings, Gull Lake Survey Camp and Ajax Campus. These photographs mainly document the first half of the 20th century.

Personal and education

This series consists of records such as her curriculum vitae, her association with the Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing, personal documents such as register of birth, certificates and diplomas relating to her nursing education at the University of Toronto, and her association as an elder with St. Andrews Presbyterian Church, Owen Sound. Records relating to her education also include her personal scrapbook of photographs, clippings, correspondence and other documents recording her years as a student of nursing in the diploma programme at the University of Toronto. This series also contains a file relating to her Honorary Doctorate in Nursing Science from the University of Turku in Finland in 1993.

In addition to photographs in the scrapbook, portrait photographs of Prof. Jones as a graduate in nursing in 1950, as Dean (ca 1979-1988) and informal photographs of the honorary degree ceremony at University of Turku will be found in /001P.

Graphic material

This series contains photoprints and slides (1966-1972) of the School of Library Science on McCaul St., Robarts Library, 140 St. George St., the ground breaking ceremony for Robarts and FLIS Buildings, group photos of former Directors of the School of Library Science, including Brian Land, Bertha Bassam, Winifred Barnstead, Francess Halpenny.

Also includes a watercolour of the old Library painted by Brian Land’s mother-in-law, ca 1920, and a drawing of the construction of Robarts done by Leslie Sirluck, ca 1969.

Graphic material

Two black-and-white photoprints of the graduating class in Arts, Victoria College, 1948. Two photographs were taken because of the large number of graduates

University of Toronto. Administrative activities

This series provides partial documentation Professor Lang’s years as a senior administrator at the University of Toronto. It begins with correspondence, primarily with President Connell, and related material regarding the Ontario Commission on the Future Development of the Universities of Ontario (the Bovey Commission), followed by later correspondence (to 1990) with him. The subsequent correspondence files end in 2010, some of which are contained on 3.5 inch floppy disks.

Professor Lang’s “general files” and “miscellaneous projects” begin with two major controversial decisions, the first being the closure of the Faculty of Food Sciences (1974) and the proposed closure of the Faculty of Architecture and Landscape Architecture (1986), with only the first being realized. The remainder of this subseries focuses on capital plans and budgeting, primarily responsibility centre budgeting as applied to Scarborough College. There are also files on Maclean’s magazine university and college surveys from the 1990s. The admission surveys from the last quarter of the 20th century also include a Maclean’s survey.

In the mid-1990s the University introduced a new electronic students’ records system (ROSI) with leadership provided by the Registrars Group. It is well documented here. Professor Lang’s activities as a senior policy advisor to the President of the University of Toronto are also documented but only for the years 2005 to 2007.

Professor Lang maintained extensive files on campus development plans and building projects from the mid-1960s to the late 1990s relating to all three campuses, including several on the Southwest Campus. There are also proposals to provide land for a new headquarters building for the Municipality of Metropolitan Toronto (1982) and facilities for the abortive bid to hold the summer Olympics in Toronto in 1996.

B2011-0003 ends with several proposals for an innovations centre and an industrial research centre at the University in the decade from the mid-1980s.

B2018-0001 includes further files related to his role as Senior Policy Advisor to David Naylor, a role in which he served until 2012. Also included are arbitration briefs and notes about a dispute between the Faculty Association and the University in 1986-1987, regarding mandatory retirement for professors.

Digital files include email correspondence with several Government of Ontario and U of T officials; files about the Maclean’s survey; and files (notes, briefts, reports) about the expansion of the number of graduate students at the University of Toronto.

The sub-titles in this series are those used by Professor Lang in his original box list. The files contain correspondence, memoranda, notes, and reports, Also included are compact discs containing certain files of correspondence and reports. The arrangement is generally by categories and chronolgically within each, with like materials grouped together.

University of Toronto Blues men's baseball team

This series documents Professor Lang’s years of service to the University of Toronto Blues Men’s Baseball team which he coached from 1994 to 2011. The files contain information on team lists, coaches, financing and fundraising, equipment, rosters and players, and statistical records. There is also some press coverage. There is documentation of tournaments in Columbus, Ohio (1998) and Durham College in Oshawa (1999). Photographs and digital images document the team from 1999-2007, including many images and graphics used to boost the website for the team Also included is an Ontario University Athletics medal for 2001.

Digital files in B2018-0001 include email correspondence with players, university officials, and sponsors; rosters and team photographs; and files related to the construction of a new baseball diamond on the University of Toronto Scarborough campus, which opened in 2006. In 2011, it was renamed the “Dan Lang field” in honour of his many years of service to the Varsity Blues baseball program.

Photographs

Photographs document the personal and professional life of Dr. W. Harding le Riche including his time as an epidemiologist in South Africa and in Canada at the University of Toronto. There are early images of le Riche and Grant ancestors, as well as the le Riche family in Pretoria. There are some early photos of the skeleton dig at the Sterkfontein caves in 1936. Portraits and snapshots cover Le Riche’s time as a student at University of Witwatersrand and at Harvard University. Many snapshots document his arrival in Canada and his family’s early years in their adopted country.

Photographs, both amateur and professional document his professional life including attending conferences making speeches and receiving awards. Events at the University are also documented including celebrations around the 50th anniversary of the discovery of insulin in 1971 and general photos of the students and faculty of the School of Hygiene (1960-70s).

Finally, le Riche had a collection of portraits of well know scientists in the public health field who would most likely have been his peers or pioneers in this field of medicine.

Accession B1989-0046

Consists of biographical files, mementoes, addresses, manuscripts and publications (1950-1988), curricula and lecture notes in epidemiology (1960's to 1976), lecture notes in public health sanitation, international health, and School of Hygiene documenting Prof. le Riche's career in epidemiology in the School of Hygiene and its successor departments. Includes photoprints.

Graphic Records

This series consists of several hundred photographs and negatives taken as part of Prof. Lee’s research on the !Kung San including portraits of individuals, images of village life, hunting, ceremonies, rituals etc.. There are also slides taken during field trips to Botswana, Kenya, South Africa, Rhodesia and several others African countries . There are also slides of an early field trip to a native reserve at Heron Bay in 1960 on the North shore of Lake Superior. Finally, there is one file of images taken at the New Native Resistance symposium in Toronto in 1972.

Correspondence

This series contains professional and personal correspondence covering the years 1952-1990. Topics covered include administrative matters in the Department of Slavic Studies, issues relating more widely to slavic studies, and Professor Luckyj's writings, including correspondence with publishers. Interspersed with this correspondence are drafts of book reviews, articles, and memorials; notes, press clippings, and photoprints. Many of the letters are written in Ukrainian, and there are a few also in Russian and French.

Photographs

Portraits of Professor Macallum; copies of illuminated address presented to Professor Macallum on 9 March 1906 by undergraduates in the Faculty of Medicine, on the occasion of his election to the Royal Society of Canada. Taken by Steffens-Colmer, Vancouver; C.T. Blackburne; Freeland, Toronto; Lafayette, Glasgow; McCaul's Pond, c. 1880. Also includes photo of McCaul's Pond, ca. 1880.

Patient files

This series contains a selection of MacIntosh’s patient files from several medical practices – the Toronto General Hospital, the Princess Margaret Hospital, Sunnybrook Hospital and the Hart House Clinic for student athletes at the University of Toronto. Included in this series are patient files for MacIntosh’s own practice at the University of Toronto’s Medical Arts Building as well as patient files and case information for the many litigations and Workers Compensation Board/Workplace Safety Insurance Board cases for which MacIntosh served as an expert medical consultant. Lastly, included in this series are a set of patient files from Drs. Allan Gross and John C. Cameron, two younger doctors who worked in the orthopedic field with MacIntosh.

Most of the files in this series contain patient intake information, background medical charts, diagnoses, treatment plans and follow-up reports. Occasionally, the patient files will include photographs and x-rays. The series is arranged in order to reflect how MacIntosh kept his patient files under several different systems. MacIntosh arranged some of his patient files based on the injury or affliction facing the patient. Other files were arranged alphabetically, and many were arranged using a numbered system. The patient files belonging to patients seen at the Hart House Clinic were also kept separately by MacIntosh.

The series also includes several different sets of patient indices, which are presumably index cards for every patient MacIntosh treated. Most of the indices are alphabetical or chronological, however there are several miscellaneous or misfiled boxes are patient index cards.

Photographs and media

This series contains photographs, glass latern slides, photographic slides and a collection of reel to reel films belonging to MacIntosh. Most of the media covers MacIntosh’s professional life: surgical images, patient photographs, procedure documentation and lecture and statistical slides. There are also a small number of personal and family photographic slides which document various family trips and events. Also included is a set of photographs of the HMS Philante, the escort vessel which MacIntosh served on with Royal Navy during the Second World War.

Personal and biographical

This series consists of Dr. Mastromatteo’s biographical and personal records. They document his career, personal life, and professional and personal relationships. This series also contains many files documenting studies, projects and issues that Dr. Mastromatteo included with his personal files. Record types include curriculum vitae, correspondence, photos, cards and certificates, articles, pamphlets, reports, notes, forms, minutes and projector slides.

The material is arranged into two sections. The first section contains personal records, career records, records documenting relationships, education records, and general files. The records are arranged in that order and filed chronologically within each of those sub-sections. The second section contains files on specific work projects or issues and is arranged chronologically.

Addresses

This series documents Dr. Mastromatteo’s research and advocacy in the form of addresses. The addresses in this series are mostly Dr. Mastromatteo’s but there are some addresses by others, possibly sent to him for review or reference purposes. There are also some small amounts of reference material filed with his addresses.

The addresses in this series are mainly about occupational health, with some on environmental issues and human rights issues as they relate to occupational health (for example workers’ compensation). Most addresses in this series were given at meetings of professional associations with a small number of talks given at private companies.

Records in this series include notes, manuscripts, correspondence, projector slides, reports and press clippings.

Professional organizations, associations and societies

This series documents Dr. Mastromatteo’s participation in organizations, associations and societies. These groups pertain mainly to medicine, occupational health and safety, and labour conditions. The largest amounts of material are from the Ontario Medical Association, the International Labor Office, the Industrial Accident Prevention Association, the Canadian Public Health Association, the Canadian Medical Association, and the Atomic Energy Control Board.

Records in this series include notes, drafts, papers, correspondence, minutes, reports and memoranda.

Photographs

As an engineering student at the University of Toronto, D. F. McCarthy was involved in a number of activities including water polo, and as a member, 4th year Executive of Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering. Included are photographs water polo teams, graduation photos for high school and university, class photographs, as a professional engineer with the City of Toronto and as an alumnus of U of T., including the Chancellor’s Circle (1994) and Arbor Award (1993). Also included is sketch by Owen Staples of “Memorial Tower University of Toronto” ca 1930.

Personal

This series includes records documenting personal family life, professional activities including position appointments, medical internship, club memberships, and participation in health related organizations at the national and international level, and honours bestowed. Amongst the last are the Gairdner Foundation International Award (1969), election to the Royal Society (1999), an honorary degree from the University of Toronto and election to the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame (both 2004).

Includes weekly appointment books, daily journals, curriculum vitae, personal and professional correspondence, minutes of meetings, certificates, and photographs.

Publications

This series consists of manuscripts, correspondence, research notes relating to published articles and chapters in books written alone or in collaboration with colleagues. Arrangement is chronologically by date of publication, although contents of file may be earlier.

The bibliographic data in the file list has been copied directly from Dr. McCulloch’s curriculum vitae and additions have been made where warranted.

Results 201 to 250 of 413