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Conferences, colloquia and symposia

This series outlines Dr. Safarian's attendance over a twenty year span at and participation in conferences, symposia and colloquia related to economic issues. Notable amongst these are the Canada-Mexico Colloquium sponsored by El Colegio de Mexico at Oaxtepac, Mexico (1967), and the Seventh World Congress of the International Economic Association held in Madrid in 1983. The series illustrates Dr. Safarian's range of economic interests as well as his contact with contemporary economists and agencies.

It consists primarily of correspondence, agendas, announcements, conference papers and reports, including some delivered by Dr. Safarian himself.  Arrangement is by title of conference.  Most are subject files that he created.

Research

This series documents various aspects of Prof Garrison’s research activities. Research files are arranged alphabetically by subject with observation notebooks placed at the end. Files contain not only data and early drafts of papers but also extensive correspondence and e-mail with the colleagues on collaborations. Early dated research files usually contain research collected by past astronomy professors and passed on to Garrison.

This series also contains copies of Garrison’s research grant applications and reports from 1987 to 2007 as well as one very early application from 1969.

University of Toronto

The series partially documents Francess Halpenny’s activities at the University of Toronto as dean of the Faculty of Library and Information Science, from 1972 to 1978, and awards received for her long service at the University of Toronto in 1977 and 1989. It also documents her participation into the activities of the research board and the humanities and social sciences committee of the Office of Research Administration, in 1979 ; her participation as coordinator into activities of the Research fair for the humanities and social sciences during the UofT Day of 1987 and 1988. The series partially documents her involvement in the Provostial advisory committee on research associates, from 1988 to 1990 ; her involvement into activities of the Department of Human Resources’ Pay equity job evaluation committee, in 1989 and 1990 ; her appointment as associate fellow of Massey College in 1989.

The series consists of 11 files including minutes of meetings, Halpenny’s notes, drafts of reports, correspondence and press clippings. It also includes her citation for Dr. Dorothy Livesay, 1987.

Teaching materials

  • CA ON00389 F4-7
  • Series
  • 1966 - 1985, 1994; predominant 1971 - 1981
  • Part of Henri Nouwen fonds

Series consists of materials created by Nouwen for use in his capacity as a professor and instructor. These materials include notes for lectures, reading notes, class lists, handouts for students, class schedules, course evaluations, audio recordings of lectures, and records related to the administration of courses.

Series has been divided into two sub-series:

1.7.1. Course handouts, lecture, reading and students notes (1966 - 1994, predominant 1972 - 1981). This sub-series also includes 14 audio recordings of Nouwen's lectures and 357 art slides which he used in his lectures on Van Gogh.
1.7.2. Administrative records (1966 - 1994, predominant 1983-1985)

Further details can be found on the sub-series description level.

Manuscripts and publications

There are only a few files in this series, consisting of some book reviews, and drafts and offprints of articles that appeared between 1968 and the early 1970s. The arrangement of the files is chronological.

Research

This series documents Gotlieb's early research, mainly in the use of computers to develop timetables. Gotlieb's interest in this area of computer application evolved from a very practical need to revamp the Arts and Science Timetable in early 1960s, a task he was assigned as a young professor. Through the 1960s, he gave many papers on the subject and his expertise was recognized internationally. However, overtime, his interests led elsewhere and his time table research was passed on to another generation of computer scientists. He is recognized internationally for laying the groundwork in this area of computer applications. There are eight files on this research containing correspondence, reports, notes and related papers.

There is also one file relating to early research on computers and music. This master’s thesis research by student Jim Gabura had as its goal to successfully develop software that could recognize music by specific composers. The file contains original research, papers, correspondence, research reports and other related material. There is also the original cassette of taped music used in the research titled as "Appendix 6 -- Recordings" (For access see /002S). This research was being done in the early 1960s.

In the early 1980s, Gotlieb participated in the Bell Canada VISTA project, a videotex system that allowed users to access computer stored information on a modified television screen. This was more or less an early attempt at a communication system like the Internet. Included is correspondence, the original agreement, notes and publications documenting the experiment. There are also slides showing what the screens of information looked like. (For access see /001P(38)-(39).

There is one other graduate project documented in this series. This is the research by student Darrell Parsons (Ph.D. 1990) looking into the use of computers as it relates to productivity in banking. This thesis research was eventually published in the Journal of Productivity Analysis as “Productivity and Computers in Canadian Banking”, by Darrell Parsons, Calvin C. Gotlieb and Michael Denny, 1993. A copy of the paper, along with correspondence, research outlines and proposals can be found in the last file of this series.

University of Toronto Administration

Although Prof. Spencer held many administrative positions within the Department of Sociology, including several terms as associate chair for Erindale, this series mainly documents her successful efforts to establish and co-ordinate an interdisciplinary Peace and Conflict Studies Programme at Erindale College. Included are the early proposals and background documentation, minutes of meeting, reports, course and program descriptions and correspondence.

Referee reviews and comments

This series provides extensive documentation of Prof. Moggridge’s role as a peer reviewer or referee for many publications, research projects and grant applications. Correspondence, referee reports, notes and applications are found throughout these files often titled “Comments on others”. Records are filed chronologically.

Seminars and Talks

This series documents attendance and participation at professional conferences, meetings and symposia. Files contain correspondence relating to attendance and the delivery of papers, as well as manuscripts of seminars and talks. They also contain general information regarding meetings including conference programs, list of participants, minutes and proceedings. Includes associations and symposia such as: the International Cell Cycle Congress, Canadian Federation of Biological Sciences, the American Society of Cell Biology and the International Congress of Physiological Sciences.

This series also includes notes and draft manuscripts for workshops and invited lectures especially relating to Zimmerman's research on narcotics and particularly marijuana in the 1970s. All files are titled most often by the institution or group hosting the seminar and are arranged chronologically.

Addresses and interviews

Dr. Hastings was much in demand as a public speaker throughout his career. In the early 1960s, for example, he often gave more than one a week and by the late 1990s he himself estimated that he had given well over 1,000 addresses. While the majority were delivered at academic and professional gatherings, he also made time to speak at community events, including graduation exercises.

This series contains lists of addresses, correspondence, notes, drafts of addresses, and, often, press coverage. The arrangement is chronological, with correspondence for which accompanying addresses have not survived being arranged in separate files. There is a substantial file of this type for 1963. Interviews are filed at the end of the addresses.

The earliest extant address is his first professional foray on the international scene, at the American Public Health Association conference in October 1954. The theme was administrative practice in relation to the quality of medical care provided under the Ontario Workmen’s Compensation Board. This address and subsequent ones follow the major themes laid out in the earlier series, especially Series 7. Those that were published are filed, for the most part, in Series 7. Some of the addresses are indicated in Appendix 2, which includes entries up to 1994.

After his retirement, Dr. Hastings’ addresses continued to focus primarily on public and community health issues. One, in 1994, was given on the occasion of the tenth anniversary of the Charles Hastings Co-operative, named after his great-uncle, Toronto’s innovative and pioneering medical officer of health. On another occasion, he spoke about the future of community health centres to the International Conference on Community Health Centres in Montreal (December 1995).

While President of the Canadian Public Health Association in 1996-1997, he travelled widely and was much in demand as a speaker. Four venues included a reception in his honour in Winnipeg, the second National Conference on Communicable Disease Control in Toronto, the World Health Organization’s Intersectional Action for Health conference in Halifax, and the annual general meeting of the Northwest Territories branch of the CPHA in Yellowknife. In 1999, after many years of long distance communication, he flew to Manitoba to address the Hamiota District Health Centre Foundation, and in November was a keynote speaker at the 50th annual conference of the Ontario Public Health Association.

In June 2000, at the annual meeting of the Association of Ontario Health Centres, Dr. Hastings reflected on a turning point in his career in his address, “The Hastings Report – then and now”. This is followed by an address delivered at the opening in October 2001 of the Institute of Population and Health, one of four Toronto-based Institutes of Health Research.

The series concludes with three interviews, one on CBC’s radio and television “Citizen’s Forum” in 1960, a ‘telepole’ on CFTO TV in 1962, and an interview with Jan Brown in February 1997.

Teaching

This series contains files relating to the teaching of a course at Trinity College - INX 199Y Science and Social Choice and includes choices of course material and assignments which were published in a handbook for the course edited by Hull. No other records relating to Hull's teaching either at Trinity or within the Department of Computer Science are known to exist.

Student files

This series includes general files on students, as well as files on individual students kept by Prof. Lemon which document their progress (mainly graduate students) as well as his assessment of them. Files contain correspondence, evaluations, theses proposals and theses, essays, comprehensive oral exams, notes and some letters of reference.

Graphic material

Includes images documenting machinery for induction heating at the Ajax Magnethermic Corporation and views of other plants and machinery such as Davey United of Sheffield England and Washington Steel. A series of slides document research-taking place in the University of Toronto, Electronic Engineering Department in 1966. There are a few views of Biringer at work.

Administration

This series reflects Professor Roots’ involvement with academic administration and academic committees within the Zoology Department as well as the larger University of Toronto. This series includes notes, correspondence, reports and documents related Roots’ role as chair of the zoology department, promotions Roots was involved in, the organization of symposiums and retreats, departmental reviews, budgeting, staffing and re-organizing the zoology department, and handling cases of academic misconduct.

Bible Project

Series consists of records relating to the Bible project of Peter Brieger and Jürgen Paul. The original idea of the project was to compile a complete collection of photographs of French and English illustrated Bibles produced between the end of the eleventh century and around the year 1270, with a focus on the iconography of their illustrations. The project likely began in the late 1950s. In 1965, Dr. Brieger met Dr. Jürgen Paul, who moved to Toronto, from Germany, in 1967 to help Dr. Brieger finish the book.

Dr. Paul helped define the focus of the book, from a multi-volume corpus of all illustrations, to a study of “questions of iconography, the variety and development in the choice of subjects for illustrating the biblical books, and to concentrate on the Old Testament. It was to be demonstrated how over the period of the two centuries changes in subjects of illustration selected were influenced by changes in Christian theological exegesis of the Old Testament.” [1] The pair worked together in an office in Sydney Smith Hall during the winter and spring of 1967/68.

The pair later organized trips to several repositories to examine manuscripts. As Dr. Paul writes, “I had already realized that the material of French and English illustrated Bible manuscripts was still incomplete. Therefore, during the summer of 1968 we, together with Mrs. Brieger, spent several weeks in England checking the college libraries in Oxford and Cambridge. It turned out that in both universities large numbers of most interesting Bible manuscripts existed that were not even registered. No catalogues existed. After the stay in England we went by car through France checking the manuscript collections in Paris and provincial libraries between Avranches and Dijon. After that, we went to Italy checking the manuscripts in the Vatican library and in Laurenziana in Florence.”

When Dr. Brieger’s health began to fail, Dr. Paul continued the project, to a lesser degree, with Ann Hilty. The project was never published.


[1] From an account written by Dr. Paul. The full account can be found in the case file for B2016-0007.

Hospital Employment

This series is comprised of most of MacIntosh’s records dealing with his employment and involvement at several hospitals, including Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto General Hospital, Mount Sinai Hospital, and The Riverdale Hospital. The series also contains material MacIntosh accumulated while serving on hospital boards and committees, as well as employment information detailing MacIntosh’s work with the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Medicine, and information on work MacIntosh completed for the Worker’s Compensation Board.

Papers

Series consists of drafts of journal and conference articles by Prof. Ng. Series also includes some contracts with publishers and indexes to articles. Files are arranged in chronological order.

Advisory Committee on Science and Medicine of the Canadian Corporation for the 1967 World Exposition

Includes mainly copies of minutes, reports, agendas and correspondence of the Advisory Committee on Science and Medicine - EXPO, of which Dr. Hogg was an active member. There are also copies of speeches given by EXPO officials. Much of the papers relate to the development of "Themes" including storylines and exhibit designs.

Interfiled with copies of minutes and reports, is some original correspondence between Hogg and members of the committee which documents, to some degree, her particular role in the committee. The most extensive original material relates to her role as chairman of one of the lectures given as part of the Noranda Lecture Series. Included is correspondence, drafts for her introductory note, and progress reports of the series. The lecture series itself, sponsored by Noranda Mines, featured a host of international scientists, including Nobel Prize Laureates and was attended by specially invited audiences during EXPO '67.

Broadcasting and film

Prof. Hume and Prof. Donald Ivey of the Department of Physics were pioneers in educational television, having developed their first 12 part program “Focus on Physics” in 1958. This was co-sponsored by CBC and the University of Toronto. The success of this series was followed up the next year by “Two for Physics”. Both series eventually aired on the National Educational Television (N.E.T.) in the United States. Other programs that followed include:

1960 – 15 short programs on Physics for children produced by CBC in cooperation with N.E.T. for joint use in Canada and United States

1962 – “The Ideas of Physics” – 4 programmes
1963 – “The Nature of Physics” – 5 programmes
1966 – “The Constant of Physics” – 4 programmes
All of these were for in-school broadcasts to Canadian high schools produced by CBC with the National Advisory Council on School Broadcasts

1960-1965 – 18 programmes for “The Nature of Things”, produced by CBC.
The program “The Nature of Things” is still today a staple of Canadian educational television. Hume and Ivey helped lay the foundation for such a successful broadcast run.

By 1960, their success in educational television spilled over into film where they were commissioned by the Physical Science Study Committee (PSSC) in the United States to do four films: “Frames of Reference”, “Periodic Motion”, “Universal Gravitation” and “Random Events”. All of these were created for distribution in high schools. In 1962, “Frames of Reference” won Edison Foundation award for the best science film and “Random Events” received a silver medal from the Scientific Institute in Rome.

This series contains a fairly complete set of scripts for all the titles noted above. Moreover, there is a 16 mm release print for each of the four films and one sound recording of one program from “The Constant of Physics” series. There are also still images from “Frame of Reference” and a file on the Edison Award.

For a good overview, researchers should begin by consulting reports written by Hume and Ivey for most of the television series. They detail the development of each theme. In addition, there is correspondence and contracts with CBC, correspondence with Educational Services Incorporated and the PSSC as well as program guides, clippings, published reviews, correspondence from viewers, and one 1962 audience response report for a “Nature of Things” programme.

Employment: University of Toronto

Professor Richards was lured to the University of Toronto in 1980 by the new Dean, Blanche van Ginkel, who had earlier recruited several new young faculty members, including Alberto Perez Gomez and Daniel Libeskind. Both had left by the time Richards arrived and he soon found out why. He “walked into a rat’s nest of warring factions. The inflexible ideologues, led by Prof. Peter Pragnell, were totally closed to student and younger faculty’s interests in post-modernism.” Richards soon became disillusioned and found reward only through the new ‘Introduction to Architecture’ course he developed and taught at University College. He also co-ordinated the 1980-1981 fourth-year core programme and (with Michael Kirkland) the fall 1981 studio in Venice [1]. After a year he left Toronto for the position of associate professor in the School of Architecture at the University of Waterloo.

Although Professor Richards maintained contact with the University of Toronto (he withdrew his candidacy for the deanship in 1985) and actually moved from Waterloo to Toronto in 1990, it was not until January 1997 that he returned to the Faculty, this time as dean, an appointment that was to last 7 ½ years. “He led a division of 22 core and 48 part-time faculty, 20 staff, and 275 graduate students, which offers three degree programs: a professional Master of Architecture, a professional Master of Landscape Architecture, and a post-professional Master of Urban Design…He gained approvals for and implemented two long-range academic plans, the 2000 PLAN and the 2004 PLAN, leading to the reinvigoration of the creative life of the school. His accomplishments included facilitating the incremental renovation of the building at 230 College Street by leading Toronto architects and establishing the Faculty’s first endowed chair, The Frank Gehry International Visiting Chair in Architectural Design, launched in 2003. He established the Faculty’s first Advancement Office and raised more than $8-million in new funding through the division’s “Design the Future” campaign. [He also]…played a key role in assisting the University with architect selection processes for major projects on its three campuses.” [2] On the St. George campus three significant buildings by international architects were erected: the Terrence Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Bimolecular Research (Alliance + Behnisch Architekten), the Leslie L. Dan Pharmacy Building (Norman Foster) and Graduate House (Morphosis, Thom Mayne).

The earliest records in the series consist of correspondence, memoranda, reports and associated material documenting Professor Richards’ stint as assistant professor in 1980-1981; the files cover the activities mentioned above. There are also files on the 1985 search for a dean and the attempt to close the School, followed by several on Richards’ appointment as dean. Files are then arranged in descending order of hierarchy, beginning with the Governing Council, its Physical Planning and Design Advisory Committee’s campus planning initiatives (concerning, especially, Graduate House), and meetings of principals, deans, academic directors and chairs. Except for the above committees, those mentioned in Professor Richards’ curriculum vitae are largely absent from this series.

The records of the School/Faculty from 1997-2007 include correspondence; Richards’ activities and his reports; budgets, the 2000 and 2004 long-range plans, and fundraising initiatives. There are files on the restructuring of courses and the renaming and repositioning of the School (using, in part, the expertise of designer Bruce Mau) and the renovations to 230 College Street (the Shore Moffatt Library and the Eric Arthur Gallery). Richards kept extensive files on trips to Japan, Hong Kong and China relating to the Faculty’s ‘Designs for Living’ cultural exchange project. The series concludes with files on the creation of the Gehry Chair; courses taught; lecture series; exhibitions; and publicity. The files on the courses taught contain course outlines, assignments, tests, examination questions, and some lectures.

[1] Personal communication from Larry Richards, 23 July 2009
[2] Drawn from Professor Richard’s curriculum vitae (June 2004), p. 3.

Social activism and peace groups

This series documents Prof. Prentices activities as a social activist and his involvement in peace groups. Some of the groups were based at the University and while others were part of larger national and international groups. The main groups include: Science for Peace including documentation on the Toronto Resolution, Faculty Committee on Vietnam, University of Toronto Men’s Forum, Pollution Probe and Canadian Concerned Scientists. There are is also files relating to peace action relating to the Vietnam and Iraqi Wars.

Files contain correspondence, memos, reports, minutes, publicity material, surveys and newspaper clippings. They are filed alphabetically by group.

Biographical materials

This small series consists of two files containing Dr. Fox's curriculum vitae and a single file relating to his University of Toronto grades, notification of Ph.D conferral from the University of London and miscellaneous academic related materials. It provides a valuable guide to Dr. Fox's professional activities and accomplishments. Also included are three portraits of Dr. Fox taken at various times throughout his career (1964-1984) and a cassette tape sound recording of his retirement dinner tribute, 26 March 1986.

Research materials

This series contains files relating to the production of Prof. Harney’s proposed book on “Italians in Canada”. It includes transcripts of interviews and other biographical information on identifiable individuals, notes, and some drafts documenting Italian Canadians in provinces across the country. It should be noted that some of the transcripts may be copies of records held at the Multicultural History Society of Ontario.

Other presentations and informal lectures

This series contains files documenting Prof. Richardson’s presentations generally outside the community of scholars associated with pure academic religious studies. As a recognized expert and scholar in his field, Prof. Richardson was frequently invited to speak to groups both inside and outside the University, in informal settings. Files in this series may contain manuscripts, notes, correspondence, programmes and other documents prepared for presentations to church groups like Temple Emanu-El and the Yorkminster Park Baptist Church, members of the general public, students, faculty, associations and others interested in historical or current topics relating to religion. Unlike Series 9 and 10, this series contains works not usually submitted for publication or other scholarly distribution. In addition, one will find some of his earliest presentations, mainly in the form of sermons, delivered while a student in divinity and campus minister at Knox College in the University of Toronto (see /034(01)-(06)).

Bank of England

The series consists of a book with typed notes of conversations, and both personal and business related incoming and outgoing correspondence written between 1935 and 1939, when Mr. Jackson was advisor to the Governors of the Bank of England. The series mainly consists of outgoing correspondence written by Mr. Jackson to family, friends, acquaintances, students, colleagues and committee members living within the United Kingdom, Canada, the United States, Jerusalem and Italy. Arranged chronologically, the correspondence deals with: the termination of Mr. Jackson’s teaching position at the University of Toronto; his position at the Bank of England; the activities, events and accomplishments of his family; his book An Economists confession of faith (1935); Mr. Jackson’s opinions and views of England at the time; the economic condition of Canada and England during the late 1930s; reflections on his work at the University of Toronto; the employment situation of his students, friends and acquaintances; and the development of the Economics department at the University of Toronto.

Accompanying the correspondence are two indexes (1937 and 1938), possibly created by Mr. Jackson’s secretary at the Bank of England. The indexes list the name of the person who sent the letter (in alphabetical order) with a number that was placed on the letter at the time it was received.

Mixed into the correspondence are articles, newspaper clippings, off-prints and speeches written by academics and consultants on various economic and financial issues within Canada and England. Sent to Mr. Jackson from family, friends, acquaintances, students and colleagues, the articles, newspaper clippings, off-prints and speeches are also arranged chronologically.

Manuscripts and publications

Professor Urban’s writings focus on the relationship between art and architectural design. Six of his publications are present in this series. Some of those that appeared before 1986 and all published afterward are absent. His earliest writing are based on his involvement with Networks Limited in Halifax, then on collaboration with New York City artist Brian Boigon, and finally on his research in Italy in the 1980s.

Professional associations and activities

This series documents membership on various professional and academic bodies, consulting and commercial work, participation on government committees and advisory boards, as well as his role as reviewer for programs or referee for grants or appointments.

Academic Lectures

Series consists of lectures delivered by McIlwraith while teaching at Cambridge University and the University of Toronto. Lectures cover a range of topics within anthropology and are directed to first-year students, third-year medical students, as well as including some graduate-level seminars.

Professional activities (other)

This series documents professional activities other than those described in the two previous series. Included is material on consulting and special projects, boards of governors of educational institutions that Professor Lang sat on, and his association with a number of other educational agencies and groups in Canada and elsewhere. Of the last, the most documentation is on the Ontario Council on University Affairs, the Premier’s Council for Economic Renewal, and the Sweden/Ontario Bilateral Exchange Seminar for Senior Academic Administrators (1982-1983). The arrangement in this section is by name of organization or event.

The files may contain any combination of correspondence, memoranda, minutes of meetings, notes, and reports.

Files from B2018-0001 include further records documenting Lang’s active involvement with the Board of Trustees of the Toronto School of Theology (2008 - ; Chair, Institutional Evaluations Committee, 2014-2017) and the Board of Governors of Saint Augustine’s Seminary. His work as Chair of the Strategic Asset Study Committee (2011-2014) for the Archdiocese of Toronto is also documented.

Student Notebooks

These are Prof. Lee’s notebooks from when he was a student. Many of his instructors are well known in the field of anthropology or worked with Lee during his career. For some of them, their records are also held by the University of Toronto. Instructors include: Ronald Cohen, Dr. C. D. Ellis, J.N. Emerson, Dr. Nathan Keyfitz, Dr. Thomas F. MacIlwraith, Cranford Pratt, Dr. James W. Vanstone, Dr. Fred W. Voget.

Research files

Over the years, Professor Skilling assembled a large number of research files which contained a great variety of material, including notes, correspondence, press clippings (especially from Czechoslovak, other Eastern European newspapers, and Canadian newspapers written in Czech), photocopies of articles, pamphlets, and books.

A selection of these research files has been retained in this series; the material not kept was turned over to members of the Skilling Seminar for their use. The files are grouped into several subject areas, following Professor Skilling’s arrangement and, for the most part, his file descriptions. The emphasis in selection was on original notes, heavily annotated items, correspondence, memoranda, drafts of papers and addresses, and material from conferences and seminars.

The first research area is on Czechoslovakia generally (1966-2000), with its files on the country’s political culture and political reform, political activists, and conferences [box 031]. The latter include the International Political Science Association roundtable in Zagreb in 1985, ‘Ten years after’ conference in Prague (1999), and the Forum 2000 conference in the same city. There is also material on the breakup of Czechoslovakia. Accompanying these files are two boxes [036, 037] of index card notes – one on Czech politics and one a bibliography of Czech politics.

The second category of files [boxes 033-034] consists of material gathered by Professor Skilling for his numerous writings about Tomas Masaryk, including his T. G. Masaryk: Against the current, published in English and Czech in 1994. The first part consists primarily of general writings about Masaryk, along with accompanying notes, correspondence, etc. The arrangement in the latter portion is by subject areas, of which the principal ones are: ‘the Slovak questions’, ‘the Jewish question’, ‘religion’, ‘the women’s question’ and ‘foreign policy’. Accompanying these files is a index card box of entries on Masaryk generally, on his writings, on works about him and on searches to be carried out [box 038, 038a and 038b].

The final category [box 035] relates to Vaclav Havel. In it is correspondence between him and Professor Skilling and copies of letters to Vilem Precan, along with files of interviews, addresses, and honours bestowed; Havel’s visits abroad (including the University of Toronto in 1990); his writings (with notes by Skilling), and material documenting his involvement with Charter 77.

Oversized material has been removed from /034(10) and (12) to /003(04), and from box 034(27) to box 003(05).

A poster has been removed from /035(23) to folder .(02).

Photoprints have been removed from /032(04) and (05) to box 009P(12).

Administrative files: "Dead files"

This series contains files relating to studies and other activities for mainly government agencies of the Ontario provincial government, and the Canadian federal government as well as the National Institutes of Health in the United States. Canadian government bodies include the Department of National Defence, Department of National Health, and the National Cancer Institute of Canada, to name a few. For Ontario, files concern the Ontario Cancer Institute/Princess Margaret Hospital, and the Ontario Council of Health.

Correspondence

This series contains correspondence from 1898-1950. Baillie was a professor of Marine Biology at the UofT. The correspondence in this series is mainly with family and friends while Baillie was stations in England during WWI, but also contains pre-war correspondence from Baillie to his parents, written while he was assigned to a marine biological station at St. Andrews, New Brunswick. There is also correspondence between Baillie and his son, while his son served overseas in WWII.

Audio Reels, Film Reels and Documentaries

Series consists of 78 audio reels, 8 film reels and 1 videocassette made during events given by l'Arche International. These reels are arranged chronologically whenever possible. The reels mostly feature Jean Vanier at various events, although other speakers are included. The events at which these were created are unknown, which is the reason these materials have been kept separate from the other series in this Collection.

Urban Studies Programme at Erindale College

This series consists of files pertaining to the development of an Urban Studies Programme at Erindale College. In particular, there are files relating to the curriculum for two courses: one addressing Urban Canada, and the other entitled ‘Concepts, Methods and Values in Urban Planning’. In addition there are files pertaining to the Urban Studies & Community Living programme at Innis College.

Diplomas and honours

This series includes Williams' university diplomas from the University of Western Ontario (B.A. and M.Sc.) and McGill University (Ph.D.) as well as awards such as Fellow of the Plastics Institute, Fellow of the Royal Institute of Chemistry and Professor Emeritus of the University of Toronto.

Teaching files

This series documents the courses taught by Prof. Nelson in the Department of History. Documents include course outlines, seminar topics, essay topics, exam questions, lecture schedules, reading lists and marks and comments on student work.

The main courses that Prof. Nelson taught were:

Hist 1620 The First World War: Origins, Course, Consequence
Hist 344 International Relations
Hist 443 Peacemakers and Peacemaking: The Quest for Peace 1814, 1919, 1945.

Research and research contract files

Dr. Glass kept a number of research files, which he arranged by subject, but most relate to research contracts with Canadian and American government agencies.

The general research files include lab books from the early 1950s, and correspondence, research proposals, notes, research data, and photoprints from 1950 to 1981. Dr. Glass provided titles such as "spherical shock tubes", "spherical explosions", and "sonic boom", the material on the last topic, in particular, being related to the research projects mentioned below. Dr. Glass also maintained files on the following granting agencies: the Canada Council, the National Research Council, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council, and the Connaught Research Fund at the University of Toronto.

The greatest volume of material in this series relates to research projects funded by government agencies. They are arranged by the name of the agency and by the contract(s) for each. The Canadian contracts were with AECL, Transport Canada, the Defence Research Establishment (Sheffield, Alberta), and Pratt and Whitney Canada. American contracts were with the Defence Nuclear Agency, NASA, and the research offices of the Air Force, Army and Navy. There are three research proposals, for which funding apparently was not granted, in this series, and two review reports for research projects by others.

Photographs of European trip

These photographs were taken by Acland during a trip to Europe in 1964 and document the architecture and landscape of various cities. These images would have been used for research and to illustrate several published works including a series of articles entitled “Building and Land:…” in Canadian Architect starting in 1968. Interior photographs of cathedrals and churches would have also formed the basis for his research on vaults, some of which were reproduced in his 1972 book Medieval Structure : The Gothic Vault.

Countries documented in this series include: Central European countries such as Czechoslovakia, Poland, Hungary; England; France; Greece; the Islamic Middle East such as Turkey, Iran and Egypt; Italy, Portugal, Spain and Yugoslavia. There are also photographs of Nigeria taken by a photographer Grant Wanzel. These are included here because they were originally filed with the European photographs.

Professional associations

This series relates to Prof. French’s involvement with various professional associations and funding bodies for a ten year period through the 1980s. Included are files on the National Research Council, the Royal Society, the Science Council of Canada, the Canadian Society for Chemistry as well as several others. Correspondence, memos, agenda, papers and notes usually document his role as an advisor, reviewer or participant at a conference or meeting. There is also a file on the Bell Canada Forum Award that Prof. French received in recognition for excellence in business-university research collaboration. Files are arranged chronologically.

Benson Family

This series contains assorted files relating to the Benson family in general and Dr. Benson’s parents in particular. Included are records relating to the family property in Port Hope, estate papers for her father Judge Thomas Benson, correspondence between Judge Benson and his second wife, Laura Fuller Benson (Clara Benson’s mother), account records for the management of the house and property in Port Hope.

B2010-0008 contains mainly family papers. Included are records relating to Clara Benson’s sister Emily C. Morris, including estate correspondence. Other members of the Morris family for which there are records: William Morris and Alexander Morris. Correspondence, wills, clippings and memorabilia also document Benson family members, particularly Thomas Bengley Benson, son of Thomas Moore Benson and Laura Fuller. Many of the records relate to his work as a naval architect and yacht broker as well as his estate of which Clara Benson was executor. Finally there are drawings and some financial records relating to the family home in Port Hope – Terralta.

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