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University of Toronto. Institute for Life Course and Aging fonds

  • UTA 0253
  • Fonds
  • 1980-2015

This fonds contains 1 accession of records from University of Toronto's Institute for Life Course and Aging. See accession-level description for more details.

University of Toronto. Institute for Life Course and Aging

University of Toronto. Institute for Life Course and Aging

This accession contains records dealing with the establishment of the Institute of Life Course and Aging and associated programs in Gerontology. It also contains publications and reference material that was co-produced, supported or housed by the Institute, such as Issues of an Aging Workforce, Elder Abuse Ontario and Canadian Aging Research Network (CARNET) material. Records also include Institue review files, audit reports, meeting minutes and strategic planning material. Also contains PhD Student records (1997-2009).

Wrong Family 2006 accession

Bound volume of "Report on the affairs of British North America from the Earl of Durham, Her Majesty's High Commissioner". House of Commons, 1839. With appendices A and B. Annotated and signed by "George M. Wrong 1897".

Wrong, George MacKinnon

Huntsman 1978 accession

Accession consists of correspondence, research notes, manuscripts, ca. 1600 sample fish scales, maps, articles, offprints, newspaper clippings dealing with Huntsman's research in fishing. Also includes publications, photoprints, photographic negatives, aerial photographs, scrapbooks and some slides.

Biographical and personal records

The series consists of biographical and personal records of Professor Bay. The material reflects his personal life, and includes press clippings, articles, and a thesis about him; personal documents such as educational records; documents of identification; personal papers related to life events (baptism, marriage, home ownership, inheritance, death certificates); calendars and a condolence scrapbook.

The arrangement of the material begins with biographical information (press clippings, biographies, curriculum vitae, referees, work about Bay), then personal papers, followed by what he termed “his personal collection”, consisting of items primarily in Norwegian relating to his family and Norway generally. The most intriguing portion of this “collection” is the folders of “illegal papers” [/002(28) – (30)] that Professor Bay buried when he hurriedly left Norway early in World War II and which he dug up sometime after he returned. There are also books about Norwegian resistance, and two books by his uncle.

Christian Bay fonds

  • UTA 1047
  • Fonds
  • 1938-1997

This accession documents Professor Bay’s personal and professional life. A little over half of the material consists of correspondence to and from Bay of a professional and personal nature. Some of the personal letters include frank opinions of situations in his professional life. Approximately half of the correspondence includes carbon copies and originals written by Bay. The principal years covered are the 1960s to the 1980s. There is also a great deal of material on the Norwegian resistance movement.

The addresses, publications and manuscripts form the second and third largest grouping of material. The latter consists of final copies, drafts, and correspondence related to tributes, letters to the editor, book reviews, as well as books, book chapters, and articles written by Bay from 1949 to 1987.

The remainder of the material consists of personal and biographical documents ( his “personal collections” include ‘illegal’ papers of the Norwegian resistance during World War II); annotated books and offprints sent to Bay; some of his teaching material at the following universities: Michigan State, the University of California Berkley, Stanford, Alberta, and Toronto; material related to his activities in professional associations such as the American Political Science Association and the Caucus for a New Political Science; photographs; and special media which mainly includes recordings of addresses.

This fonds also includes a small sous-fonds on the personal and professional life of his wife, Juanita Bay.

Bay, Christian

Academia and teaching materials

This series documents some of Professor Bay’s academic and associated activities. It includes teaching material (reading lists, syllabi, lectures, and exams) and his work within academia (committee work, appraisals and references, and departmental involvement) at the various universities where he taught. The files on “referees and appraisals” at the University of Toronto include references for academics and students and comments on books and articles forwarded to him for his input. Also included are files on the proposal to abolish the death penalty in California and, in particular, the attempt to stop the execution of convicted murderer and rapist, Caryl Chessman; and copies of "Key List Mailing: Selected Documents of Current and Lasting Interest in the Civil Rights Movement", a biweekly publication produced by the San Francisco Regional Office of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).

Additional material related to academia and teaching material may be located in the correspondence series. Material related to his research in addresses and publications is located in the publications series. Material related to his involvement in professional associations can be found in the professional association series.

Published works

Series consists of published works written and collected by Nouwen during his lifetime. Although there are some of his earliest writings dating from 1956, the series is predominantly dating from 1970 to 1996.

The series has been arranged in the following ten sub-series taking into account the author(s), subject(s), and format of the records:

1.9.1. Articles by Nouwen
1.9.2. Articles co-authored by Nouwen
1.9.3. Interviews of and articles about Nouwen
1.9.4. Book reviews
1.9.5. Scrapbook 1956-1965
1.9.6. Scrapbook 1965-1982
1.9.7. Books by Nouwen
1.9.8. Books contributed to by Nouwen
1.9.9. Books about Nouwen
1.9.10. Guides

A more detailed description of each sub-series, as well as each subseries arrangement can be found in the sub-series descriptions.

Professional associations and posts

The records in this series document Professor Helleiner’s association with and involvement in several dozen professional associations and organizations, including consulting contracts with governments and educational bodies. There are also files on many of the journals with which he was associated (he sat on the editorial boards of more than twenty at one time or another, one (World Development) for more than thirty years. Most of the latter contain his comments on papers he was asked to assess. There are also files on some conferences that he attended.

The files contain correspondence, memoranda, notes, minutes of meetings and proceedings of workshops, reports (many written by Helleiner), conference programmes and papers, the occasional interview, and selected newsletters and press clippings. The arrangement is by name of organization or event, filed alphabetically.

The most extensive files are on the following organizations, the binding thread being development economics: African Capacity Building Foundation and the African Economic Research Consortium; with officials and politicians of the Government of Canada and about the Canadian International Development Agency; the Commonwealth Secretariat, the International Development Research Centre (IDRC), and International Lawyers and Economists Against Poverty (ILEAP); the North South Institute, the Overseas Development Council (USA), and the North South Roundtable of the Society for International Development (UK); various activities relating to trade and investment in South Africa (including early opposition to it), and ongoing activities in Tanzania (see below); numerous bodies associated with the United Nations (especially UNICEF and UNCTAD); several universities (Dar es Salaam, Sussex, and the West Indies); the World Bank, and World Development.

The International Development Research Centre (IDRC), founded in Ottawa in 1970, was mandated to support research on the reduction of global poverty and particularly research in (as well as for) developing countries.” It was initially headed by David Hopper, with whom Professor Helleiner worked on the creation of the North-South Institute in 1975-1976. He sat on the Board of the IDRC from 1985 to 1991.

ILEAP grew out of concerns Professor Helleiner raised in his Prebisch lecture at UNCTAD in December, 2000 about the lack of lawyers (and economists) “committed…to the specially defence of the rights of the poorest in the global economy’s legal system and the building of their capacity of defend themselves.” His call was taken up by Ron Daniels, dean of Law at the U of T, and others, with initial funding from the IDRC.

Professor Helleiner’s long association with Tanzania is well documented here, beginning in 1978 with the Government of Tanzania Task Force on Export Incentive Schemes, followed by the Tanzania Advisory Group (“Three Wise Men”) in 1981 and ending,
between 1994 and 2000, with the Group of Independent Advisors on Development Cooperation Issues Between Tanzania and its Aid Donors (which Helleiner chaired) and the associated Tanzania Advisory Strategy.

Additional correspondence on many of these organizations may be found filed under the names of the individual members in Series 2: Correspondence, an example being Roy Culpepper of the North-South Institute.

Of the more than twenty editorial boards on which Professor Helleiner sat, the most extensive files are for International Organization and WorldDevelopment. The files together contain primarily specially ng relating to his membership on editorial boards and/or his appraisals of papers presented to the respective journals. Some related correspondence may be found in ‘Series 2: Correspondence’ under the names of editorial board members.

Professor Helleiner’s involvement with the Intergovernmental Group of Twenty-four on International Monetary Affairs (Group of 24 or G-24) is documented in Series 7 and with WIDER (World Institute for Development Economic Research) in Series 6.

In his curriculum vitae [B2010-0005/001(01) and /019(05)], Professor Helleiner provides lists of “Journal editorial boards”, “Other professional honours and posts”, and “sample selected research contracts and consultancies”. Researchers will find these lists very useful in gaining an understanding of the breadth of Professor Helleiner’s professional activities, while some indication of the depth of his involvement can be gleaned from his memoirs, Listening and learning [B2010-0005/079(02)].

World Institute for Development Economics Research (WIDER)

In 1984 the director of the World Institute for Development Economics Research (WIDER), newly established by the United Nations University (UNU) and based in Helsinki, invited scholars, of whom Professor Helleiner was one, to organize interesting research projects using WIDER’s funds and under its auspices. The following year, Helleiner, along with Lance Taylor and others, began to develop a research programme on international economic issues and helped organize a high level conference to flesh out its direction. The programme that emerged involved papers on 18 developing countries, the summary volume of which appeared in 1988.

By 1990, Professor Helleiner had assembled a number of developing country authors and empirically-oriented trade/development analysts to work out a research project on trade and industrialization policies. It produced two books which he edited and for which he wrote the introductions. The first, on trade and industrialization reconsidered, appeared as Trade policy and industrialization in turbulent times in 1994. Papers presented at the WIDER conferences on ‘trade and industrialization’ held in Ottawa in September 1991 and on ‘Trade and industrialization reconsidered’ held in Paris in August the same year formed the basis of this volume. Papers on Nigeria, Pakistan and Zimbabwe were not received in time for inclusion in it. A second, shorter volume, containing only five country studies but built on the work of the first, appeared in 1995 as Manufacturing for export in the developing world: problems and possibilities.

A second WIDER project, on new trade theories and industrialization in the developing countries, was begun in 1988 and published as Trade policy, industrialization and development: new perspectives in 1992.

The third project, on non-traditional exporting from Africa, focused on the following countries: Burkino Fasso, Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana, Kenya., Mauritius, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda and Zimbabwe, with comparative studies on Chile and Costa Rica. Professor Helleiner worked closely with the African Economic Research Consortium’s (AERC) trade liberalization project and with the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD). The project began in July 1996 and ran until late 1999. Papers were presented at a joint UNU/WIDER meeting in Kampala, Uganda, in June 1997 and they were subsequently reworked into chapters for the book, Non-traditional export promotion in Africa: experience and issues, which appeared in 2002. The series ends with a proposed project on the United Nations and the Breton Woods Institutions.

This series contains correspondence, memoranda, notes, minutes of meetings, conference material, drafts of papers, reports and publications.

Manuscripts and publications

Professor Helleiner is the author or editor of 18 books, over 100 refereed articles and contributions to volumes, even more non-refereed publications, many book reviews, and some letters to the editor. This series does not contain a complete record of his output or copies of all of his manuscripts. Some files may contain a comprehensive record of the writing of a particular piece, including correspondence with colleagues (Professor Helleiner habitually ran his drafts by them) and/or publishers, contracts, notes and notebooks, drafts of manuscripts and comments on them, offprints, reviews, and royalty statements. Others may contain only the contract, perhaps a letter or two, or a review, but no manuscripts or offprints.

Some of Professor Helleiner's writing have been translated into other languages, including French, Italian, Japanese, Norwegian, Spanish, and Swedish.

For the three WIDER volumes that Professor Helleiner edited and for which he wrote introductions and/or chapters, see Series 6.

Delhi Durbars Collection

  • CA OTUTF MS COLL 00075 2B Annex
  • Manuscript Collection
  • 1903-1911

Official directories of the Coronation Durbars of 1903 and 1911. The collection also includes printed invitations and tickets for various state functions.

Ken Koyama Papers

  • CA OTUTF MS COLL 00670
  • Manuscript Collection
  • 1987-1992

Small collection of printed material regarding Japanese Canadian immigrants after WWII .

Koyama, Ken

A critical analysis

This item consists of a 4 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled ‘A Critical Analysis’ published in Ave Maria National Catholic Weekly, 3 June 1967, p. 11-13, 30. Nouwen discusses the rise and popularity of the Pentecostal movement at Notre Dame University in Indiana and states that the article ‘is an attempt to clarify certain issues and to be of some help in an honest evaluation’. Nouwen looks at the phenomenon from three perspectives: 1) A Historical Perspective: He writes of the past and current religious atmosphere at Notre Dame. Here he credits an article by Killian McDonnell. O.S.B. (The Ecumenical Significance of the Pentecostal Movement) where there is a discussion of the ‘sobriety’ and ‘objectivity’ of Roman Catholic liturgy in contrast to the more emotional freedom and sense of belonging in the Pentecostal services. Nouwen suggests that this latter may answer a need in the new more ambitious and competitive atmosphere at the university. 2) A Psychological Perspective. Here Nouwen asks how we can evaluate this new movement by asking several questions: Does it heal or hurt? He suggests that evidence leads to a conclusion that while there may be a short term benefit ‘it is very doubtful that it will cure deep mental suffering’. He also asks ‘Can it be dangerous’? He states that ‘for those who are not prepared every inducement of a strong emotion can break and do serious harm. He also suggests that for those who do not receive the ‘gifts’ such as tongues or joy there then may be the question ‘what is wrong with me’. This leads to the need for direction, guidance and care. Finally he asks: Does it create community? Nouwen suggests that the powerful emotions of belonging and sharing, may risk creating a community that is inward and elitist. ‘the Pentecostal movement creates a situation of oneness and togetherness, which makes the community highly self-centered and hinders the development of the autonomous Christian…’. 3) A Theological Perspective: here Nouwen is asking if the Pentecostal movement is reflecting the theological developments of Vatican II and suggests that it may not meet the new stress on incarnational theology. He concludes the article by stating: ‘the new wave of Pentecostalism at Notre Dame University obviously answers a burning need in many students. It worries many who are concerned about the effects on the mental health of some…It places heavy responsibility on the leaders of the movement, and it disturbs many theologians’ but it also offers a chance to come to a new realization of the crucial importance of the valid religious experience – as an authentic part of the Christian life’.

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