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Education

In the fall of 1960 Frederic Urban entered Merrimack College, a private Roman Catholic institution in North Andover, Massachusetts. In the summer of 1961, he studied Latin at Glastonbury Abbey, a Benedictine abbey in Hingham, Massachusetts, and that autumn entered the Augustinian Good Counsel Novitiate in New Hamburg, New York as a novice monk. In the fall of 1962 he returned to his studies at Merrimack, from which he received an AB (Humanities) in 1964. His other degrees were an MA in literature from Boston College in 1970, a Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) from the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (NSCAD) in 1978, followed by an independent study program at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1978-1979. This series documents his studies at the last two institutions. The arrangement is by name of institution.

The files relating to Urban’s studies at NSCAD and the Whitney Museum include his applications, covering correspondence, and material relating to courses taken. There are also a number of slides documenting his time at both institutions. Material on exhibitions and performance pieces done while a student is filed with Series 6. While at the Whitney, one of Frederic’s friends, Colin Lee, had an artwork published in a San Francisco Chinese newspaper. The series ends with a file on the Whitney Museum of American Art Independent Study Program Alumni Association.

Correspondence

This series begins with two files of general personal and professional correspondence, followed by files of correspondence with individuals and organizations, arranged alphabetically. The latter document principally Urban’s professional interests, including donations of copies of some of his portfolios to archival repositories, and with artists such as Brian Boignon, who hand-illustrated his correspondence and with whom Urban co-authored an article, and about Mrozinski, a New York musician and performance artist (with accompanying photographs and slides from a performance in 1978). Included also are letters from E. A. (Betty) Murray while vacationing in Italy in 1973.

Personal and biographical

The biographical information in this series is provided largely by several versions of Frederic Urban’s curriculum vitae. The other files contain a notebook (1975-1977) primarily on life in Boston and Halifax, a wall calendar (1981), greeting cards from his partner, Larry Richards, and others, design elements for a garden at Urban and Richards’ penthouse in Etobicoke, and material from a trip to Columbia at Christmas, 1976. Accompanying this textual material are two files of slides, one of “Danny, Halifax”, and the other “Studies for Natchitoches”, Urban and Richards’ property in Louisiana.

Professor Urban has always had a great interest in history, American politics and the presidency; the passion for politics he shared with his partner, Larry. In the late 1960s they both took part in demonstrations on the Boston Common against the Vietnam War; a poster by the Vietnam Moratorium Committee is a memento of that struggle. Another from that era is a special issue of Life (5 July 1968) on the Presidency.

Photographs

As a long time professor in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering, L. E. Jones photographed and collected images of many Faculty and campus events including convocations, memorials, award ceremonies, retirements and open houses. Of particular notice are images of: the Engineering Centenary celebrations in 1973: the mounting of the lintel from the Old S.P.S. building and the installation of Becca's H in front of the Galbraith building; the fire, rebuilding and reopening of the Sandford Flemming building, 1977-1982; the excavation of the site of the Old Magnetic Observatory, 1979; the design, construction and installation of the Sundial, 1993.

As Engineering Archivist, Jones also collected many historical images documenting the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering as well as its predessor the School of Practical Science. Included in this collection are portraits of faculty and students groups, images of student activities, buildings, Gull Lake Survey Camp and Ajax Campus. These photographs mainly document the first half of the 20th century.

Manuscripts and off-prints

This series consists of articles, memoranda, reports, speeches, lectures, pamphlets, off-prints and books written by Mr. Jackson over a forty year span. Within the series, a “wordage of memoranda” written by Mr. Jackson illustrating the numbers of terms utilized within articles written from 1940 to 1946 is also provided.

Documenting Mr. Jackson’s career, thought, views and influences in Canadian economics, the manuscripts document his work in: international exchange; Canada’s economic prospect and stance on trade; the economic conditions of countries such as the United States and the United Kingdom; the effects of the war(s) on Canada’s financial situation; the population and employment opportunities; unemployment; textiles and other merchandise; capitalism; conditions affecting interest rates; inflation; and the great depression.

Personal

The series consists of records documenting Gilbert Edward Jackson’s family life and professional career, from the early 1920s to his death in 1959. Arranged alphabetically by function, the files of the series include: typed autobiographical notes illustrating Mr. Jackson’s life from the day he was born until 1919, prior to his emigration to Toronto; two biographical sketches highlighting key moments within Mr. Jackson’s personal and professional career; typed and handwritten incoming and outgoing correspondence from family members, friends, colleagues and acquaintances regarding the death of his son, John Denison Jackson (1944), Mrs. Maria Elizabeth Jackson’s estate (1952-1953), notes of thanks for reference letters, gifts and lunch meetings, personal regards for his family, and an unsigned letter to Misses Jackson, Mr. Jackson’s sisters regarding the economist’s declining health (1959); a handwritten copy of Mr. Jackson’s obituary (1959); and a photograph of a portrait of Mr. Jackson (B2004-0019/001P). Within the files of correspondence, the letters are arranged chronologically, except for those offering condolences to Mr. Jackson for the loss of his son which are arranged alphabetically by the last-name of the sender.

The series also consists of several files of press clippings about Mr. Jackson’s personal life, career moves, thoughts, views, as well as Canada’s economic stance on various issues. The subject matter of the newspaper clippings include: France and Germany’s economic situation after World War I; Canada’s immigration policies (1923), tariff fallacies and taxation system (ca. 1935); unemployment insurance within Canada; the analogous trading problems with England (1934); Mr. Jackson’s speech on overcoming the depression and difficulties through the improvement of the human character before the Empire Club in the Royal York Hotel (1933) and Canadian Club in Ottawa (1934); being appointed Economic Adviser to the Governors of the Bank of England (1935); the selling of Mr. Jackson’s house in Toronto prior to leaving for England (1935); the return of economic liberalism to Canada; the doctrine of free trade; and reviews about Mr. Jackson’s book An economist’s confession of faith (1935). Letters to the editor can also be found within the press clippings regarding similar themes. Arranged chronologically within their individual files, the press clippings, which are from newspapers across Canada and England, were possibly collected by Mr. Jackson.

Personal and education

This series consists of records such as her curriculum vitae, her association with the Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing, personal documents such as register of birth, certificates and diplomas relating to her nursing education at the University of Toronto, and her association as an elder with St. Andrews Presbyterian Church, Owen Sound. Records relating to her education also include her personal scrapbook of photographs, clippings, correspondence and other documents recording her years as a student of nursing in the diploma programme at the University of Toronto. This series also contains a file relating to her Honorary Doctorate in Nursing Science from the University of Turku in Finland in 1993.

In addition to photographs in the scrapbook, portrait photographs of Prof. Jones as a graduate in nursing in 1950, as Dean (ca 1979-1988) and informal photographs of the honorary degree ceremony at University of Turku will be found in /001P.

Sri Lanka

Prof. Cameron joined the Board of the Forum of Federations in 2002. His work with the Forum led him to provide technical support to the Sri Lankan Peace Process, which was seeking resolution to the dispute between the Sri Lankan government and the Tamil Tigers. Prof. Cameron participated in peace process meetings in Sri Lanka (26-30 April 2002, 30 August-5 September 2002) Sri Lanka/Oslo (25 November-5 December), London (22-23 December), Thailand (3-10 January 2003), Berlin (5-9 February 2003), and Sri Lanka/Tokyo (10-20 March 2003; 24 August-3 September 2004; 26 March-7 April 2005). He also wrote papers and delivered presentations on peace and governance in Sri Lanka.

Records in this series include correspondence, reports, research, proposals from the Tamil Tigers and Sri Lankan government, and articles and presentations on the peace process. Records from particular peace talks include press releases, debriefing comments, texts of speeches, correspondence, maps and other travel documents, news clippings, and notes.

Series also consists of 2 photographs of Prof. Cameron, taken on his travels.

Coins

Prof. Heichelheim also became well known as a numismatist. After leaving Germany in 1933, he worked for the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge cataloguing the General and Leake coin collections and preparing a series of catalogues for publication over the next two decades (ca 1937-1950). This series contains drafts of these catalogues (Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum IV (Parts 1-5), photographs of the coins reproduced in the catalogues, correspondence, notes, as well as a report on the Department of Coins and Medals at the Fitzwilliam Museum (ca 1942). There are also two files on the Giessen coin collection and two files which may contain drafts of articles (in German).

Manuscripts: book reviews and articles

This series contains drafts of some of Heichelheim’s manuscripts for published and unpublished articles and books reviews. Among these works is a series of files of manuscripts and correspondence relating to articles submitted to the Oxford Classical Dictionary on Celtic gods, ancient economic history etc. 1938-1939.

Correspondence

Prof. Heichelheim maintained a regular correspondence with friends, family and colleagues both in Canada and around the world up to the year of his death. His brother’s name was Arthur Heichelheim and he lived in London England. This series dominates this fonds and includes correspondence with classical scholars at Cambridge and Oxford and at the University of Giessen (Prof. Heichelheim’s former employer), as well as at the University of Toronto. Such scholars include many of his co-authors such as E.N. Adler, Prof. F. L. Griffith, J. G. Tait, T. Frank, H. Michel, Prof. Elemer Balogh and Prof. Cedric Yeo. Correspondence is in English or German, depending on the nationality of the correspondent.

During World War II he continued to maintain ongoing correspondence with his brother and other family members, along with other scholars left in Europe and frequently describe living conditions, lost friends, the death camps and establishment of a Jewish state in Palestine. Correspondence with family and friends is often in German.

Works of art

This series consists of two signed water colours, samples of a larger collection still in the position of his family. Both pictures are scenes near his cottage on Garden Island in the St. Lawrence River between Wolfe Island and the City of Kingston. The watercolour of the sailboat “The Curlew” was painted in a harbour near the cottage of his former student , friend and colleague, Donald Swainson, professor of history at Queen’s University in 1984. The snow scene is a view of his son walking from the cottage in the winter of 1990. This was the one and only occasion that Prof. McNaught agreed to visit the cottage in the winter.

Correspondence

Series consists of Laurel MacDowell's correspondence which primarily documents MacDowell's professional activities within universities (the majority of the records pertain to the University of Toronto, however there is also correspondence regarding York and McMaster universities as well). The correspondence documents other aspects of MacDowell's life as well, such as her role as editor of the Ontario History journal and as a publishing academic. Additional correspondence can be found throughout other series within this accession as they pertain directly to the content of those files.

Professional activities

This series documents Prof MacDowell's involvement in organizations and associations—primarily those focused on labour relations and the environment. These include the Policy Committee of the Ontario NDP, the Nuclear International Research Group, and the Ontario Historical Society. Also documented here is MacDowell's involvement with the Larry Sefton Memorial Lecture series, for which she delivered the ten year anniversary lecture in 1992. Other conferences attended and presented at are also captured here, including the 1986 North American Labour History conference held at the University of Toronto, which MacDowell organized and which was the only time this conference had been hosted in Canada. This series also includes documentation of roles performed by Prof MacDowell in addition to her regular duties as a professor. These include the 1995 delivery of the citation for the honorary doctorate degree awarded to Lynn Williams; serving as chair of the Canadian History Search Committee (2000); participating in performance reviews; and lectures delivered to classes other than her own.

Early education and biographical

This series consists of records pertaining to the education and career of Prof MacDowell. It includes academic work (notes and papers) produced while MacDowell was an undergraduate and graduate student. The series also documents her tenure and promotion at the University of Toronto, annual activity reports, internal memos at U of T, and other activities related directly to her career at U of T.

Graphic

Photographs and portraits document many of Dr. Evans professional activities and milestones in his career. They show him receiving awards, at meetings and conferences, in groups at ceremonies. There are also some family photos and photographs of his trips to China and Nepal.

Negative and Contact sheets

Series B: Negatives and Contact Sheets contains all of the negatives and contact sheets that were housed in binders in the office of Ken Jones. The binders were arranged by year and usually labelled with the year and the sequential number of each negative sheet and corresponding contact sheet, i.e. Binder 1968 (now file 2012-001B-2:2) contains negatives 181-225.

Legacy databases called “David’s database” and “Photomatica” document the subjects associated with each contact sheet. Contact the archivist to access an emulation of these databases and search through them. All subject keywords recorded on the photographs are also transcribed in each file’s “Media/Content Notes” field.

Covers of the original binders have been photocopied and stored in a file with the corresponding photographs.

Slides

Series A: Slides contains all of the slides that were housed in binders in the office of Ken Jones. Binders were arranged by subject and, with the exception of a few, labelled numerically from 1-28.

*Note that some slides contain an abbreviated subject label; see below for the “subject key”.

Slides Subject Key
ADM = Administration
AST = Astronomy
BIO = Biology
CH = Chemistry
CON = Construction
COUN = Counselling
CUL = Cultural/Clubs, etc.
DRA = Drama
EXT = Exterior Architecture
FA = Fine Art
FR = Front Entrance
FT = Field Trips
G = Gallery
GEO = Geology and Earth Sciences
GRAD = Graduation (convocation)
HUM = Humanities
INT = Interior Architecture
LI = Library
Lit = Literary
MUS = Music
OR = Orientation
PHY = Physics
PR or MLH = Miller Lash House/Principal’s Resident
REC = Rec Centre
RES = Resident
S/EXT = Students outside
SC = Summer Camp
V = Valley
VILL = Village Centre

Covers of the original binders have been photocopied and stored in a file with the corresponding photographs.

Research files

These files consist of correspondence, notes, photographs and negatives, articles used for research, and drafts of manuscripts relating to Professor Rouillard's ongoing research about the Turks in French history, thought, and literature.

Photographs and negatives

Series consists mainly copy prints collected of historical photographs of the Physics department. Most were in an album and page numbers are indicated on the folders. Some originals are included.

Professional organizations

This small series encompasses three professional organizations with which Professor Barbour was involved. There is a slim folder of correspondence from when he was editor of the Canadian Mathematical Bulletin, and extensive files on the Gelfand Club of Ontario, a correspondence program founded in 1969 by Professor Israel Halperin of the University of Toronto “to provide resource material for able secondary school students interested in mathematics and to encourage them to correspond with mathematicians.” Professor Barbeau took over the program in January 1970 and ran it until October, 1978. The files contain notes, problem sets, and answers.

There are also three slim files on his involvement with the Mathematical Association of America, including its joint meeting in Toronto in 1976 and short courses Professor Barbeau offered for it in 1991 and 1993.

Photographs

As an engineering student at the University of Toronto, D. F. McCarthy was involved in a number of activities including water polo, and as a member, 4th year Executive of Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering. Included are photographs water polo teams, graduation photos for high school and university, class photographs, as a professional engineer with the City of Toronto and as an alumnus of U of T., including the Chancellor’s Circle (1994) and Arbor Award (1993). Also included is sketch by Owen Staples of “Memorial Tower University of Toronto” ca 1930.

Correspondence and biographical

Consists of correspondence with colleagues, publishers, and his wife. Also includes a framed letter from Duncan Campbell Scott, 2 annotated books, educational diplomas and certificates, memoirs, scrapbooks, graduation robes, and various medals.

Reports, articles, papers

Dr. Pimlott wrote many articles, reports and papers as a graduate student, employee of the Newfoundland government (1950-1957) and Ontario Government's Department of Lands and Forests (1958-1962), and as professor of zoology at the University of Toronto (1962-1978). This series contains a wide variety of these writings covering his early studies of moose (later used for his doctoral theses entitled "Reproduction productivity and harvests of Newfoundland Moose", 1958) and wolves to his later work as environmentalist. Files include correspondence, draft manuscripts, reports, and offprints.

Photographs

Series consists of photograph collections of N.J. Turnbull. There are twelve albums containing 432 photographs of the Royal Commission on Forestry relating to Newfoundland and Labrador in 1954. There are also two photo albums containing approximately 600 photographs in total that focus on Kukatush, Kapuskasing, Spring Camp, Smoky Line, Groundhog River Drive, and St. Williams, ranging in date from 1946 – 1953. In addition to the photo albums, there are also 8 loose photographs. Six of these were found in Album 2 [B2014-0018/003P(01)] and two from N.J. Turnbull’s Daily Journal [B2014-0018/003(04)]. The majority of the photographs have descriptions and identifications on the verso.

John Fulton Turnbull: Logging reports

Included in the N.J. Turnbull collection are seven logging reports produced by his father, J.F. Turnbull. The majority of the reports are the Annual Report of the Forester of the North Bay District (1923-1929) during his time as district forester there. There are several photographs that are included within the reports that have not been removed or catalogued, but pertain to the content of the report. The final item – a Certificate of Life Membership to the Ontario Professional Foresters Association – is oversized and therefore stored in a separate location.

Turnbull, John Fulton

Speeches and public talks

Consists of drafts and final versions of speeches and public talks, conference programmes and attendee lists, rough notes, related correspondence, secondary sources including newspaper clippings, and workshop materials related to speeches and public talks given by Eichler throughout her career.

Scrapbooks (microfilm copies)

This series consists of 10 negative microfilm reels of Robert S. Gill's personal scrapbooks which he loaned to the Metropolitan Toronto Reference Library (Theatre Dept) for microfilming. He retained the originals after the project was completed

Personal

Contains personal correspondence mainly documenting Hollander’s achievements including many congratulatory notes from colleagues regarding awards or the publication of his major works.

Correspondence and related documents also document his appointment as University Professor and the campaign beginning in 1991 to procure for him a Nobel Prize in Economics. Also documented are his appointments through the University ranks, his salary, and the awarding of grants to support his research including activity reports and grant applications.

This series also contains records collected by Hollander over his academic and professional career, and includes various graduate school lecture notes, school transcripts, honorary degrees, and a heavily annotated copy of David Ricardo’s book Principles of Political Economy which he kept separate from other professional and academic papers.

Filed at the beginning of each accession is his most updated C.V. at the time the records were acquired (see B1998-0027/001(1) and B2012-0018/001(1)). There is also a portrait of Hollander, to be found in B1998-0027/001P.

Scholarly papers

In addition to published works, Prof. Richardson made numerous presentations at conferences, symposia, invited lectures, memorials, convocations, and other occasions. The papers contained in this series were, for the most part, prepared for academic and other scholarly activities such as meetings of associations like the Society for Biblical Literature, Canadian Society of Biblical Studies, Canadian Society for the Study of Religion and the SNTS and represent a significant portion of Prof. Richardson’s body of work. Other presentations were made at many Canadian universities as invited lecturer and to various groups at the University of Toronto. A few files contain papers submitted, but never published. Indeed, many of these presentations are on topics that formed the basis of future publications. Researchers are therefore referred to Series 10 for topics of written works not represented in this series.

Files may contain correspondence, manuscripts, and notes.

National Research Council

Series contains is composed of records dating from McKay’s time at the National Research Council. During the Second World War, the organization was mobilized to support the Allied war effort. As a result, most of the series’ records relate to military research and development. Canadian Army Operational Research Group (C.A.O.R.G.) reports compose approximately half the files that make up the series. These reports cover subjects ranging from blast measurements for anti-tank mine clearance to the number and distribution of Japanese paper balloons in North America. There are also two summary reports on Japanese balloon incidents.
The remainder of the textual and graphic records are made up of committee minutes, general Department of Defence documents, and a short paper on Canada’s part in the development of the radio proximity fuse, which McKay contributed to as assistant to project leader Professor Arnold Pitt.

Also included in this series are the remains of a Japanese paper balloon. Paper balloons, also known as balloon bombs, were a by-product of an atmospheric experiment by Axis scientists, which discovered a powerful air current traveling across the Pacific at about 30,000 feet [1]. Taking advantage of this knowledge, the Japanese military developed what may well have been the first intercontinental weapon in the form of explosive devices attached to paper balloons. These balloons were released in Japan and carried along the Pacific by a jet stream, ultimately finding their way to North America’s West Coast. Although the Japanese are thought to have released as many as 9,000 paper balloons, only 1,000 or so are thought to have reached North America, resulting in a total of six casualties [2].

NOTES

  1. Johnna Rizzo, “Japan’s secret WWII weapon: Balloon bombs,” National Geographic, 27 May 2013.
  2. Ibid.
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