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University of Toronto Archives and Records Management Services Series
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Correspondence

This series includes some professional correspondence but much of it consists of letters to and from Dr. Hastings’ parents, his grandmother, his aunts, Bessie Ferguson, Betty Graham and Louise Hastings, and other relatives and friends met over a lifetime of public service and devotion to his church. The last influenced many of his interests outside his academic and administrative work at University of Toronto, and is reflected in thirty years of correspondence arising from visits to India and Japan beginning in the early 1950s.

While most of the correspondence is filed chronologically, the first files contain exchanges of letters with the Drever family (especially Michael Drever), the politician Eugene Forsey, and the relatives mentioned above. Dr. Hastings met the Drevers from Montevideo, Uruguay, in 1959, when he went on a tour of Latin America to observe preventive medicine and public health teaching. He was to return to Uruguay at the end of 1964 as a member of the World Health Organization/Pan American Health Organization program on health planning in Latin America that also entailed visits to Chile and Argentina (he had a regular correspondent from Santiago after that date).

Dr. Hastings first went to India in 1953 as the University of Toronto’s representative to the World University Service International Seminar (the files for which are in Series 5). While there he first visited the Christian Medical College and Hospital in Vellore, near Madras, that received support from the Canadian Council of Churches through its Vellore/Ludhiana Committee, of which he was a member from 1962 to 1975 and to which he was an advisor from 1975 to 1981. Over the years Dr. Hasting was to provide financial support to many young people he met in India, helping some with their education overseas and others to immigrate to Canada. In 1955 he had the opportunity to go abroad again, this time as a faculty member of the WUS International Seminar, Japan, followed by a month for studying medical education and medical care in that country. He wrote a widely praised report on his return, and kept up a voluminous correspondence with many of the people he had met. In later years Dr. Hastings came to regard these two visits as seminal events in his life.

The first files of chronological correspondence is primarily with his parents, consisting largely of letters sent and received while at Camp Kagawong on Balsam Lake near Fenelon Falls, Ontario where Hastings was to spend many summers from about 1937 and where he was sometime counsellor and a director. (Correspondence from his vacation trips to Quebec in 1943 and 1946 is filed in Series 1). From 1953 and his visit to India, the chronological arrangement is divided in each year into the following categories: general, parents (later ‘mother’, India and (from 1955) Japan.

The volume of correspondence tails off in the mid-1970s; one file covers the years 1986-1997.

Other activities

The records in this series underscore the impact of an upbringing where the tenets of Christianity, public service, and duty were emphasized. They begin with thirty years (1937-1969) of files on Camp Kagawong, a privately owned boy’s camp on Balsam Lake, where Dr. Hastings spent his summers as a young boy enjoying the outdoors. The leadership qualities he displayed led to his becoming a camp counsellor (1944-1945) and, from 1946-1950, director of the Bantam Section and instructor in nature, first aid, swimming and games. During those years he dramatized three folk tales for presentation. At the weekly chapel services, he often delivered homilies or ‘sermonettes’, a practice he continued throughout his association with the camp that closed in 1975. Dr. Hastings’ activities at Camp Kagawong are well documented through notes, certificates, correspondence (much of which is in Series 3) scripts for theatrical presentations, chapel service programs and sermonettes, and some of the annual camp catalogues, photographs and artifacts. The arrangement of the files is largely chronological.

The material on Camp Kagawong is followed by files on Canadian Council of Churches and its Vellore/Ludhiana Committee, of which Dr. Hastings was a member from 1962-1975 and to which he was an advisor from 1975 to 1981. These are followed by files on the Christian Medical College in Vellore, India, including extensive ones documenting the work of the international review team that visited Vellore in 1979 and produced a report on its findings in 1980.

Next are files on the coronation of Queen Elizabeth in 1953; the Developing Countries Farm Radio Network, of which Dr. Hastings was a member of the board; Emmanuel College, where he was a University representative on its council and a member of its curriculum committee; the King’s College Fund which in 1985 organized a Canadian study tour of health services in Britain; and on Pickering College in Newmarket, Ontario. A member of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada, Dr. Hastings was active in its youth clubs in the 1940s. He attended the 1948 convention at which George Drew was selected leader and took part in the federal election the following year.

Dr. Hastings’ place of worship for many years was St. Andrew’s United Church at 117 Bloor Street East in Toronto. He played a very active role in its affairs, serving on its board, many of its committees, was a member of its Men’s Club and, on occasion, delivered the sermon of the week. The files cover the years from 1952 to 1973, when St. Andrew’s and the Yonge Street United Church amalgamated and include correspondence, notices of services, minutes of meetings, reports, and drafts of three sermons.

This series ends with a number of files on Dr. Hastings’ involvement in several activities of the United Church of Canada, centring around his being a member of its task force on health services (1985-1987) and its Division of Mission in Canada’s health task group (1991-1994). Included are correspondence, minutes, memoranda, notes, drafts of reports, and a video, “Taking the pulse of Canadian health care” that grew out of the work of the health task group.

Publications

Dr. Hastings’ first documented publications were a book review and a play that are filed with in Series 3 with his University of Toronto Schools material. This series encompasses his writings from the mid-1950s when he was beginning to establish himself professionally. Not all of his writings appear here but included are manuscripts both published and unpublished, some with several drafts. There is also occasional background material, covering correspondence,
some printed versions of manuscripts, reviews and commentary. Not every title is specifically referred to in the following commentary. Files are arranged by title and filed chronologically, except for the first two that consist of letters to the editor and book reviews.

Dr. Hastings’ research and writings broadly focus on issues in the Canadian public health care system – especially delivery, change and reform – along with writings about his
experiences with health care systems in other parts of the world. In 1954 he was hired as a part-time medical officer in the medical department of the Ontario Workmen’s Compensation Board and the following year produced a report on medical administration of that body in conjunction with the Department of Public Health Administration at the University of Toronto. Two analyses of claims, two surveys on the work done by chiropractors and a survey of electrical shock injuries that Dr. Hastings compiled for the Board apparently were not published. He was, however, a joint author of an article on the administrative practices of the Board in relation to the quality of medical care that was accepted by the American Journal of Public Health and published in August 1955.

Dr. Hastings’ visits to India in 1953 and to Japan in 1955 resulted in a number of addresses, both to professionals and to the wider public (see Series 8) and, with reference to Japan, an extensive report and several articles that appeared between 1956 and 1958. The drafts and covering correspondence are in this series; other correspondence and related files are in Series 3, 6 and 8.

In the summer of 1960 Dr. Hastings used a World Health Organization travel fellowship to study medical care, public health and the teaching of medical care in the United Kingdom, Scandinavia, the USSR, India, Ceylon, Singapore, Hong Kong and Japan. While the bulk of his files relating to his trip are found in Series V, his extensive report on his findings is in this series, along with a later article (1961) reflecting on his travels.

The remainder of his writings for the 1960s addresses numerous issues affecting public heath care in Canada, many of which were stressed frequently. They range from the challenges facing medicine generally, change, community health, establishing priorities, prevention, the challenges faced by nurses, and medicare. The last issue was the great debate in medical circles during the last half of the 1960s. Dr. Hastings made his support for the program clear in his writings. His 1962 report, Labour’s plan for a medical care program for Toronto (September 1962), was widely debated and praised. It described by one commentator several years later as “an excellent short review of the theory and experience of group medical practice”, the first such overall study in Canada. Between 1963 and 1965, Dr. Hastings co-authored a special study, Organized community health services, for the Royal Commission on
Health Services, that appeared in 1964 (his policy memo on public health in community health services had been presented to the Commission in January 1963). An article on medicare,
designed for American audiences, appeared in Current History in June 1963 and other articles in Canadian journals appeared after the Commission issued its report.

In July of 1967, Dr. Hastings was an invited participant to an international workshop of medical care experts in Geneva hosted by the International Labour Office. He produced the Canadian section of a monograph on the organization of medical care within the framework of social security that was formally published the following year and translated into French. Two years later he served as a consultant to the World Health Organization/Pan American Health Organization seminar on health administration for executive held in Tobago. His address on the role of the health services administrator was included in the final report, published in 1970.

Dr. Hastings’ first publication of the 1970s was an interim report on his Sault Ste. Marie study (see also Series 5); a related study is his article on pre-paid group practice in that city that appeared in 1973. This was followed the next year by two studies on the impact of social insurance on medical care, one of which was published. The files for his major study on community health centres, dubbed “The Hastings Report” and published in Canadian Welfare in 1972, are found in Series 5.

Between 1971 and 1975 Dr. Hastings headed a research project involving a survey of high level health administrators in Ontario, the results of which were published in 1976 under the title, Ontario Health Administrator Study. In the autumn of 1977 he was a consultant to the Hamilton-Wentworth District Health Council on the Chedoke hospitals and their relation to the district health system; his report was submitted in April 1978. In 1977 and 1978 the Department of Health Administration, with Dr. Hastings as principal investigator, surveyed over 4,000 practising health administrators across Canada. The survey, supported by the Department of National Health and Welfare, was published in 1981. Other articles published in the 1970s included a further analysis of the national health program (1972), a progress report on the community health program in the Faculty of Medicine (1977), and trends and issues in health services (1979).

In 1985 Dr. Hastings’ article, ‘The Canadian health care system – evolution, current status and issues’, appeared in Introduction to nursing management: A Canadian perspective. In it he summarized his thinking over many years. At the time he was also researching issues relating to primary health care at the international level. He was a consultant for the design of and Canadian study principal investigator for the WHO, Regional Office of Europe, Study on patterns of community participation in primary health care that appeared in 1986 and a consultant to the Centre for Public Health Research in Mexico City, the results of which were
published in November that year. 1986 and 1987 also saw the publication of articles on ambulatory care (Dr.Hastings had served for many years as a consultant on this issue to Mount
Sinai Hospital) and community involvement in health, and “The Ontario health system – an overview”, a chapter in Le system de santé de l/Ontario: enseignments pour le Quebec (1987).

A working paper for the Department of National Health and Welfare, Public involvement in health promotion and disease prevention, a comprehensive literature review and analysis, appeared in January 1988. It was co-authored with David Zakus, with whom he produced an unpublished report the next year on community involvement in decision making in health related matters. In the 1990s he continued to write articles and studies. These include his contribution on health services issues to a WHO/CINDI workshop in Toronto in 1990, and another co-authored monograph, Managed care in Canada: the Toronto Hospital’s proposed comprehensive health organization (1991). Further articles and reports on various aspects of health care in Canada appeared between 1991 and 1994.

Addresses and interviews

Dr. Hastings was much in demand as a public speaker throughout his career. In the early 1960s, for example, he often gave more than one a week and by the late 1990s he himself estimated that he had given well over 1,000 addresses. While the majority were delivered at academic and professional gatherings, he also made time to speak at community events, including graduation exercises.

This series contains lists of addresses, correspondence, notes, drafts of addresses, and, often, press coverage. The arrangement is chronological, with correspondence for which accompanying addresses have not survived being arranged in separate files. There is a substantial file of this type for 1963. Interviews are filed at the end of the addresses.

The earliest extant address is his first professional foray on the international scene, at the American Public Health Association conference in October 1954. The theme was administrative practice in relation to the quality of medical care provided under the Ontario Workmen’s Compensation Board. This address and subsequent ones follow the major themes laid out in the earlier series, especially Series 7. Those that were published are filed, for the most part, in Series 7. Some of the addresses are indicated in Appendix 2, which includes entries up to 1994.

After his retirement, Dr. Hastings’ addresses continued to focus primarily on public and community health issues. One, in 1994, was given on the occasion of the tenth anniversary of the Charles Hastings Co-operative, named after his great-uncle, Toronto’s innovative and pioneering medical officer of health. On another occasion, he spoke about the future of community health centres to the International Conference on Community Health Centres in Montreal (December 1995).

While President of the Canadian Public Health Association in 1996-1997, he travelled widely and was much in demand as a speaker. Four venues included a reception in his honour in Winnipeg, the second National Conference on Communicable Disease Control in Toronto, the World Health Organization’s Intersectional Action for Health conference in Halifax, and the annual general meeting of the Northwest Territories branch of the CPHA in Yellowknife. In 1999, after many years of long distance communication, he flew to Manitoba to address the Hamiota District Health Centre Foundation, and in November was a keynote speaker at the 50th annual conference of the Ontario Public Health Association.

In June 2000, at the annual meeting of the Association of Ontario Health Centres, Dr. Hastings reflected on a turning point in his career in his address, “The Hastings Report – then and now”. This is followed by an address delivered at the opening in October 2001 of the Institute of Population and Health, one of four Toronto-based Institutes of Health Research.

The series concludes with three interviews, one on CBC’s radio and television “Citizen’s Forum” in 1960, a ‘telepole’ on CFTO TV in 1962, and an interview with Jan Brown in February 1997.

Reviews

This series documents Conacher’s role as an external assessor and reviewer. At times it is other historians he has been asked to assess for promotion or act as external reviewer of a Ph.D. candidate. At other times it is a review at the institutional level, as in the case of his role in reviewing the Dalhousie Graduate History Department (1977) and the University of Western Ontario, Graduate Department of History (1986). There are also files relating to Conacher acting as referee for articles most of which are filed in four chronological files covering his entire career (1947-1991). These files contain correspondence with publisher as well as drafts of published reviews.

University of Toronto

Throughout his career, Prof. Conacher was active on various University administrative committees. In some cases, he was a member of the committee, in other cases he corresponded with committee members or wrote memos on behalf of both the Dept. of History and/or the Faculty Association. There are files for the following committees on which he served: Plateau committee, sub-committee on staff (1955-56), Policy and Planning committee (1961), Presidential Committee on Appointments (1964-1965), Presidential Advisory Committee on Academic Appointments and Tenure also known as the Haist Committee (1968-1971), Presidential Search Committee (1971). There are also several files on the Faculty of Arts General Committee (1970-74) as well as one file relating to a proposed restructuring of the Faculty of Arts (1976)

There are also several files on University structure including records relating to the Duff Berdalh Report (1963), general memos and correspondence (1965-69),the Committee of Concerned Faculty (1971), the Dumphy Committee for Participation of Faculty in Governance (1976), the Ad Hoc Committee on Academic Freedom (1977), the Budget Advisory Committee (1978-79), the Governing Council, Academic Affairs Committee (1980), and the Decanal Promotion Committee (1981),

He made submissions to Committee on Graduate Studies (1964-65), Placement Services 1967, MacPherson Committee (1967), Robarts Library fundraising letter (1973), review of Scarborough College (1970), the PACE Committee (1971), Library Advisory Committee (1981). There is documentation on a meeting organized by Conacher with Minister of Finance Donald Macdonald relating to university and research funding and his part in proposing an Emeritus College Retirement Complex (1983-1986).

Non-Professional activities

Correspondence, memos, reports, minutes of meetings document Prof. Conacher’s involvement in non-professional associations. Several files relate to his life as a Roman Catholic, including files on the Committee on Higher Education for Catholics (1960-61), Parish Council for Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church 1967-68 and several files relating to his long-time work in the St. Vincent de Paul Society. During the 1950s and 1960s, Prof. Conacher belonged to the Atlantic Treaty Organization. Files contain correspondence with Edgar McInnis, president of the Canadian Institute of International Affairs and with Ronald Ritchie, chairman of the Canadian Atlantic Coordinating Committee Ronald Ritchie. Finally there is one file for an anti-nuclear organization called Third Track for Peace (1984) that included many from the University of Toronto community.

Thesis

Copy of James Conacher's doctoral thesis from Harvard University, entitled "Canadian participation in the Sicilian campaign, 1943: the role of the 1st Canadian Infantry Division."

Correspondence

This series contains, in addition to letters, a wide range of material associated with the ongoing production of the Atlas: notes, memoranda, reports, brochures, partial drafts of the manuscript, photoprints and maps. The arrangement is generally chronological, except where otherwise noted.

Manuscripts and publications

Professor Dean, in collaboration with his colleagues on the Atlas project, began speaking and writing about it almost as soon as it began. These addresses and articles helped maintain scholarly interest in the project as it proceeded and also created a wider public awareness. Both are reflected in the reviews that the Atlas received, and the articles that were written about it, particularly after the Leipzig prize was awarded.

Personal correspondence

This series consists of chronologically arranged, incoming personal correspondence, documenting Ms. Walker’s personal life from 1936 to 1998. Correspondents include family, friends, Hart House Theatre colleagues, sorority sisters and fine art students. Major correspondents are: Burgon Bickersteth, Pat Carson, Norman Endicott, Robert Gill and James Reaney. The letters, mostly written in the 1950’s, document Ms. Walker’s friendships, romances, interest in theatre, and travels throughout Europe.

Hart House Theatre

Marion Walker was Production Assistant at Hart House Theatre from 1946 to 1957. Under the directorship of Robert Gill, she designed sets and costumes for each of the Theatre’s annual four plays. Her first production was St. Joan, starring Charmian King. Other early performers who worked with Ms. Walker at Hart House Theatre included Kate Reid, Donald Sutherland, and William Hutt.

The records in this series pertain to Ms. Walker’s involvement with Hart House Theatre. Textual records include scripts 1946, annotated Hart House Theatre programmes 1946 – 1957, and obituaries for Robert Gill, 1974.

Series also includes approximately 100 photographs of various productions for which Ms. Walker designed costumes and sets. The photographs depict various scenes, actors and set designs. Productions represented are: Romeo and Juliet, 1947; Julius Caesar, 1948; the Seagull, 1948; The Skin of Our Teeth, 1948, The Doctor’s Dilemma, 1948; Crime and Punishment, 1949; Othello, 1949; Fortune My Foe, 1950; The Guardsman, 1950; Captain Brassbound’s Conversion, 1950; Medea, 1950; Henry IV, 1950; Marco Millions, 1950; Richard II, 1951; Pygmalion, 1951; The Madwoman of Chaillot, 1951; The Admirable Crichton, 1952; The Winslow Boy, 1952; Macbeth, 1952; The Wild Duck, 1953; The School for Wives, 1956; and The Innocent, 1957.

Series also contains 8 sketchbooks of costume designs for the following Hart House productions: The Internal Machine, 1946; Othello, 1949; Medea, 1950; Richard II, 1951; School for Wives, 1956; Hamlet, [n.d.]; and King Lear, [n.d.].

Personal/Family

Consists of family biographical information on the Rhodes ancestry, submissions to American and Canadian Who’s Who volumes

Correspondence

This series contains general correspondence files arranged chronologically, and separate individual files arranged alphabetically by correspondent. General files include correspondence relating to his early education at the University of Edinburgh, appointments in Scotland and England, and appointment to the School of Hygiene, University of Toronto. Individual correspondents include, among others, faculty members at the University of Toronto such as Dr. Morris Goldner, Dr. John Hastings, Prof. Hannah Farkas-Himsley, Dr. W. Harding le Riche, former students, professional associates and personal friends.

Church of St. Leonard, Toronto

Dr. Rhodes was Vestry Clerk for Church of St. Leonard (Anglican Church of Canada) for ten years (1980 to 1990). His wife, Harriet, was a member of the Outreach Committee. The series consists of annual reports, budgets, minutes of meetings and some correspondence with the Reverend J. Taylor Pryce.

Laboratory Services Branch, Ministry of Health

This series documents Dr. Rhodes employment with the Ontario Ministry of Health as Associate Medical Director and later Medical Director of the Laboratory Services Branch, including appointment negotiations in 1969 to his retirement in 1977. Dr. Rhodes joined the Laboratory Services Branch following his resignation as Director of the School of Hygiene in 1970.
Files consistent of general correspondence and subject files relating to Autoclaving, Disinfectants in the TB Laboratory, Report of the Technical Advisory Committee on Laboratory Safety, Immunization and surveillance and Task force on care and transportation of communicable disease cases.

Ministry of Natural Resources. Rabies Advisory Committee

In 1979 Dr. Rhodes accepted an appointment as Chairman of the Rabies Advisory Committee within the Ministry of Natural Resources. This series documents some of the activities of this committee focusing primarily on immunization against rabies nationally and internationally. Included are general correspondence relating mainly to his appointment and reappointment to this committee and his retirement, and subject files relating to the World Health Organization conference in Essen, Germany, oral immunization of wildlife, safety standards and a seminar in Maple, Ontario on “Public, Intra- and Inter-Agency Relations in Rabies Control programs: a review”

Talks and addresses

This series contains copies of talks and addresses by Prof. French at professional meetings, symposia, and conferences. They are arranged chronologically and cover such research topics as upper atmospheric mass spectroscopy, the Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyser (TAGA), satellite aerodynamics, molecular beams and ion clustering. Not all talks were scientific in nature. Prof. French was often asked to speak about the role of engineering in space exploration and the relationship between university engineering research and industry as well as the commercialization of scientific applications. Historical talks include a paper on Canadian post-war aerospace development, a 1968 talk on Canadian development in space research, as well as papers telling the story of key scientific innovation such as the story on how TAGA and SCIEX came about and the role of the University of Toronto Innovation Foundation.

Teaching

This series is almost entirely made up of course lecture notes for undergraduate and graduate courses taught by Prof. French. Included here are lectures on Aeroelasticity, Rarefied Gas Dynamics, Gas Surface Interactions, Vacuum Technology, Applied Mass Spectrometry and Quadrapole Theory. There is also one file of Prof. French’s appraisal reports of Ph.D. thesis which are restricted.

Certificates

Certificates cover his period as a student, as a professional engineer with the City of Toronto and as an alumnus of the University of Toronto. This series also contains high school diploma from Malvern Collegiate Institute in Toronto (1924), Ritual of the Calling of an Engineer (1929), Association of Professional Engineers (1939), U of T Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering Spring Reunion certificate (June 1979) and Canadian Institute on Pollution Control recognition for period as President 1953-1964 (1965).

Article, addresses and reports

This series contains copies of Hawkin's articles, addresses and reports many of which were written while advisor to various levels of governments. Subjects that are covered include immigration law and policy, immigrants, migrants and refugees, multiculturalism and race relations. Of some significance is a copy of the "Tremblay Memo", to the then minister of Citizenship and Immigration which sought to redefine the role of voluntary agencies concerned with immigration.

University of Toronto Administration

Files in this series contain minutes of meetings and correspondence documenting activities in the Centre of Linguistics Studies and the Department of Linguistics. Files containing correspondence of the Centre of Linguistics for the 1960s (prior to Prof. Chambers appointment to the University), were acquired by Prof. Chambers from Prof. C.D. Ellis in 1991. In addition to these files, are files documenting Prof. Chambers’ activities relating to honorary degrees, search committees and visiting lecturers.

Professional activities

Throughout his career, Prof. Irving was involved in many associations relating to sociology, archaeology and anthropology both in Canada and the United States. Files in this series contain correspondence, manuscripts of papers, and other documents relating to his activities with the American Anthropological Association, Canadian Archaeological Association, Canadian Sociology and Anthropology Association, Council for Canadian Archaeology (of which he was chair 1968-1970), and Society for American Archaeology. Also included are records relating to some conferences such as the Conference on Japanese Thought and Culture (1975).

University of Toronto

Prof. Irving joined the University of Toronto as professor of anthropology in 1968 after four years at the National Museum of Canada. The files in this series document, among others, include activities of the South West Campus Users Committee, a committee established in 1978 as a result of the report of the South-West Campus Redevelopment Task force. The Task Force reported on space needs and sharing of resources among academic units. The Department of Anthropology was one of many in the “Social Sciences” group who submitted briefs. The Task force recommended the relocation of the Department of Anthropology to Sidney Smith Hall.

There is only on file of lecture notes for ANTH 417, 418 (1973-1974).

Correspondence

This small series contains correspondence, largely of a professional nature and substantially relating to Professor Goudge's activities at the University of Toronto. The topics range from his employment and honours bestowed on him, to matters relating to his students and their academic work, to duties stemming from his sitting on the boards of academic journals. The arrangement is largely by these three groups.

The correspondence in the first files includes offers of employment generally (1934-1970), and employment at the University of Toronto along with annuities, academic leave, and honours, including Goudge's festschrift (1942-1981). Then come files on the supervision of students and the appraisal of doctoral theses (1946-1981) and letters of support for fellowships and scholarships (1967-1985). There is little correspondence relating to the development of administrative policies at the University, though there is a submission by Professor Goudge, in his capacity as chair of the Department of Philosophy, to the Macpherson Committee in 1966.

One of Professor Goudge's long-time friends was A. G. Huntsman, Professor of Marine Biology, with whom he carried on a lengthy (1958-1970) correspondence on philosophical issues relating to science and evolution. This file is followed by one containing Goudge's recollections of his association with A. N. Whitehead at Harvard and the University of Toronto in the 1930s. Professor Huntsman's personal records, which are in the University Archives, complement this correspondence.

The remainder of this series contains correspondence relating to Goudge's involvement with the American Philosophical Association, the Charles S. Peirce Society, the 1979 "Philosophy in Canada" conference, the Royal Society of Canada, and the journals, Dialogue, Encyclopedie Philosophique, Encyclopedia of Philosophy, The Monist, and Philosophy of the Social Sciences.

Research notes

Over the course of forty years, Dr. Biringer established himself as leading researcher in electrical engineering, especially in the areas of non-linear circuits, electromet and electroheat processes. These notes appear to have been taken for his own research, for use in lectures and in relation to his numerous consulting activities. Additional notes, related directly to lectures being given or to consulting activities, appear in those series.

His earliest research is not represented in this series which contains notes, experimental data, and a few articles relating to particular research topics. The principal areas covered are arc furnaces, channel induction furnaces, heating coils, electron beams, electro-magnetic stirring, and frequency changers.

Professional organizations

Dr. Biringer belonged to many professional and scientific organizations, of which two are represented here. He reviewed conference and transactions papers for the American Institute of Electrical Engineers; the file contains lists and notes for the period 1960-1964. His research made him a natural supporter of the Canadian Iron and Steel Research Association, which was formed in 1978, from which he retained early documents on the Association’s activities.

Manuscripts and publications

During the course of his academic and scientific career, Dr. Biringer published over 130 papers. The range of his interests is well represented in this series as it contains about 95 of them. The earliest is 1951, when he was still living in Sweden; the last on file is dated 1987. In addition there are two papers from the 1940s by Swedish academics, one of whom was later a co-author.

Most of the papers in the series are in the form of offprints or photocopies, but there are a number of manuscripts. More than one version of the same paper is also sometimes present.

Senate

Consists of 8 files

  1. Agreement between the Province of Ontario and Victoria University TSS, 1886
  2. Extracts from Senate Minutes, re Bankers' Scholarship, TSS, 1891
  3. Extracts from Senate Minutes , 1892-3, re the Fulton & MacKenzie Scholarships TSS, 1892-1893
  4. Statute No. 48, re Prince's Prize TSS
  5. Statute No. 108, re Blake Scholarship TSS
  6. Statute No. 146, 1883, re Mary Mulock Classical Scholarship TSS, 1883
  7. Statutes re: Ramsay Scholarship, Moss Scholarship, Math & Physics Scholarship TSS, 1885
  8. Statute No. 251, re Edward Blake Matriculation Scholarships

Research Files (general)

Consists of general research files used by Dr. Paul A. Bator in the writing of his Within Reach of Everyone, a history of the School of Hygiene.

Professional correspondence

This series consists of professional correspondence arranged chronologically. The correspondence provides a comprehensive overview of Professor Nowlan’s activities as an economist, teacher, administrator and researcher from 1964 to 1998. Topics include: academic computing, conferences, environmental education, library automation, political correspondence, publications, research grants, sabbaticals, scholarly support, super computer, university appointments and university budgets.

Diaries

This series includes Coxeter’s daily diaries that he kept beginning in Cambridge in 1933. They are mainly the “5 Year” format and briefly note daily activities. There is a continuous run from 1933 to 2002. There is also a 2003 diary kept by Susan Thomas, who was living with and nursing her father. Entries are written by Susan but describe their last months together. The final entry on March 18 2003 was written by Coxeter less than 2 weeks before he died. Predating these diaries, is one notebook from 1928 in which Coxeter detailed his dreams.

Finally there is an appointment book (1953) belonging to Rien Coxeter and researchers should note that Coxeter’s 2001 diary contains the odd entry by Rien for the year 1937.

Publishing

This series contains mainly galleys of pasted text for what is presumed to be Kaleidoscopes: selected writings of H.S.M. Coxeter. It also includes approximately 150-200 geometrical drawings, some original, others printed, but presumably most drawn by Coxeter for his many publications. Finally one file contains a typescript entitled “Summary of the first six chapters of Coxeter’s Projective Geometry, 1964”.

Series also contains copies of Professor Coxeter's publications on mathematical problems that have been translated into other languages. This series does not contain any manuscripts to any of the 12 books Coxeter wrote. Series 2, Professional Correspondence, contains some correspondence with publishers regarding some of his books.

Gulf of Maine case

Consists of copies of Canadian and American counter-memorials and annexes to the International Court of Justice's "Delimitation of the Maritime Boundary in the Gulf of Maine Area, with covering correspondence (Coxeter was an adviser to the Canadian government).

Biographical

This series contains curriculum vitae, career related correspondence regarding job offers, tenure, promotions, pensions, sabbaticals; the awarding of grants including applications and supporting documentations; biographical profiles submitted to Who's Who in America; and requests for financial support for travel.

Conferences and speaking engagements

This series is composed of general files relating to conferences, symposiums, meetings of professional associations and lectures as well as files on specific events. The general files which are arranged chronologically contain mainly correspondence, agenda, commentaries by Prof. Lemon on papers and itineraries. They document his active participation in the field of historical and urban geography.

Files on specific meetings such as the Historical Urbanization in North America Conference (1973), the Ontario Historical Geographers Conference (1976), Urban History Conference (1982) and the Association of American Geographers Meeting (1990), contain the types of records listed above as well as notes, drafts of papers presented by Prof. Lemon and, often, correspondence relating to the planning of these meetings.

Student files

This series includes general files on students, as well as files on individual students kept by Prof. Lemon which document their progress (mainly graduate students) as well as his assessment of them. Files contain correspondence, evaluations, theses proposals and theses, essays, comprehensive oral exams, notes and some letters of reference.

Department of Geography

Records relate to the administration of the Department of Geography and includes copies of correspondence, memoranda, reports, reappraisals of curricula and programs. There are also files relating specifically to the Graduate Committee, of which Prof. Lemon was graduate secretary from 1968-1971 and again during 1979-1980.

New Democratic Party

This series consists of records relating to Prof. Lemon's activities within the New Democratic Party (NDP) including his membership on the provincial Branch Plant Task Force (1970), his work on the executive committees of the ridings of Spadina (1979) and St. Andrew's-St. Patrick's (1980s) as well as his unsuccessful run for the seat in the St. David’s riding during the 1975 provincial elections.

Files contain correspondence, reports, agenda, drafts of speeches, riding newsletters and notes.

Christian Youth Groups

As a young adult, Jim Lemon was a member of various Christian youth groups and records in this series document these early activities. The groups include the Christian World Friendship Fund, the International Christian Youth Fellowship as well as the Canadian and Ontario Youth Fellowship. He was also member of the All Canada Committee of the Ontario Young Peoples Fellowship.

Family papers

This series consists mainly of records belonging to Earl and Grace Lemon, Prof. Lemon's parents, such as correspondence with family, financial records, personal documents and papers relating to their estates. There are also a number of earlier documents relating to the Lemon, Fuller, Sharratt and Prebble families including wills and estate records, indentures, land deeds, and other legal documents. The Lemon family was from West Lorne, Ontario and early records relate to families and lands in this area.

Of particular note is extensive personal correspondence by Jim Lemon sent to his parents beginning in 1954 while he attended Yale Divinity School and dating up to 1984.

Personal financial records

This series contains one file of correspondence relating to personal financial matters (1911-1956) and a collection of personal bank books (ca 1910-1939).

University of Toronto

This series contains predominantly records documenting her academic activities at the University of Toronto. There is correspondence, reports, notes and plans documenting Benson's efforts, along with others, to have a women's athletic building built. The documentation dates from the 1920s through to the 1940s. There is also correspondence and notes relating to other aspects of physical education for women including a proposed affiliation with the Margaret Eaton School as well as a plan for an Ontario College of Physical Education for Women. Finally there is correspondence with colleagues and publication houses relating to the acquisition of off prints of articles as well as a few brochures on events she attended at the University.
Three items were added to this series from B2018-0019: a scrapbook mainly documenting Benson’s career, a Macleans issue from April 1915 describing the graduates of the School of Household Science and a 6oth Anniversary Program for the Faculty of House Hold Science, 1960.

Lecture notes

Most are titled and dated and include pencilled dates of revision on the title pages. Where loose holograph sheets were found, they were placed, in the original order, in small neutral paper folders. The bulk of the material was prepared between 1936 and 1939. The series was not completely organized, but the lectures seem to have been grouped by course.

The lecture notes consist of holograph outlines of lectures of half sheets of paper interspersed with holograph and typewritten sheets of the actual text of the presentation.

Lecture notes filed in black file boxes

Except for their organization in to file boxes, this material is of the same type as that in Series 2. The titles of the file boxes are as follows:

Romantic Poetry
Arnold II [note there is no Arnold I]
English Novel I
English Novel II
Browning
Browning II
Nineteenth Century Minor Prose
Carlyle
Seventeenth Century

Correspondence (Chronological)

Series consists of professional correspondence received from various individuals, governmental bodies, and organizations. Also included is a letter addressed to James Loudon, President of University College, written 1890’s.

Correspondence (Author)

Series consists of correspondence from colleagues and other individuals relating to McIlwraith’s research, teaching, and publishing. Included within the series is correspondence from Margaret Mead, letters related to his research on the Nuxalk Nation, as well as communication regarding a C.B.C. radio script with which he was involved.

Academic Lectures

Series consists of lectures delivered by McIlwraith while teaching at Cambridge University and the University of Toronto. Lectures cover a range of topics within anthropology and are directed to first-year students, third-year medical students, as well as including some graduate-level seminars.

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