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Teaching

This series consists of course files containing lectures, course outlines and reading lists for courses taught by Prof. at Lee at Harvard, Rutgers, the University of Toronto, the Marxist Institute, and others.

Grants

This series consists of grant proposals and their resulting paperwork, primarily from the Canada Council and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council. These include grants for Prof. Lee’s work in Africa.

Student Notebooks

These are Prof. Lee’s notebooks from when he was a student. Many of his instructors are well known in the field of anthropology or worked with Lee during his career. For some of them, their records are also held by the University of Toronto. Instructors include: Ronald Cohen, Dr. C. D. Ellis, J.N. Emerson, Dr. Nathan Keyfitz, Dr. Thomas F. MacIlwraith, Cranford Pratt, Dr. James W. Vanstone, Dr. Fred W. Voget.

Sound and Moving Images

Sound recordings and video document Prof. Lee’s research. Reel to reel tapes contain interviews, testimonies with !Kung San bushmen, talks given by Lee on this very topic, taped vocabulary lists of the !Kung San people’s language, native music from Botswana and one radio interview with Prof. Lee. Two videos document a discussion among women academics on the role of women in a hunter and gatherer society. Finally two tapes contain a partial recording of the symposium of Political Struggles of Native Peoples, organized by Prof. Lee in 1972.

Teaching materials

Series consists of examination papers set, lecture notes, and student papers from Kenins's time at the Faculty of Music, University of Toronto.

Education

This series contains certificates and diplomas, correspondence, course and lab notes, term papers and memorabilia documenting aspects of Davidson Black’s education, running from the Wellesley School through Harbord Collegiate and the Faculties of Medicine and Arts at the University of Toronto. There is also a file on Davidson’s summer project in 1907 to earn money for his Bachelor of Arts program, prospecting in the Temagami Forest Reserve.

Publications and addresses

This series documents only one of Davidson Black’s publications, but more of his addresses, in particular some he delivered in 1925 before his discovery of Peking Man, and the Croonian Lecture in December 1932 that cemented the acceptance of his research.

Published Manuscripts

This Series consists of articles, reviews and monographs written by Harold Innis. Includes chapters of books, which also appeared as journal articles, annotated versions of chapters and articles, and several revisions of his book "Empire and Communications".

University of Toronto

This Series consists of files relating to his departmental activities at the University, and to the "Values" Discussion Group of which Innis was a member.

Compositions : scores, parts, and sketches

Series consists of manuscript scores and parts, and sketches, for Lothar Klein's instrumental, vocal, choral, chamber, and orchestral works. File also contains film and incidental music written by Klein.

Research and reference material

Series consists of bound and loose leaf research and reference notes handwritten and typed by Douglas Ellory Pett relating to his thesis and extensive research on the early Anglican sermons of John Henry Newman. Includes detailed bibliographic entries on published works; meticulous notes on biblical references used by Newman in his sermons; transcriptions of Newman's correspondence and archival records; as well as notes on contemporary accounts of Newman's preaching activities.

Lecture Notes

Consists of:

  • lecture notes; course material; term papers, 1967-1986; student files, 1978-1981 [boxes /003 to /009]
  • non-University of Toronto lecture notes [box /010]

Education and Personal Activities

The series partially documents Francess Halpenny’s education received at Maxville Sunday School in 1927 ; at the Public Schools of the Counties of Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry in 1928 ; and at the Oakwood Collegiate Institute, from 1931 to 1936. It also partially documents her undergraduate education, from 1937 to 1940, (B.A. in English literature) and her graduate studies (M.A. English literature) at the University of Toronto, in 1940 and 1941. The series documents the friendship between Francess Halpenny and Elizabeth and Jennifer Harper, between 1983 and 1986 ; Halpenny’s participation to social events, such as the dinner for 40th wedding anniversary of Morley and Clara Thomas in 1982, a dinner at Rideau Hall in 1983 and an evening in honour of Floyd S. Chalmer, Jean A. Chalmer and John Beckwith in 1984.

The series consists of 7 files including certificates and diplomas, course notes, Faculty of Arts Class and Prize Lists, correspondence and press clippings. It also includes one letter received from J. Mavor Moore, 16 October 1989 regarding Halpenny’s course notes he had kept from the University years ; a certificate of Honour Award received in recognition of her contribution to the undergraduate life at the University of Toronto, 7 June 1940 ; personal correspondence received after a period of illness in 1984 ; the address she gave at J. Russell Harper funeral and his obituary for the Royal Society of Canada.

Honours and Awards

The series documents the honours and awards received by Francess Halpenny during her career. It also documents the lectures and seminars she gave as Distinguished Visitor at the University of Alberta in 1989.

The series consists of 20 files including correspondence, ceremony proceedings, diplomas, convocation addresses, personal notes and press clippings. The series also contains 92 photographs of Halpenny taken during various convocation ceremonies or with dignitaries.

University of Toronto Press

The series consists of 1 files including a token received from University of Toronto Press apprentices in sign of recognition for Francess Halpenny’s support ; address she gave at the launch of "The Clear Spirit", in 1967; correspondence received when she retired at the age of 65 in 1984.

National Library of Canada

The series partially documents Francess Halpenny’s activities as a member of the National Library of Canada’s advisory board from 1976 to 1982. It also partially documents Halpenny’s activities as a member of the Advisory board committee on bibliographical services of Canada, from 1981 to 1982 ; and her participation to the "Colloquium on Availability of Publications in Canada", Quebec City, June 17 and 18, 1987.

The series consists of 4 files including correspondence, minutes of meetings, news release, notes and correspondence.

Research and Publications

The series partially documents Francess Halpenny’s research and publishing activities relating to publishing generally, Canadian libraries, Canadian theatre and Royal Society of Canada fellows, from 1969 to 1996. The series also partially documents her participation into activities of the Literary History of Canada’s editorial board from 1984 to 1990.

The series consists of 8 files including working notes, drafts (some hand written), correspondence, minutes of meetings, grant application and reviews.

Talks and Conferences

The series partially documents Francess Halpenny’s participation as lecturer, moderator and/or attendee to talks and conferences on publishing, biography and Canadian studies, between 1972 and 1993. It also documents a talk she gave about staying active and aging at the symposium "Age-itation", in 1986.

The series consists of 20 files including correspondence, conference programs, lists of participants, working notes, drafts (some hand written) of addresses and/or papers and press clippings.

Manuscripts and Publications

W. H. Fraser's principal writing were of textbooks on French and German grammar, co-authored by John Squair and William Henry Van der Smissen. They were used for two generations in Ontario schools and had wide acceptance elsewhere. They went through many editions, being published in Canada by Copp Clark, in the United States by D. C. Heath of Boston, and in the United Kingdom by George Harrap in London. On his own, Fraser wrote, in 1887, Un Philosophe sous les toits, Journal d'un Homme Hereux, par Emile Souvestre, and, later, a slim volume of Italian Exercises. Associated with the last is a scrapbook, mounted pages cut from a French grammar text with annotations in Italian.

Professional associations and conferences

This series consists of files on organizations, conferences, symposia and workshops, arranged alphabetically. The most thoroughly documented ones are those in which Professor McLeod was involved in an organizational or executive capacity. The earliest files document his involvement in multicultural issues in Saskatchewan, specifically problems associated with language instruction in French. They contain correspondence, notes, briefs submitted to the Royal Commission on Bilingualism and Biculturalism and to the Saskatchewan Committee on Instruction in Languages other than English, associated
reports, and a seminar on bilingual education (1964-1966). Later, in Ontario, his overlapping duties as chair of the Ontario Multicultural Education Conference Committee (1980-1983) and president of the Canadian Council for Multicultural and Intercultural Education (1981-1985), for example, enabled him to play a central role in organizing the early national conferences on multicultural education. He organized and chaired two colloquiums on “Multiculturalism – Teaching and Learning”, sponsored by FEUT (1990, 1991), and was a co-organizer of the International Colloquium on Ethnicity, Conflict and Cooperation held in Moscow in 1992. McLeod also attended a number of international conferences as a Canadian representative. These include four (1977-1987) world congresses of the Comparative and International Education Association, and the Circumpolar Conference of Indigenous People in Iceland (1993).

McLeod was involved in an executive capacity in many organizations, the files for which contain the correspondence, notes and memoranda, minutes and reports that reveal the extent of his involvement. The principal bodies, for which there is extensive documentation, are the Canadian Association for Second Language Teachers (CASALT), Canadian Ethnic Studies Association (CESA), Canadian Council for Multicultural and Intercultural Education (CCMIE), Canadian History of Education Association (CHEA), Multicultural Health Coalition (MHC), the Multiculturalism and Aging Seniors Coordinating Committee (MASCC), and the Ontario Multicultural Association (OMAMO). He was also frequently asked to advise governments on policy. He gave, for example, evidence to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Multiculturalism and served on the Ontario Advisory Committee on Multiculturalism.

Born-digital records

These born-digital records include professional materials that relate to Greenfield's appointment at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (correspondence with students and faculty, letters of reference, memoranda, and manuscripts), editorial work related to Greenfield's position as Associate Editor of "Curriculum Inquiry," manuscripts and correspondence related to the organization "Gay Fathers of Toronto," manuscripts for "The educational programs and purposes of the Batchewana Band: a management audit,"and personal correspondence and manuscripts relating to finances, politics, and family.

Correspondence

The correspondents in this series number just under four hundred individuals, of whom sixty-two read and commented on the entire manuscript (these names are listed on page 723 of the 2002 hardcover edition). The correspondents include Professor Friedland’s research assistants, archivists in the University of Toronto Archives, officials and editors at the University of Toronto Press, other editors, writers and independent researchers with an interest in the University’s history, and members of the public that Professor Friedland met in the course of his research and his giving of talks about the history of the University. The majority of the correspondents are academics and administrative personnel at the University of Toronto and elsewhere who were asked for information or offered their expertise. Some of the correspondence is post-publication reaction to the book.

The research assistants (in addition to those listed in Series I), are Sara Burke, David Bronskill, Colin Grey, Graham Rawlinson and Katrina Wyman. Of the staff in the University of Toronto Archives, Harold Averill was seconded part-time to the project to direct the researchers to the appropriate sources in the University Archives, to offer his knowledge of the history of the University and to read the manuscript. Other correspondents from the Archives are Garron Wells (University Archivist), Marnee Gamble (special media archivist) and Loryl MacDonald (administrative records archivist). The University of Toronto Press, the publisher of the book, is represented by Val Cooke, Ani Deyirmenjian, Malgosia Halliop, Bill Harnum, Anne Laughlin,
Melissa Pitts, and Ron Schoeffel. Presidents (past and current) of the University represented are: Robert Birgeneau, Claude Bissell, George Connell, Robert Prichard, and David Strangway. Some of the academics and university administrators forwarded drafts of articles or excerpts from books they were writing, while others commented on the manuscript or portions thereof. Papers or lengthy memoranda and reports are present on a cross-section of activities, disciplines themes and individuals relating to the University including (with the names of the correspondents in brackets). They include the admission of women (Sara Burke), botanical gardens (John Court), chemistry (Susanne McClelland), Connaught Laboratories (George Connell), engineering (Richard White), fees policy (David Stager), gays and lesbians (David Rayside), Jacob Hirschfelder (Sheldon J. Godfrey), Margaret Eaton School (John Byl), history of medicine (Jacalyn Duffin), medicine (David Bronskill), No. 4 General Hospital at Salonika, Greece during World War I (Mary Louise Gaby), philosophy (John Slater), the proposed Wolfe’s University (D. V. Anderson), women (Katrina Wyman), and women in graduate studies (Natalie Zemon Davis).

In addition to letters, the files may contain articles, notes, memoranda, background documents and publications, and the occasional press clipping A few of the files contain historical items, dating back to 1887, that had belonged early graduates and were forwarded by their descendants, Professor Friedland’s correspondents. The detailed comments on the drafts of the book by the correspondents in this series may, for the most part, be found in Series 4.

Personal and family

This series consists of files documenting Professor Friedland’s personal and family activities. It begins with a number of files documenting Friedland’s activities as a student and professor of law at the University of Toronto, his post-retirement professional and other activities. There follow files relating to members of his family, arranged by name, which focus broadly on family affairs and more specifically on personal lives, including professional and social activities, achievements, births, weddings and deaths. These are followed by other files containing correspondence sent home from England, Europe and Israel, and relating to the Friedland residences on Hillsdale Avenue and Belsize Drive.

The files contain correspondence, appointment books, certificates, curriculum vitae, greeting cards, honours, notes, notices, legal documents such as passports and wills, medical reports, programmes, postcards, photographs, and press clippings (including obituaries).

Honours

The files in this series contain correspondence, addresses, certificates, programmes, and a photoprint relating to honours bestowed in Professor Friedland.

The honours described herein are: Queen’s Council (Canada), 1976; James Marshall Tory Dean’s Chair, Faculty of Law, University of Toronto, 1996; an LLD degree from Cambridge University (2000); and an honorary degree from the University of Toronto (2001).

Correspondence

The correspondence files in this series are arranged alphabetically by author. They document Professor Friedland’s activities as a friend, as a student advisor and thesis supervisor, as a colleague assisting in honours bestowed on his peers, as an author, and as an authority on legal matters. They also document the increased leisure that came with official retirement.

The correspondence touches on many aspects of Dr. Friedland’s life, both personal and professional. It reveals his enormous network of contacts in legal and academic circles ranging from Lord Denning down to lowly law students. The letters cover a wide range of topics and issues, including some very topical ones such as international terrorism. Dr. Friedland received numerous requests for references from students and colleagues and, because he sat on the manuscript review committee of the University of Toronto Press, he was also asked to evaluate many manuscripts.

Some of the files contain commentary on legal issues on which Dr. Friedland was working. They may also hold drafts of articles forwarded by colleagues for commentary or presented a complementary copies [published copies have been removed, though the appropriate references have been retained], letters of congratulation and of reference. There is also correspondence regarding and programmes of conferences, and correspondence re and programmes for installation ceremonies. There are numerous invitations to dinners and other events and tributes on the deaths of friends and colleagues and notes on any of the above. Also present are greeting cards and several photographs.

Research and publications

This series contains material relating to a number of Professor Friedland’s publications. For four of his books – Double jeopardy, The trials of Israel Lipski, The case of Valentine Shortis, and The death of Old Man Rice – the files contain only a small amount of correspondence, press clippings, and promotional material. The manuscripts for these books, along with the supporting correspondence and related material, are located in Friedland’s earlier accession, B1998-0006.

The series concentrates on three of Friedland’s publications, each of which generated a number of spin-off articles and much commentary. The files for these titles complement the more complete record of activities contained in B1998-0006. Controlling misconduct in the military, his 1997 study for the federal Commission of enquiry into the deployment of Canadian Forces in Somalia, attracted much attention. So did ‘Borderline justice’, his 1992-1996 study with Kent Roach comparing jury selection in the two Niagaras, one Canadian and the other American. Friedland delivered papers on their findings at conferences and articles appeared in several journals and in a festschrift. The third publication, A place apart: Judicial independence and accountability in Canada (1995), continued the spirited public debate over the issue, one that is still going on and which is documented here in conferences, seminars, reports, and even a video, along with supporting correspondence and notes. A file on the Chinese translation of this volume is located in ‘Series VII: Other activities’. There are also drafts of papers on topics such as legal aid and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, along with drafts of the manuscript for the eighth edition (1997) of his book (co-authored by Kent Roach), Cases and materials on criminal law and procedures.

Other activities

The records in this series document some of Dr. Friedland’s professional activities, mostly outside the Faculty of Law (he retired in 1998 but still teaches). The first three boxes focus on his relationship with the University of Toronto Press where he served on its Board of Directors and has sat on its Manuscripts Review Committee for over twenty years, including being chair since 1995. Nearly all of the files relate to the Committee, and contain extensive correspondence with other committee members and the executive of the Press, including commentary on policy decisions, including manuscripts being considered for publication.

Dr. Friedland has also sat on the board of directors of the Osgoode Society, which promotes the writing of legal history. The five files relating to this society consist principally of memoranda, minutes and supporting documentation and there are few annotations and notes. The original material consists primarily of Dr. Friedland’s 1999 oral history interview conducted as a part of the Society’s Chief Justice Bora Laskin Project and his file on the Society’s twentieth anniversary symposium in June 1999, “History goes to Court”, where he chaired the panel on ‘Other leading cases’.

Dr. Friedland was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 1983 (the files relating to his activities prior to 1997 are located in accession B1998-0006). In 1997 and 1999 he chaired the Innis-Gérin Medal selection committee. In 1997 he became a member of the nominating committee of Academy II (Humanities and Social Sciences) of the Royal Society of Canada and in 1998 was elected to the Council of Academy II for a three-year term. These activities, and his involvement in the 1999 RSC symposium in Edmonton, are documented here.

In October 2000 Dr. Friedland went to Beijing for ten days to discuss with Chinese judges issues relating to judicial independence. This project consisted of a series of seminars in Canada-China’s Senior Judges Training program sponsored by the Canadian International Development Agency and held at the National Judges College of China. Three different seminars were held – one on ‘judicial ethics’ in October (in which Dr. Friedland participated) and two in November on ‘judicial review’ and ‘case management’. The correspondence, notes, and reports relating to the project are contained in these files, along with drafts, in Chinese, of the published version of Dr. Friedland’s study on judicial independence, A place apart.

The remaining files in the series document a number Dr. Friedland’s other activities between 1995 and 2002. Included are a few addresses, some of his travels, and his membership in or association with a number of professional organizations such as the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research and the Law Commission of Canada. Dr. Friedland was appointed an officer of the Order of Canada in 1990 and awarded the Canada Council’s Molson Prize for ‘outstanding achievements and exceptional contribution to the enrichment of the cultural life of Canada’ in 1995. The files on the Molson Seminar and the Order of Canada reflect his ongoing responsibilities as a recipient of these awards. The last of the files document his continuing involvement in activities and issues at the University of Toronto, ranging from the Centre for International Studies’ program on conflict management to the Sports Hall of Fame selection committee.

Course notes

Course notes of Park's aunt, Mary Louise McLennan, in Educations, 1914-15, and later by her students in the London Country Council; Teachers' outlines for senior bible class which Parks taught; his course notes University of Toronto Schools (1916-1920), Upper Canada College (1921-1923); course and lab notes for University of Toronto undergraduate courses in Arts, in Medicine and post-graduate courses and internships in medicine in Toronto; course notes for post-doctoral course in medicine, London (1932-33), University of Freiburg (1933-34), and Harvard (1934-35).

McLennan, Mary Louise

Employment: University of Toronto

Professor Richards was lured to the University of Toronto in 1980 by the new Dean, Blanche van Ginkel, who had earlier recruited several new young faculty members, including Alberto Perez Gomez and Daniel Libeskind. Both had left by the time Richards arrived and he soon found out why. He “walked into a rat’s nest of warring factions. The inflexible ideologues, led by Prof. Peter Pragnell, were totally closed to student and younger faculty’s interests in post-modernism.” Richards soon became disillusioned and found reward only through the new ‘Introduction to Architecture’ course he developed and taught at University College. He also co-ordinated the 1980-1981 fourth-year core programme and (with Michael Kirkland) the fall 1981 studio in Venice [1]. After a year he left Toronto for the position of associate professor in the School of Architecture at the University of Waterloo.

Although Professor Richards maintained contact with the University of Toronto (he withdrew his candidacy for the deanship in 1985) and actually moved from Waterloo to Toronto in 1990, it was not until January 1997 that he returned to the Faculty, this time as dean, an appointment that was to last 7 ½ years. “He led a division of 22 core and 48 part-time faculty, 20 staff, and 275 graduate students, which offers three degree programs: a professional Master of Architecture, a professional Master of Landscape Architecture, and a post-professional Master of Urban Design…He gained approvals for and implemented two long-range academic plans, the 2000 PLAN and the 2004 PLAN, leading to the reinvigoration of the creative life of the school. His accomplishments included facilitating the incremental renovation of the building at 230 College Street by leading Toronto architects and establishing the Faculty’s first endowed chair, The Frank Gehry International Visiting Chair in Architectural Design, launched in 2003. He established the Faculty’s first Advancement Office and raised more than $8-million in new funding through the division’s “Design the Future” campaign. [He also]…played a key role in assisting the University with architect selection processes for major projects on its three campuses.” [2] On the St. George campus three significant buildings by international architects were erected: the Terrence Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Bimolecular Research (Alliance + Behnisch Architekten), the Leslie L. Dan Pharmacy Building (Norman Foster) and Graduate House (Morphosis, Thom Mayne).

The earliest records in the series consist of correspondence, memoranda, reports and associated material documenting Professor Richards’ stint as assistant professor in 1980-1981; the files cover the activities mentioned above. There are also files on the 1985 search for a dean and the attempt to close the School, followed by several on Richards’ appointment as dean. Files are then arranged in descending order of hierarchy, beginning with the Governing Council, its Physical Planning and Design Advisory Committee’s campus planning initiatives (concerning, especially, Graduate House), and meetings of principals, deans, academic directors and chairs. Except for the above committees, those mentioned in Professor Richards’ curriculum vitae are largely absent from this series.

The records of the School/Faculty from 1997-2007 include correspondence; Richards’ activities and his reports; budgets, the 2000 and 2004 long-range plans, and fundraising initiatives. There are files on the restructuring of courses and the renaming and repositioning of the School (using, in part, the expertise of designer Bruce Mau) and the renovations to 230 College Street (the Shore Moffatt Library and the Eric Arthur Gallery). Richards kept extensive files on trips to Japan, Hong Kong and China relating to the Faculty’s ‘Designs for Living’ cultural exchange project. The series concludes with files on the creation of the Gehry Chair; courses taught; lecture series; exhibitions; and publicity. The files on the courses taught contain course outlines, assignments, tests, examination questions, and some lectures.

[1] Personal communication from Larry Richards, 23 July 2009
[2] Drawn from Professor Richard’s curriculum vitae (June 2004), p. 3.

Architecture, art and design juries

Professor Richards has been since the early 1980s an active participant on architecture, art and design juries. The juries adjudicated projects ranging from student competitions to architectural grants (Canada Council), urban design awards (Etobicoke, Mississauga, Scarborough, Toronto), public art competitions (City of Waterloo, ice sculptures in Toronto), building projects (Coptic community master plan and cathedral, new city hall for Markham, Ontario), redevelopment projects such as Harbourfront and Pearson Airport, to architectural awards. Professor Richards was not a member of the jury for the Kitchener City Hall competition (1989) but he assembled a lot of material and also wrote about it. He was also a member of the Greater Toronto Airport Authority’s selection committee for lead architect in its Lester B. Pearson International Airport transformation project (1997).

The files contain correspondence, notes, photographs, architectural drawings, press coverage and reports. The arrangement is chronological and by the name of the project. The full name and date of each competition is listed in Professor Richards’ curriculum vitae (B2007-0011/001(02)-(06).

Advising, assessing and consulting

In addition to his work as a juror, Professor Richards was active as a consultant or advisor to a number of projects, most associated with architectural and design, but some with academic matters such as tenure and the external supervision of theses. Some of the activities listed in his curriculum vitae are filed with other series and others are not documented in this series. The arrangement is chronologically by the name of the organization or individual concerned. The files may contain any or all of the following: correspondence, notes, memoranda, reports, photographs, architectural drawings and site plans.

The most heavily documented of his consulting work is with the selection of an architect for the Canadian Clay and Glass Gallery in Waterloo, the Environmental Sciences Building at Trent University; as a thesis advisor (1989-1990) to Brian Christianson of Miami University whose thesis was on Canadian architecture; as a member of the 2006 program review for the School of Architecture at McGill University; and his being a consultant to and a member of the Royal Ontario Museum’s architectural advisory committee regarding ‘Renaissance ROM’ and Daniel Libeskind’s project.. Two other well documented activities are his work as a member of the curatorial advisory board of Power Plant (1987-1990) and as a member of the visiting team of the National Architectural Accrediting Board (USA) to Texas State University (1992).

Manuscripts and publications

Professor Richards’ interest in nurturing a broad understanding of an appreciation for the art of architecture, especially as it applies to modern architecture and the influences on him, ranging from Japanese and Chinese architecture to the design of commercial advertisements and popular cultural events such as raves, are documented in his writings. This series covers unpublished manuscripts and many, but not all, of the articles and books listed in Professor Richards’ curriculum vitae (June 2004), along with some that have appeared since. The arrangement is by name of title, filed chronologically.

The series begins with two boxes of files of articles about Professor Richards or in which he is mentioned. These are followed by letters to the editor, book reviews, and manuscripts and publications. The principal unpublished work is ‘The latent energies of Michelangelo’s private library’ (1974). The last title in the series is Richard’s foreword to Chu Dongzhu’s Starting design on architecture (2006).

Addresses

Dr. Pimlott's expertise in wildlife preservation and the ecology resulted in requests to speak at conferences, government bodies and meetings of various local groups interested in the environment. These files consist of rough notes prepared for talks in Halifax, Sault Ste Marie, Regina and other unidentified locations on such topics as Arctic ecology and off-shore drilling, history of Algonquin Wildlands League, and wolves and men, among others. Also included is a tape recording of a talk by Stephen Lewis to public meeting of the Algonquin Wildlands League.

Correspondence

This series consists of correspondence from individuals and organizations throughout most of his academic career. The correspondence covers a wide variety of subjects and issues, and should be consulted along with other series described in this finding aid.
This series is arranged in 2 groups: correspondence arranged alphabetically by name of writer and correspondence by subject. Writers include colleagues such as David Catchpole, J.D.G. Dunn, Charlie Moule, Ben Meyer, Wayne McCready and Prof. Richardson’s brother, Douglas Richardson, professor of fine art at the University of Toronto. Subject files include correspondence with academic associations, journals and publishers, on individuals such as Victor Graham, John Franklin, George Brooke, Douglas Le Pan, among others. Also included is a file “Honors and Honorarium” which supplements personal information in Series 1.

Other presentations and informal lectures

This series contains files documenting Prof. Richardson’s presentations generally outside the community of scholars associated with pure academic religious studies. As a recognized expert and scholar in his field, Prof. Richardson was frequently invited to speak to groups both inside and outside the University, in informal settings. Files in this series may contain manuscripts, notes, correspondence, programmes and other documents prepared for presentations to church groups like Temple Emanu-El and the Yorkminster Park Baptist Church, members of the general public, students, faculty, associations and others interested in historical or current topics relating to religion. Unlike Series 9 and 10, this series contains works not usually submitted for publication or other scholarly distribution. In addition, one will find some of his earliest presentations, mainly in the form of sermons, delivered while a student in divinity and campus minister at Knox College in the University of Toronto (see /034(01)-(06)).

Scholarly papers

In addition to published works, Prof. Richardson made numerous presentations at conferences, symposia, invited lectures, memorials, convocations, and other occasions. The papers contained in this series were, for the most part, prepared for academic and other scholarly activities such as meetings of associations like the Society for Biblical Literature, Canadian Society of Biblical Studies, Canadian Society for the Study of Religion and the SNTS and represent a significant portion of Prof. Richardson’s body of work. Other presentations were made at many Canadian universities as invited lecturer and to various groups at the University of Toronto. A few files contain papers submitted, but never published. Indeed, many of these presentations are on topics that formed the basis of future publications. Researchers are therefore referred to Series 10 for topics of written works not represented in this series.

Files may contain correspondence, manuscripts, and notes.

Results 251 to 300 of 2785