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Scrapbooks (microfilm copies)

This series consists of 10 negative microfilm reels of Robert S. Gill's personal scrapbooks which he loaned to the Metropolitan Toronto Reference Library (Theatre Dept) for microfilming. He retained the originals after the project was completed

Personal

Davidson Black kept a diary throughout much of his adult life. There are 28 volumes in this series. The earliest is for 1902, the year he entered medicine at the University of Toronto; it includes a tally of monthly expenses. The last diary is for 1934, the final entry being for 9 March, six days before his death. For each of the years 1922 and 1925, there are two volumes of diaries. There are no diaries present for the years 1907, 1908, 1909, 1911, and 1912. The diary Davidson kept while on active service during World War I is filed with his service records in Series 4. Most of the entries are brief as the diaries, except for 1902, are small. Some of the loose entries with the diaries are longer.

A number of items document his personal activities. The earliest is a small well-thumbed copy of 'The Book of Common Prayer', presented to him by his mother on his 9th birthday in 1893. A notebook, a journal, and permits document his early interest in ornithology. Finally, there are files of memorabilia, poems and sketches, and on honours bestowed on him later in life, along with twelve diplomas and certificates.

Frank Buck

The series contains material related to Frank Buck the animal hunter, movie actor, producer, director and author. Material consists of ads, movie stills, books (primarily in comic book style), and trading cards.

Photographs

Series consists of colour and black and white photographs (including negatives) accumulated by Nouwen, and colour slides taken by him and others. Photographs not taken by Nouwen were gathered mainly from friends and acquaintances through correspondence, over a period of approximately 30 years. The photographs were stored by Nouwen and his administrative assistant(s) in files, or displayed on one of several large bulletin boards Nouwen used in his office and photograph albums compiled. Some photographs that arrived with correspondence were kept in the General Files series with their letter of origin, while others which were not clearly attached to a letter were separated and added to this series.

Subject matter depicted in the photographs include professional portraits of Nouwen; Nouwen in both his professional and private capacities at: the Yale and Harvard Divinity Schools, and at L'Arche Daybreak (leading church services, at birthdays and Christmas celebrations), religious events (baptisms, first communions, ordinations and weddings); as well as his travels to Peru and Bolivia, the United States, France, and other countries; and with his family in the Netherlands both as a child and as an adult. Photographs also depict Nouwen's friends, their families, and L'Arche Daybreak assistants and core members. In addition, a large number of photographs in this series (approximately one fifth), document Nouwen's time spent in Germany with a flying trapeze troupe, The Flying Rodleighs.

Slides were taken by Nouwen of Martin Luther King, Jr’s civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery, AL, in March 1965; of the University of Notre Dame; vacations, including a trip to Greece; and of Nouwen with Rodleigh Stevens of The Flying Rodleighs in 1995.

This series is arranged in three sub-series:

1.15.1. Photographs Accumulated by Henri Nouwen
1.15.2. Early Personal Photographs
1.15.3. Photograph Albums

The series include both file- and item-level descriptions. Photographs and slides are arranged in chronological order where possible.

Academic activity files

This series contains documents pulled together by Prof. Armatage for her tenure review as well as for subsequent yearly reviews. Files contain mainly professional correspondence, descriptive reports on research and teaching activities, yearly activity reports and clippings about her work. There is information on promotions, awards, research leaves and grants. Clippings in this series also give evidence to Prof. Armatage’s work outside mainstream academia including her role as a documentary filmmaker and curator for the Toronto International Film Festival.

Publicity, correspondence, and various other documents

Series consists of newspaper articles by and about Leslie Bell, concert programs, scrapbooks, documents from the Canadian Music Educators' Association (CMEA), and photographs. Bell wrote a column for the Toronto Star from 1950 until 1961, and many of his columns are included in this series. The CMEA documents are included as Bell was a founder of the association and its executive director from 1959 until his death in 1962. He also edited the Canadian Music Educator journal during that time. The series also contains a file of correspondence, photographs, and certificates for Bell's son L. Richard Bell.

Graphic records

Includes portraits of Williams, a photo of him as a lab assistant doing war research (1941), receiving the Dunlop Award (1977), in a laboratory (1979), a classroom, at a departmental luncheon, and on retreat. Also includes a photo of the Polymer Corp. Plant.

University of Toronto Administrative Committees

This series documents some of Prof. McNeill's administrative positions within the University including member of the Slowpoke Reactor Committee (1970-1991); the Council of the Faculty of Medicine (1962-1967); the Presidential Advisory Committee on Appointments and Terms of Office (Haist Committee) (1964-1968); as well as various administrative positions with Trinity College. The amount and type of records vary from one position to another but usually include copies of minutes, correspondence, reports and memoranda and some original correspondence between Prof. McNeill and other committee members.

Personal files

This small series contains Dr. Glass' curriculum vitae, entries for biographical dictionaries, press clippings and articles; appointment calendars for 1974 and 1976; files from his employment as a stress analysts at Canadair (1945) and in 1947 as an aeronautical engineer with the Canadian Car and Foundry; and a file containing an offer of a position at Technion, the Israel Institute of Technology (1971-1972).

Correspondence

This series contains Dr. Glass' extensive correspondence files on a wide variety of personal and professional issues. The arrangement by broad topics (consulting, 1955-1982; "personal" correspondence from his office, 1950-1969), then general correspondence, filed chronologically (1959-1987), and finally by alphabetically by name of organization for the files relating to Dr. Glass' involvement in Jewish issues.

The last category begins with files on Canada-Israel cultural exchange, including the work of the Canada-Israel Chamber of Commerce and Industry (1972-1981). These are followed by files of the University of Toronto chapter of Canadian Professors for Peace in the Middle East (1974-1987), but the greatest volume relates to the conditions of Jews in the Soviet Union. Much of the work on this issue was done through the Canadian Academic Committee for Soviet Jewry and the Committee of Concerned Scientists, including its Canadian branch. Of particular concern was the treatment of the scientist, Benjamin Levich, in whose honour conferences were organized. Dr. Glass played a very active role in these events.

The files on Jewish issues contain, in addition to letters, press coverage, notes, memoranda, and minutes.

Sabbatical leave and trips

Dr. Glass was granted sabbatical leave in 1957-1958, 1970-1971, and 1974-1975. His first leave was spent in England, primarily at the Imperial College of Science and Technology in London. His proposed sabbatical leave for 1966-1967 had to be postponed and he took it in 1970-1971. He arranged a global trip, which took him to the 8th International Shock Tube Symposium in London and the International Symposium on the Dynamics of Ionized Gases in Tokyo.

In 1972 he began planning for his next sabbatical. It began in England, and continued through France, the Netherlands, Belgium, and Denmark. As his book, Shock Waves and Man, had recently appeared, he was much in demand both in academic and research (both military and civilian) circles as a speaker. He then went on to Israel, Iran, India, Thailand, Hong Kong, and Japan. While in Japan as a visiting professor, he attended the 10th International Shock Tube Symposium. He returned to Toronto via Hawaii, San Francisco and Chicago, giving lectures and seminars as he went.

In addition to his sabbatical leaves, Dr. Glass travelled widely. His first major trip was to the USSR in 1961, with a side vacation to Israel. In 1963, he visited a number of universities in the mid and western United States. In 1965, he was back in Europe attending the VII Symposium on Advanced Problems and Methods in Fluid Dynamics in Poland. In 1980, he made another tour of the Far East, visiting China as a guest of the Academy of Sciences, and then going on to Japan. In 1985, he made a return visit, receiving an "honorary professoriate" from the Nanjing Aeronautical Institute.

The files contain correspondence, calendars and diaries, notes, research notes, conference programs, abstracts, drafts of lectures and addresses, and photoprints. There is extensive material on the symposia mentioned above.

Organizations and conferences

Dr. Glass belonged to many professional associations, and was in wide demand at conferences. He also, as already has been noted, was deeply involved in a number of organizations devoted to various causes on behalf of Jewish peoples. The activities of both groups overlapped, especially on the issue of scientific freedom.

The organizations represented here are the Committee on Scientific Freedom and Responsibility of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (1980-1981), the Canadian Committee of Scientists and Scholars (1980-1981), the Commission on Post-Secondary Education in Ontario (1971), the Committee of Concerned Scientists (1980-1986), the 2nd International Colloquium on Gasdynamics of Explosions held in Novosibirisk, USSR, in 1969 (1966-1972), the International Conference in Honour of Andrei Sakharov (1981), the 15th International Congress of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics held at the University of Toronto in 1980 (1979-1980), the Sino-Judaic Institute (1981-1990), and the University of Toronto protest regarding anti-Semitism in the USSR (1976-1978).

The organization files contain primarily correspondence, with some background and other reports, programs, notes, manuscripts and press clippings. The conference files also contain some addresses.

The arrangement is alphabetical.

Vault photographs

These images are those selected mainly for printing in Acland’s book, Medieval Structure : the Gothic Vault. University of Toronto Press, 1972. Some may not have actually made it into the final printing. They show architectural features of various structures throughout Europe, Africa and the Middle East. Originally these were probably taken around the same time as European photographs described in Series 8 – possibly during the same trip since many of the places are common to both series of prints.

This series contains the following arrangement:

/004P 247 photoprints: b&w ; 8x10 or smaller
4 photoprints: colour ; 8x10 or smaller
Mainly 8x10s these prints were identified as “European Arches”. Most are identified by location and have therefore been sorted alphabetically by place name. Except for a small number, Acland was the photographer. Some are numbered and mostly likely correspond to their use in the book but the correlation is unclear since the illustrations in the book are not numbered.

/004P 31 photoprints: b&w ; 8x10
These prints were originally arranged by chapter and this arrangement has been kept. Notations made by Acland on the back often note the page number.

/005P- 197 negatives: b&w ; 8x10

/007P These are enlarged negatives likely used for printing. Each is individually foldered since adhesive from the tape used to border their edges has made them tacky. Originally, all would have been sorted by chapter but this arrangement was lost. Whatever arrangement existed was maintained and where possible folders are annotated with the page number. The original folder has also been kept since it lists all images found in that chapter. Negatives not matched to their chapters are filed in Box /007. It is possible that some of these may not have been used in the book.

/001P 57 negatives : b&w ; 4x3.5 or smaller
29 negatives : colour ; 21/4’ x 21/4”
These are mostly original negatives of vaults many of which Acland identified. Some appear to copy negatives. There is no particular arrangement although original groupings were maintained.

Slides

This series includes slides most likely used to illustrate lectures, publications and possibly CBC programs in which he was involved. Most slides are undated but or identified as to their site location. There is also one box of slides of architectural student projects.

Graphic

Photographs and negatives document Putnam, his family, the Department of Geography field trips and research field trips. Many photographs were taken by Putnam and later, his son Bob Putnam, for possible use in books.

There are photographs of Putnam and Lyman Chapman working in the field during the 1930s, Geography field trips with student through the 1940s and 1950s and of Canadian landscapes and geographical highlights photographed during various trips. There is also one group shot of the Geography Department taken in either the late 1950s or early 1960s.

Finally, there is one box of unidentified early negatives. These have yet to be processed but seem to be a mix of early family images 1910s and 20s and some documenting Putnam’s early field trips.

Graphic materials

Photography was a hobby of Hull's and consequently this accession contains some of his work as it pertains to the University community, the Department of Computer Science, his career and his involvement in the Arts and Letters Club. Includes colour 4x6 prints and corresponding negatives.

Includes:

Dept. of Computer Science, Party and Show, ca. 1981
Portrait, Chancellor of Trinity College, 1981?
Hull's retirement dinner, May 1987
University of Toronto Women's Association Art Show, Oct 1987
UTWA, Art Show, Nov 1989
Visit of Eric Infeld , 1995
Photos of staff of the Department of Computer Science taken for DCS brochure (identified), 1996
Photograph of Hull receiving an Honourary Degree from Dalhousie University, 1987

Negatives to prints

hotographs and negatives documenting events of the Arts and Letters Club especially the annual Spring Show and the Boar's Head Dinner, 1987-1993. (unprocessed)

Photographs

As an engineering student at the University of Toronto, D. F. McCarthy was involved in a number of activities including water polo, and as a member, 4th year Executive of Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering. Included are photographs water polo teams, graduation photos for high school and university, class photographs, as a professional engineer with the City of Toronto and as an alumnus of U of T., including the Chancellor’s Circle (1994) and Arbor Award (1993). Also included is sketch by Owen Staples of “Memorial Tower University of Toronto” ca 1930.

Personal correspondence

This series contains mainly correspondence received by Clara Benson from family and friends. Two files contain correspondence that is undated, but seems to be predominantly created prior to her retirement in 1945. Correspondents include, among others, letters from her parents, her brother Bingley, her sisters Constance, Jessie, and Ethel, cousins, school friends, professors such as A. B. Macallum, and colleagues such as Professor Annie Laird. Subjects discussed include studies at University of Toronto, congratulations on her doctorate in 1903, postcards home to family about her trip to Europe in 1904, and 1910-1913, matters relating to her involvement on the Executive Committee of the Student Volunteer Movement for Foreign Missions (1912), and other professional and academic activities. Also includes file of correspondence about and from French children sponsored by Dr. Benson such as Maryse Deslandes and Madeleine Killian (1958-1964).

Other activities

In 1921, Dr. Benson was elected the first president of the Women’s Athletic Association of University of Toronto and was involved from the beginning in the campaign to build an athletic building for women. Among the records relating to this activity are correspondence, notes, financial statements and blueprints of proposed buildings. Also included in this series are correspondence, minutes and reports relating to her work as Chair of the Foreign Committee of the YWCA (Young Women’s Christian Association) focusing primarily on an international survey on leadership (1930-1932). Other documents include two undated and unsigned manuscripts of stories, a collection of cards acquired during a trip to the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893, and a scrapbook of pressed flowers with identification collected by Clara Benson ca 1890’s.

Elgin Rowland Hastings

This series is comprised almost wholly of material assembled by Elgin Hastings while a student in the then new five-year Bachelor of Medicine program at the University of Toronto between 1908 and 1913. The records consist primarily of a comprehensive collection of course notes, laboratory notes and drawings. Hastings kept detailed notes, dated his notebooks and many of the lectures and exercises, and often recorded the name of the professor or tutor teaching the course. He also preserved a list of all the courses for which he had registered at the beginning of each academic year and the professors who taught them. He did, however, take some additional courses that were not listed; one example is a course in psychiatry taught by Ernest Jones during the Easter term 1912. The course notes are arranged by academic year and alphabetically by name of course within each year.

The series also contains certificates relating to Hastings’ medical education and professional certification, a student handbook, memorabilia of his extra-curricular activities, photographs of some of his classmates, photographs including family members and the graduating Class of 1913 (Medicine), and a transcript of the evidence given in a court case in 1914 (two pages of Hastings’ evidence have been torn out).

Other professional activities

Dr. Hastings’ professional activities are largely related to his interests in community medicine and often have close links to his work at the University of Toronto. The files are arranged alphabetically by the name of the organization or event with which they are most closely associated.

The series begins with a file on his participation in a round table discussion on “surveillance and the role of public health” for the Commission of Inquiry on the Blood System in Canada [Krever Commission] in 1995. This is followed by background material for and memoranda, statements and briefs, with which Dr. Hastings was involved, that were submitted to the Royal Commission on Health Services between 1961 and 1963, along with subsequent press coverage. He and Dr. William Mosley of the School of Hygiene submitted a massive report, “Organized community health services” in 1963, following a brief, drafts of which are preserved here, presented by the School’s director, Dr. Andrew Rhodes, the previous year.

Hastings was also a member of committees of the Canadian Public Health Association and the United Church of Canada that submitted briefs in 1962.

Other files document Dr. Hastings’ activities with Canadian College of Health Service Executives, for which he chaired the Extendicare Award Selection Committee for 1984-1986; in the mid-1980s, the Canadian Council on Social Development, for which he helped develop strategies for community health services, and the Canadian Hospital Association, for which he participated in a study on the future of hospitals in Canada.

Dr. Hastings was made an honorary life member of the Canadian Public Health Association for his many contributions. The files (boxes 036-038) document his activities as a president (1996-1997), as a member of its board of directors and several committees, including public health practices, archives, higher education and, especially, international health secretariat and review (1988-1992) and a planning committee for a national workshop on public health education (1991). There is a substantial file on the drafting of a national health plan for the Palestinian people (1993). Other files include the restructuring of Ontario health services (1997), the Canadian Institutes for Health Research, and the Association’s annual conferences for 1980 and from 1991 to 2000. There are also a number of briefs and reports.

The files on the Canadian Welfare Council document the activities of its special committee on health services’ submissions to the Royal Commission on Health Services. These are followed by files on health issues faced by the City of Toronto in 1992 and 2002; Dr. Hastings had been a member of the liaison committees of the University of Toronto with the teaching health units for East York, North York and the City of Toronto.

In 1971 Dr. Hastings went on full-time leave for a year from the University of Toronto to direct a major study of a community health centre project for the Conference of Health Ministers of Canada. His files (boxes 039-041) include correspondence, memoranda, notes, budgets, position papers, minutes of meetings, interim and progress reports, and working seminars, along with drafts of the final report and reactions to it. The report, instantly dubbed “The Hastings Report”, was widely praised and cemented Dr. Hastings’ reputation as a leading authority in his field.

Other activities documented in this series include two conferences on epidemiology, one in Cali, Columbia during his tour of public health services in South America in 1959 and the other a joint National Cancer Institute of Canada/U of T meeting in 1988. There are files for conferences on comparative health services at Ditchley, England (1972) and Dublin (1980), and for consulting on health administration for the Informatie en Communicatie Unie in the Netherlands (1981) and the Oakville-Trafalgar Memorial Hospital (1992). There is also a copy of an undated (ca. 1976) and unpublished report on an overview of the Canadian health system.

Dr. Hastings’ association with the Pan American Health Organization dates from the 1960s. Late in 1964 he was a participant in a special program on health planning sponsored by the World Health Organization, the PAHO and the United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America, for which he visited Chile, Uruguay and Argentina, already referred to in Series 3. The files here date largely from 1974, when he critiqued a long-term planning report for the WHO, and his consultancy two years later for that organization on health services in Brazil and Chile. This and other work lead to him receiving the PAHO Administration Award for 1987. The majority of the PAHO files relate to the Canadian-Caribbean Health Initiative (boxes 042-044), a joint PAHO/University of Toronto/CPHA project for which, from its inception in 1988, Dr. Hastings served as chair of the steering committee. There are also files relating to the Caribbean Public Health Association and the Caribbean Regional Epidemiology Centre.

Dr. Hastings acted as a consultant and expert on many issues relating to community health, including two in Quebec -- programs in community health (1980) and the Quebec Commission de l’Enquéte sur les Services Santé (1987), and pediatric issues for the Thames Valley District Health Council (1988). One of his early research projects (1966-1970) was a joint Canada-WHO study of the delivery of health services in Sault Ste. Marie, due to the then unique program in Canada of Algoma Steel Corporation offering its employees a choice of health benefits through the local district health association or a private carrier. The findings were published in 1973, a follow-up study was carried out by the Ontario Ministry of Health in 1975, and a history of the Sault Ste. Marie and District Group Health Association followed in 1981.

In 1992 Dr. Hastings was invited to address a seminar on heath care systems organized by the Mexican Foundation for Health and the National Academy of Medicine, to be held the
following March in Mexico City. He kept extensive files on the proceedings. In 1994 he was invited to be a consultant to the World Bank’s health project for the newly independent republic of Georgia. He visited the country on three occasions over the next two years and kept detailed files on his activities, including correspondence, notes, reports, and photographs.

The series ends with several activities related to Dr. Hastings’ travels in the 1950s and the early 1960s to Asia, and to his involvement with the World Health Organization both at the beginning and the end of his career. In 1953, on the way back to Canada from the his World University Service trip to India (see Series 3 and below), he stopped off in Britain to attend the first World Conference on Medical Education in London, to take in the Queen’s coronation, and to visit Scotland, especially Edinburgh and Iona. He kept a file on this conference and on the third world conference in New Delhi in 1966, after which he toured northern India, making a side trip to Madras and Ludhiana, and then going on to Hong Kong and Japan.

In 1960 a World Health Organization travel fellowship enabled Dr. Hastings to study medical care, public health and the teaching of social medicine in the United Kingdom, Scandinavia, the USSR, India, Ceylon, Singapore, and Japan. Again, he kept detailed records of his travels, including notes and accounts of his impressions, especially on the Soviet Union. Afterwards, he wrote a detailed report on what he saw. Later WHO –related activities include an employment offer as chief of WHO’s Organization of Medical Care Unit in Geneva (1969), which Dr. Hastings reluctantly turned down; and his work as member of WHO’s Expert Advisory Panel on Public Health Administration between 1974 and 1990.

In the summer of 1953, as the University of Toronto’s representative at the World University Service International Mysore Seminar, Dr. Hastings had an opportunity to gain first hand insights into and an understanding of the many problems facing developing countries. He visited India, Ceylon and Pakistan, and carefully preserved his correspondence, notes, reports and photographs. Two years later, he was the University’s faculty member on the WUS International Japan Seminar, and spent a further month studying medical education and medical care in Japan through an arrangement with the World Health Organization. His correspondence, diaries, minutes of meetings, and notes served him well; he was much in demand on the lecture circuit afterwards, especially after his report on medical education in Japan and other articles reflecting on his experiences appeared in 1956 and 1957. The series ends with a 1962 report on the WUS student tuberculosis sanatorium in Japan and a file on the WUS Chile Seminar in 1964.

Correspondence and biographical

Consists of correspondence with colleagues, publishers, and his wife. Also includes a framed letter from Duncan Campbell Scott, 2 annotated books, educational diplomas and certificates, memoirs, scrapbooks, graduation robes, and various medals.

Incoming correspondence

Series consists of Fred T. Flahiff's personal correspondence, deposited with the library due to its relevance to Flahiff's work on Sheila Watson. Includes 53 letters from Sheila Watson, 3 letters and 34 pages of poetry and 20 illustrations in ink and pastel (17 of which are photocopied) from Wilfred Watson. Also includes letters from others: one letter from B.J. Mitchell; one letter from a Mike (last name unknown), regarding an entry on Sheila Watson in the UBC yearbook "Totem" from 1931; one letter from Douglas M. Gibson, publisher at McClelland and Stewart.

Dale/Ryckman family

This series contains an assortment of documents relating to the Dale and Ryckman families. It includes the diary of Margaret Dale of her trip to Europe in 1930 (see Series 1 above for correspondence), Fredericka Dale’s diary of her trip with her daughter, Frances , to Europe in 1934 (for Frances’ account see Sous Fonds 3, Series 1, marriage certificate for William Dale and Fredericka Ryckman, education diplomas and other memorabilia of Frederika Ryckman, testimonials for her sister Louise Ryckman, Victoria University Senate resolution on the death of her father, Rev. E. B. Ryckman in 1916 and correspondence between the Dale children for three years, 1923, 1924 and 1927. There are four portraits included in this series: one of Fredericka Ryckman Dale (1902), two of her father Rev. Dr. Edward B. Ryckman and one of her mother Emmaline Baird Ryckman (ca. 188-).

Personal

These boxes contain personal materials relating to my early years, my undergraduate years, various correspondence from and to family members and others, materials relating to the immediate family, files involving homes and other property that we owned, my income tax returns, other financial matters, and assorted other files.

There is relatively little material relating to my early years, including my high school years (files 3 and 4). I saved very little of that material. Similarly there is very little with respect to my University undergraduate years (files 5-16). There are no files relating to courses in Commerce and Finance (file 7). There are a few scattered things involving the university fraternity, the University College Literary and Athletic Society (UC “Lit”), U of T athletics, Hart House, and the Historical Club (files 6-13). A few postcards and letters and newspapers relate to the World University Service (WUS) trip to West Africa in the summer of 1955 and the many trips thumbing through the states while an undergraduate and law student (files 14 and 15). Material relating to my time at law school is contained in the “Law School” sub-series in Series 4.

I have included correspondence and other documents involving our children and the immediate family (files 17-27) and letters received from Judy’s and my folks while we were in Israel (files 28-30). Letters relating to our times in Cambridge are found in the boxes on Double Jeopardy and Law Reform (Series 5).

There are files relating to the purchase and sale of 169 Hillsdale, our first house, and the purchase and rentals while away of 77 Belsize Drive, our second house (files 31-38). There is also a file on the purchase and sale of property in Barrie, Ontario (file 39). I have not included at this time the material that I have on the purchase from Dean WPM Kennedy’s son, Frere, in 1983 of the Kennedy property in Kearney, Ontario, where our summer place is.

I have included a file relating to the estates of Ben and Sarah Garfield, Judy’s uncle and aunt, of which I was an executor (file 48). There are also other financial matters in the files, particularly my income tax returns for the years 1963-1992 (files 50 and 52-57).

Other miscellaneous files include records of the Public Lending Rights scheme (file 41), a Cambridge Boat Race Dinner speech that I gave in 1990 (file 42), some correspondence with Jewish groups (file 43), and various who’s who entries (file 40).

Lectures

This series consists of lecture files used by Harris for teaching mainly undergraduate English courses. There is a file for Course 316 on Higher Education taught in the mid 1960s. Among the files on a course of History and theory of English Studies (1984) is a manuscript of paper entitled “The role of English in general education 1890-1950” written by Harris while as a Ph.D. student in 1951 at the University of Michigan.(B2002-0003/002(09) Files contain hand written and typed notes, some outlines to lectures, clippings and essays related to the lecture topic. These files more than likely began as notes Harris took while a student of English at the University of Toronto during the 1940s and formed the basis of his early lectures. Overtime Harris added to the files and they clearly became his teaching lectures.
Lectures relating to period literature are filed first (19th century poetry, 20th century prose), followed by types of literature (i.e. poetry, tragedies, the novel, the theatre) and finally followed by files on individual authors arranged alphabetically.

Of a more ambiguous nature are files on philosophy, which may or may not have been used for teaching. They are filed after the English Literature files and are followed by the one file on a course in Higher Education mentioned above.

Also includes slides used to illustrate a lecture on the past deans of the School of Graduate Studies, given at the University of Toronto on November 18, 1986; copy of text in case file.

Graphic material

This series contains photoprints and slides (1966-1972) of the School of Library Science on McCaul St., Robarts Library, 140 St. George St., the ground breaking ceremony for Robarts and FLIS Buildings, group photos of former Directors of the School of Library Science, including Brian Land, Bertha Bassam, Winifred Barnstead, Francess Halpenny.

Also includes a watercolour of the old Library painted by Brian Land’s mother-in-law, ca 1920, and a drawing of the construction of Robarts done by Leslie Sirluck, ca 1969.

Biographical

This series gives a good overview of Prof. Prentice’s career. It includes biographies, C.V.s, correspondence on appointments, newspaper clippings, honours received and photographs.

Conferences

The series consists of files relating to various conferences attended or organized by Prof. Eddie. Among the conferences documented is the First Conference on German Cliometrics, a joint project of the University of Toronto’s Joint Initiative in German and European Studies and Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (Institute of Economic History) held in Toronto September 23 to 26, 1999. Prof. Eddie co-ordinated this conference with his colleague, Dr. Joerg Baten. Among the records documenting this conference are 10 cassette tapes of sessions as well as informal digital photographs of participants at sessions and social activities. Photographs were taken by Prof. Eddie and a student.
Other files document conferences held at the University of Toronto, International History Congress at Leuven (1989-1990), the Economic History Congress (IEHA) in Buenos Aires (2002), and the 2nd Conference on German Cliometrics, Tübingen, Germany (2006) and the Economic History Society at the University of Nottingham (2008). Files may contain correspondence, notes, manuscripts of papers delivered both by Prof. Eddie and others, etc.

Correspondence

Prof. Heichelheim maintained a regular correspondence with friends, family and colleagues both in Canada and around the world up to the year of his death. His brother’s name was Arthur Heichelheim and he lived in London England. This series dominates this fonds and includes correspondence with classical scholars at Cambridge and Oxford and at the University of Giessen (Prof. Heichelheim’s former employer), as well as at the University of Toronto. Such scholars include many of his co-authors such as E.N. Adler, Prof. F. L. Griffith, J. G. Tait, T. Frank, H. Michel, Prof. Elemer Balogh and Prof. Cedric Yeo. Correspondence is in English or German, depending on the nationality of the correspondent.

During World War II he continued to maintain ongoing correspondence with his brother and other family members, along with other scholars left in Europe and frequently describe living conditions, lost friends, the death camps and establishment of a Jewish state in Palestine. Correspondence with family and friends is often in German.

Manuscripts: book reviews and articles

This series contains drafts of some of Heichelheim’s manuscripts for published and unpublished articles and books reviews. Among these works is a series of files of manuscripts and correspondence relating to articles submitted to the Oxford Classical Dictionary on Celtic gods, ancient economic history etc. 1938-1939.

Articles, reviews, published addresses and referee comments

This series contains records documenting Prof. Russell’s extensive production of both published and unpublished works including articles, papers, reviews, informal talks and addresses. Published articles were produced primarily for scholarly journals and document his specialized knowledge on Canada’s Supreme Court, the Charter of Rights and Canadian constitution, aboriginal rights both in Canada and Australia, commentaries for national media such as the Toronto Star and Globe and Mail, and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.

Talks and addresses from accession B2005-0001 include his speeches on receiving honorary degrees at University of Guelph (1998) and University of Toronto (2001) as well as invited talks to private business such as the Canadian Club, Royal Trust, Toronto Club, as well as universities and other academic institutions in Canada and abroad.

Also included are his commentaries as referee for various manuscripts submitted by other writers for publication. Files contain predominantly drafts of manuscripts, notes, and correspondence, as well as photocopies of related materials.

Photographs

This series contains photographs documenting some of Peter Russell’s activities while participating mainly in academic and professional functions. Most are informal colour snapshots taken while at academic conferences and meetings, as well as in social situations with colleagues and students. Activities documented include trips to China, his class of students for POL 299Y, CBA meeting in Yellowknife and receiving awards and honorary degrees from University of Calgary and University of Toronto. Most photographs were either taken by or with Prof. Russell’s camera or sent to him by friends and colleagues. A small album of 17 photographs compiled by Prof. Russell documents his activities primarily in the 1980’s.

Photographs

Photographs document all aspects of Bissell’s life. Formal portraits of Bissell have been filed at the beginning of this series followed by a chronological arrangement of group portraits, events and ceremonies. Several photographs document visiting dignitaries to the University while Bissell was president. This series also includes photographs of Bissell’s trip to China in 1962.

Photographs

Series includes several formal portraits of Christine Bissell including two done by photographer Josef Karsh as well as a snapshot of Christine with family members.

Talks and addresses

This series documents Prof. Hume’s talks and addresses on various subjects. General interest topics often discussed the growth of computers in society, changes in technology, and the development of computer languages. These were written for general public consumption at invited lectures. There are also a few talks on physics.

More technical talks and addresses focused on computer programming, computer graphics, and computer languages such as TRANSCODE, FORTRAN and Turing. These were most often delivered at professional meetings and symposiums. Prof. Hume recorded a series of lectures with accompanying slides on FORTRAN and another computer language called LISP. These were recorded as a type of tutorial on how to use the University’s computer and were designed to teach computer programming to a wide range of academic users at the University of Toronto. This series contains a copy of the tapes on reel to reel as well as some of the accompanying slides - although it is not clear exactly how they originally matched up. Of particular note are the very early views of the Computer Center and its computers that were included in the slide lecture showing the IBM 650, the IBM 7090 and the IBM 7094.

Files are arranged chronologically with undated talks placed at the end. They contain notes, copies of the talks, overhead transparencies, related event programs and correspondence. In addition, there is a card index of talks that essentially gives outlines and notes. Some of these are related to files in this series while others are unique talks. Apart from the FORTRAN lectures, there is one taped lecture of Prof. Hume giving a key note address at the New College Honours Students dinner.

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