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University of Toronto Archives and Records Management Services Series
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Family and personal

This series contains material relating to the le Riche family generally, to specific members of it – Harding le Riche’s, mother, siblings, wife, children, and grandchildren, personal information about le Riche himself, and his scrapbooks. The files on Professor le Riche contain biographical information, curriculum vitae, and press coverage of his activities, along with files on honours bestowed, memorabilia, a riding accident, and his trip to South Africa in 1964. B2006-0004/004 contains several certificates of awards both loose and in a large album. This series also includes family documents from 1888-1930s. (B2006-0004/001)

The largest single component of this series is the scrapbooks. They contain press clipping of items of family, academic, and political interest, programmes for and invitations to social and professional events, some photographs, the occasional letter, a large number of first day covers, and memorabilia relating to Professor le Riche’s travels and other activities. The first scrapbook (1945-1946) is filed in B2003-0012/001; the later scrapbooks (1964-1966, 1967-1973, 1973-1978, and 1978-1986) are filed in B2003-0012/002 to /005. Scrapbook for 1966-1968 is filed in B2006-0004/004. Loose items associated with scrapbooks dating from 1967 to 1986 are filed in folders in B2003-0012/ 001, /004 and /005, as appropriate.

The series concludes with an album of 9 records, titled “Beyond Antiquity: A series of lectures on the origins of man by Professor Raymond Dart, Professor Emeritus, University of the Witswatersrand, Johnannesburg, South Africa”, with an accompanying printed outline of the lectures. The series was produced by the South African Broadcasting Corporation in 1966, and le Riche was a contributor to it. Raymond Dart had been a professor of anatomy at Wits when le Riche was a student there, and was just beginning his career as an anthropologist. Le Riche was already interested in the subject and some of his friends visited the Sterkfontein caves in August 1936 with Robert Broom, the country’s leading paleontologist, who, a few days later, discovered the first Australopithecus at the site. Dart became famous for his description of the Taung skull, Australopithecus africannus.

Correspondence

This series contains correspondence from 1898-1950. Baillie was a professor of Marine Biology at the UofT. The correspondence in this series is mainly with family and friends while Baillie was stations in England during WWI, but also contains pre-war correspondence from Baillie to his parents, written while he was assigned to a marine biological station at St. Andrews, New Brunswick. There is also correspondence between Baillie and his son, while his son served overseas in WWII.

Teaching files

This series contains files on courses Professor Lang taught at the University of Toronto and Central Michigan University. The files contain a combination of any of correspondence, memos, course applications, course outlines, bibliographies, background papers. Some files contain marks. Not all of Professor Lang’s courses are represented in this series.

The files are grouped by institution, the level of courses, and by ascending course number at the undergraduate and then the graduate level.

Lecture Notes

Consists of:

  • lecture notes; course material; term papers, 1967-1986; student files, 1978-1981 [boxes /003 to /009]
  • non-University of Toronto lecture notes [box /010]

Education and Personal Activities

The series partially documents Francess Halpenny’s education received at Maxville Sunday School in 1927 ; at the Public Schools of the Counties of Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry in 1928 ; and at the Oakwood Collegiate Institute, from 1931 to 1936. It also partially documents her undergraduate education, from 1937 to 1940, (B.A. in English literature) and her graduate studies (M.A. English literature) at the University of Toronto, in 1940 and 1941. The series documents the friendship between Francess Halpenny and Elizabeth and Jennifer Harper, between 1983 and 1986 ; Halpenny’s participation to social events, such as the dinner for 40th wedding anniversary of Morley and Clara Thomas in 1982, a dinner at Rideau Hall in 1983 and an evening in honour of Floyd S. Chalmer, Jean A. Chalmer and John Beckwith in 1984.

The series consists of 7 files including certificates and diplomas, course notes, Faculty of Arts Class and Prize Lists, correspondence and press clippings. It also includes one letter received from J. Mavor Moore, 16 October 1989 regarding Halpenny’s course notes he had kept from the University years ; a certificate of Honour Award received in recognition of her contribution to the undergraduate life at the University of Toronto, 7 June 1940 ; personal correspondence received after a period of illness in 1984 ; the address she gave at J. Russell Harper funeral and his obituary for the Royal Society of Canada.

Honours and Awards

The series documents the honours and awards received by Francess Halpenny during her career. It also documents the lectures and seminars she gave as Distinguished Visitor at the University of Alberta in 1989.

The series consists of 20 files including correspondence, ceremony proceedings, diplomas, convocation addresses, personal notes and press clippings. The series also contains 92 photographs of Halpenny taken during various convocation ceremonies or with dignitaries.

University of Toronto Press

The series consists of 1 files including a token received from University of Toronto Press apprentices in sign of recognition for Francess Halpenny’s support ; address she gave at the launch of "The Clear Spirit", in 1967; correspondence received when she retired at the age of 65 in 1984.

National Library of Canada

The series partially documents Francess Halpenny’s activities as a member of the National Library of Canada’s advisory board from 1976 to 1982. It also partially documents Halpenny’s activities as a member of the Advisory board committee on bibliographical services of Canada, from 1981 to 1982 ; and her participation to the "Colloquium on Availability of Publications in Canada", Quebec City, June 17 and 18, 1987.

The series consists of 4 files including correspondence, minutes of meetings, news release, notes and correspondence.

Research and Publications

The series partially documents Francess Halpenny’s research and publishing activities relating to publishing generally, Canadian libraries, Canadian theatre and Royal Society of Canada fellows, from 1969 to 1996. The series also partially documents her participation into activities of the Literary History of Canada’s editorial board from 1984 to 1990.

The series consists of 8 files including working notes, drafts (some hand written), correspondence, minutes of meetings, grant application and reviews.

Talks and Conferences

The series partially documents Francess Halpenny’s participation as lecturer, moderator and/or attendee to talks and conferences on publishing, biography and Canadian studies, between 1972 and 1993. It also documents a talk she gave about staying active and aging at the symposium "Age-itation", in 1986.

The series consists of 20 files including correspondence, conference programs, lists of participants, working notes, drafts (some hand written) of addresses and/or papers and press clippings.

Manuscripts and Publications

W. H. Fraser's principal writing were of textbooks on French and German grammar, co-authored by John Squair and William Henry Van der Smissen. They were used for two generations in Ontario schools and had wide acceptance elsewhere. They went through many editions, being published in Canada by Copp Clark, in the United States by D. C. Heath of Boston, and in the United Kingdom by George Harrap in London. On his own, Fraser wrote, in 1887, Un Philosophe sous les toits, Journal d'un Homme Hereux, par Emile Souvestre, and, later, a slim volume of Italian Exercises. Associated with the last is a scrapbook, mounted pages cut from a French grammar text with annotations in Italian.

Education

This series begins with a single file of course notes taken by Frieda Fraser while a Form V student at Havergal College in 1915-1916. It is followed by others containing course and laboratory notes for the Physics and Biology section of the undergraduate honours Arts program at University College for second, third, and fourth year (1918-1921).

This is followed by a notebook for a biological project at St. Andrew's, New Brunswick, for the summer of 1921. It also contains a number of sketches that have no relationship to the course.

The series ends with some course and laboratory notes for the Bachelor of Medicine program at the University of Toronto.

Manuscripts, publications, and addresses

Professor Fraser had eleven scientific papers published between 1928 and 1964, though she wrote many reports and some papers that were not published. This series contains offprints of all of her published papers and a draft of one. Also included in this series is a short story she wrote in 1909, at the age of 10; a typescript of her undated "Report of a case of pernicious anemia", and an address, "D.P.T. vaccines" that she delivered on 4 December, 1964.

Research: general files

Beginning in the mid-1920s and even after her retirement in 1965, Dr. Fraser carried on research at the University of Toronto. For the first twenty years, usually with her brother, Donald, her research concentrated on the development of scarlet fever and other antitoxins. This research formed part of ongoing studies of certain aspects of infection and immunity in pneumonia, diphtheria, and scarlet fever, often in conjunction with health departments across Canada. It also involved the testing of products and the monitoring of scarlet fever outbreaks.

As the Second World War began, she started investigating the incidence of agglutinative types of strains of haemolytic streptococcus in a small scarlet fever ward at the Riverdale Isolation Hospital. Through the use of exacting technical procedures, she was able to prove the transfer of agglutinative types from one patient to another in the same ward. She continued work in this field and, in 1941-1942, by examining cultures from 650 people, was able to identify the incidence of particular types of streptococci in various groups of persons. The techniques perfected proved of particular use in studying the outbreak of scarlet fever in Royal Canadian Air Force bases across southern Ontario between 1941 and 1944. In 1942-1943 she worked on the preparation of a combined antigen containing diphtheria toxoid, tetanus toxoid, and tannic acid precipitate of scarlet fever toxin.

During the war, her research also included the development of penicillin, especially in relation to the campaign to combat venereal disease. From January, 1944, in co-operation with the penicillin committee of the armed forces, she conducted a bacteriological investigation of clinical material from patients treated with penicillin. At the same time she was actively engaged in the investigation of two antibiotics, streptothricin and streptomycin.

After the War Dr. Fraser continued her laboratory and clinical studies in antibiotics. One aspect of her research, between 1946 and 1948, was to test the effectiveness of penicillin in oil and wax in the treatment of gonorrhoea. In 1947, as a member of team including researchers from the Department of Botany, she spent much of her available time testing a group of new strain of micro-organisms for their activity against selected cultures. A number of new preparations of penicillin designed to prolong its action were also tested on laboratory animals and then on humans, this project extending into 1949. Further refinements in the testing of the effectiveness of penicillin were continued the next year.

In 1948 Dr. Fraser began a major study of antibiotic substances with special reference to tubercle bacillus and gram-negative cocci. A year later she was studying the antibiotic activity of several strains of penicillin against gram-negative bacilli of the enteric group. In 1950 she began another two-year project, studying the toxicity and protective effect of partially purified antibiotic substances isolated from fungi, utilizing
samples of Arctic soil. She also investigated the conditions for the production of antibiotics in deep culture.

In 1952 she began expanding on earlier research by exploring methods for the concentration of antibiotic from one of the strains of penicillin previously studied. The following year she was investigating methods for the electrophoresis on paper strips of vaccinia virus and a strain of bacteriophage, research that continued to be refined over the next several years with particular references to viruses. By 1957 she was beginning chemical tests of the fractions obtained by electrophoresis separation. Simple synthetic media were also developed for the propagation of phage on a non-pathogenic mycobacterium. In the late 1950s and the early 1960s Dr. Fraser's principal research was in a major project on the development of the anti-tuberculosis antigen, compound 377.

The eight boxes in this series contain research notes, background material, correspondence, data, articles and reports. The associated nine boxes of records of laboratory experiments are found in the next series.

The series begins with three boxes (019-021) of mimeographed and printed articles, and reports, and research notes on areas of interest, especially scarlet fever, tuberculosis, cultures, penicillin, electrophoresis, rheumatic fever, serum sickness, smallpox, spectrophotometry staphylococcus, streptococcus and venereal disease. The arrangement is largely alphabetical by topic.

Box 022 contains applications for, reports on, and correspondence regarding research grants for the years 1944-1964, on projects such as testing the effectiveness of penicillin, on new antibiotics, the electrophoresis of viruses, and tuberculosis vaccine trials.

Boxes 023 and 024 contain correspondence, notes, Dick, skin and lethal test results for research on scarlet fever streptococcus toxin production, and papers describing the results. Included are data for tests on rabbits, in schools, isolation hospitals, the Ontario School for the Deaf, orphanages, and students in the Public Health Nursing program at the University of Toronto. Much of this research was carried out at
the Connaught Laboratories, and the researchers corresponded with several other research institutes including the Richardson Pathological Laboratory at Queen's University.

Box 025 contains files on scarlet fever outbreaks amongst the Royal Canadian Air Force and other military personnel in bases across Ontario between 1941 and 1944. There are also more files of correspondence, notes, and reports, primarily from the 1930s and the early 1940s, on the development of scarlet fever antitoxin, on testing the effectiveness of penicillin in oil and wax in the treatment of gonorrhoea, and on the survival of streptococci and staphylococci in various products. The files from the 1950s relate largely to work on bacteria and viruses and to research methodology.

Box 026 contains the last general research files in this series. The correspondence, data, and reports are associated with a the development of compound 377. Sensitivity tests, clinical and drug trials were carried out at the Mountain Sanatorium in Hamilton, at the Toronto Hospital for Tuberculosis in Weston, and in London and Woodstock.

Personal and biographical

This series consists of a volume of Longfellow's poetry (last part, including back cover missing), with a bookplate with the coat-of-arms of the Williams family (Sir John Bickerton Williams, Kt., LLD, FSA), a certificate for the family plot in Mount Pleasant Cemetery (1916), a medical certificate for Edith (Bud) Williams from England (1927), and press clippings about her passion for mountain climbing (1962).

Tenure Documentation

This series contains two sets of documentation. The first compiled in 1976 when Prof. McIlwraith was applying for promotion to Assistant Professor. This documentation includes course files as described in Series 1 that complete this series for the years prior to 1976. Also included are copies of some of his early papers, reviews and talks often accompanied by an explanatory note meant to put the work in context to his entire output.

The second set of documentation is made up entirely of course related material, again with explanatory notes that most often fill the gap of similar course related files found in Series 1. This binder was amassed as part of the tenure review process to full professor in 1997.

Correspondence (Chronological)

Series consists of professional correspondence received from various individuals, governmental bodies, and organizations. Also included is a letter addressed to James Loudon, President of University College, written 1890’s.

Correspondence (Author)

Series consists of correspondence from colleagues and other individuals relating to McIlwraith’s research, teaching, and publishing. Included within the series is correspondence from Margaret Mead, letters related to his research on the Nuxalk Nation, as well as communication regarding a C.B.C. radio script with which he was involved.

Academic Lectures

Series consists of lectures delivered by McIlwraith while teaching at Cambridge University and the University of Toronto. Lectures cover a range of topics within anthropology and are directed to first-year students, third-year medical students, as well as including some graduate-level seminars.

Unpublished Manuscripts (Cambridge University)

Series consists of unpublished manuscripts written by McIlwraith during his time at Cambridge University. Titles focus on various African traditions and include The Influence of Egypt on African Death Ceremonies and On the Bola in Central Africa.

Book Reviews

Series consists of published book reviews written by McIlwaith. These include Songs of the Copper Eskimos, by Helen H. Roberts and Diamond Jenness, and The American Indian, by Hyatt Verrill”. For articles that are not listed by title, see Appendix B.

Research files

Over the years, Professor Skilling assembled a large number of research files which contained a great variety of material, including notes, correspondence, press clippings (especially from Czechoslovak, other Eastern European newspapers, and Canadian newspapers written in Czech), photocopies of articles, pamphlets, and books.

A selection of these research files has been retained in this series; the material not kept was turned over to members of the Skilling Seminar for their use. The files are grouped into several subject areas, following Professor Skilling’s arrangement and, for the most part, his file descriptions. The emphasis in selection was on original notes, heavily annotated items, correspondence, memoranda, drafts of papers and addresses, and material from conferences and seminars.

The first research area is on Czechoslovakia generally (1966-2000), with its files on the country’s political culture and political reform, political activists, and conferences [box 031]. The latter include the International Political Science Association roundtable in Zagreb in 1985, ‘Ten years after’ conference in Prague (1999), and the Forum 2000 conference in the same city. There is also material on the breakup of Czechoslovakia. Accompanying these files are two boxes [036, 037] of index card notes – one on Czech politics and one a bibliography of Czech politics.

The second category of files [boxes 033-034] consists of material gathered by Professor Skilling for his numerous writings about Tomas Masaryk, including his T. G. Masaryk: Against the current, published in English and Czech in 1994. The first part consists primarily of general writings about Masaryk, along with accompanying notes, correspondence, etc. The arrangement in the latter portion is by subject areas, of which the principal ones are: ‘the Slovak questions’, ‘the Jewish question’, ‘religion’, ‘the women’s question’ and ‘foreign policy’. Accompanying these files is a index card box of entries on Masaryk generally, on his writings, on works about him and on searches to be carried out [box 038, 038a and 038b].

The final category [box 035] relates to Vaclav Havel. In it is correspondence between him and Professor Skilling and copies of letters to Vilem Precan, along with files of interviews, addresses, and honours bestowed; Havel’s visits abroad (including the University of Toronto in 1990); his writings (with notes by Skilling), and material documenting his involvement with Charter 77.

Oversized material has been removed from /034(10) and (12) to /003(04), and from box 034(27) to box 003(05).

A poster has been removed from /035(23) to folder .(02).

Photoprints have been removed from /032(04) and (05) to box 009P(12).

Personal life

This series consists of personal items belonging to Professor Skilling, including address books, photographs and slides, an identification card, and his marriage certificate issued in Czechoslovakia (with corresponding Canadian documentation).

The photographs have been organized according to portraits, personal and family life, early school, professional life, and slides. The majority of the photographs are annotated and dated on the verso, and the slides are numbered and dated. Two photographs in “Professional life” [B2012-0005/001P(04)] that are not annotated or dated show Professor Skilling receiving an honorary degree (LL.D) from the University of Toronto in 1982. He is flanked by President James Ham and Chancellor George Ignatieff.

There are four newspaper clippings related to Professor Skilling. The first is a congratulatory message, possibly published in a newsletter issued by the West United Church, about Skilling having won The Gundy-Doran scholarship [dated between 1929-1934]. The second clipping is a photograph of Skilling and his Harbord Collegiate institute junior basketball team [ca. 1928-29]. The third clipping is an article entitled “Viet Nam situation called threat to unity” [1966]. Skilling is quoted and discussed at length in the article. The final clipping is a profile (in English) on H. Gordon Skilling, published in The Prague Post in 1994.

Correspondence

This series consists of personal correspondence between Professor Skilling and his family, friends and colleagues. Most of it is from the last 20 years of his life and relates primarily to his interest in central and east European affairs. Some of the correspondence is arranged chronologically – especially the letters covering the years 1991-2001. Also arranged chronologically and grouped separately are postcards and greeting cards with extensive messages for the years 1939-2001 (a few of the latter have photoprints attached). There are a few letters from Skilling to his parents and Sally from the 1940s, also correspondence with Derek Paton, a former student, and especially with his old Czech friends, Jelka and Olga Haningerova and Vilem Precan. There are also small files of correspondence on the Jan Hus Fund and the issue of public lending rights.

Journals and appointment books

In August of 1941, as Gordon Skilling left United College in Winnipeg for his first academic appointment in the United States, he began to keep a detailed journal of his activities. This journal was continued for the next fifteen years, until June of 1956, and covers the crucial period during which he established himself academically and became recognized as an authority on the Soviet Union and countries behind the Iron Curtain, especially Czechoslovakia.

It was an exciting and challenging time for him; the University of Wisconsin had a reputation as a dynamic liberal institution of higher learning. He arrived, however, just as the United States’ entered World War II amid a rising fear of communism (in spite of the need for co-operation with the Soviet Union, which Skilling advocated), both of which had an impact on the university and on him. From May 1943 until the end of the War, he was back in Canada as director of the CBC’s European short-wave radio broadcasts in its new International Service. On returning to Madison, he discovered a university in decline and his own position in doubt – he was denied promotion to associate professorship and tenure. So, in 1947 he left to accept an assistant
professorship at Dartmouth College in New Hampshire. He spent the summer of 1948 in Czechoslovakia, his first visit since 1939, where he witnessed first-hand the establishment of communist rule in the country and which he described in detail in his journal. Back in the United States a fellowship enabled him to study and research at Columbia. In 1950 he returned to Czechoslovakia to research the emerging system of communist rule there and to experience it through the new bureaucracy, the political show trials, and the constant stream of propaganda. In 1951 he was promoted to full professor in his department and was also given leave to return to the Russian Institute at Columbia for the 1952-1953 academic year. He found, however, that the anti-communist hysteria of the McCarthy era had an impact on his scholarly activities – two of his books were turned down – and on him personally. In 1955 he was questioned by an agent of the US immigration service, had to appear before a state anti-subversive committee. Shortly after the journal ends, Skilling’s green card was cancelled and he
was not permitted to leave the country, even for his brother Andy’s funeral, until he was issued a new visa in June 1958.

The remainder of the series consists of a broken run of appointment books and calendars for the following years (with number of copies in brackets): 1961, 1962, 1964, 1965, 1989, 1991 (2), 1992 (2), 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999 (2), 2000 (2), and 2001. The entries, though cryptic, provide the researcher with an overview of Professor Skilling’s activities at any one point or over a period of time.

Diaries and travel journals

Gordon Skilling began keeping diaries when he was a boy; the earliest includes accounts of trips to New York City and Montreal respectively in February and October 1921. These diaries, which described later trips to the United States and to Muskoka, continued until 1932, the entries between 1928 and 1932 being intermittent.

There is a gap of 36 years before the next journal begins. Between 1958 and the end of his life, Professor Skilling kept travel journals, relating especially to Czechoslovakia and other destinations in Eastern Europe. These are arranged chronologically, are often accompanied by supporting correspondence, programs and other items picked up along the way, and by photographs (see Series XI). The journals are usually described as ‘notebooks’, though many are in diary format. Professor Skilling often combined the diary format, with dated entries, with notes on what he had seen and with whom he had met, either in the same notebook or separately. These journals should be consulted in conjunction with the relevant chapters in his autobiography, The education of a Canadian, which helps put them in perspective.

University of Toronto

Professor le Riche joined the University in 1957 and served as head of Department of Epidemiology and Biometrics in the School of Hygiene from 1962-1975. With the dissolution of the School of Hygiene, he became a professor in the Department of Preventive Medicine and Biostatistics in the Faculty of Medicine. He retained that status until his retirement in 1982, when he was appointed Professor Emeritus.

The records in this series document Professor le Riche’s employment at and retirement from the University, along with some of his teaching and administrative activities. The series includes, among others, files relating to teaching of tropical medicine and epidemiology, the proceedings of a review committee on community health (1979-1980), a preliminary report on epidemiology prepared by the Research Advisory Committee working group on epidemiological studies (1984), correspondence with and about Dr. Andrew Rhodes, Director of School of Hygiene (1966-69), Faculty of Medicine committees generally (1957-1961), and admission criteria for medical students. There is also a file on the W. Harding le Riche Award in Medical Research at the University of Toronto.

Personal files

Includes files on:

  • Currculum vitae and biographical information ( -1992)
  • Correspondence
  • Poetry
  • Appointments (1927-1948)
  • Canadian citizenship (1953)
  • Education, University of Toronto (1949-1953)
  • Appointments (1953- )
  • Retirement (1983)
  • Honours and awards (1961-1990)

Publications

Series consists of a number of offprints and publications by Rappaport and others.

Professional organizations: general

Dr. McCulloch was involved with a number of Canadian, American and other international professional organizations. This series contains files mainly dealing with his involvement with the AIDS Steering Committee of the Royal Society of Canada. Other organizations include American Association for Cancer Research, Canadian Institute of Academic Medicine, International Society for Experimental Hematology, the Japan Prize, and the Royal Society.

Files include correspondence, minutes of meetings, reports, etc.

Administrative files: "Dead files"

This series contains files relating to studies and other activities for mainly government agencies of the Ontario provincial government, and the Canadian federal government as well as the National Institutes of Health in the United States. Canadian government bodies include the Department of National Defence, Department of National Health, and the National Cancer Institute of Canada, to name a few. For Ontario, files concern the Ontario Cancer Institute/Princess Margaret Hospital, and the Ontario Council of Health.

Addresses

In addition to his responsibilities as medical researcher, faculty member and author, Dr. McCulloch also was in demand as a speaker by many organizations. Among the sponsors of these talks and addresses were the CBC –TV program “The nature of things”, numerous national and international organizations for the study of cancer and haematology, Royal Society of Canada, and other universities. In the late 1980s many of this addresses dealt with AIDS research. Files in this series contain correspondence relating to the addresses given and/or drafts of the addresses themselves.

Professional activities: Council of Ontario Universities

The Council of Ontario Universities (COU) was formed on December 3, 1962 as the “Committee of Presidents of Provincially Assisted Universities and Colleges of Ontario,” with its current name being adopted in 1971. The mandate of the COU is to “build awareness of the university sector’s contributions to the social, economic and cultural well-being of the province and the country, as well as the issues that impact the sector’s ability to maximize these contributions.” It works with Ontario’s publicly assisted universities and one associate member institution, the Royal Military College of Canada. This series documents the activities of a number of its committees and task forces, which are detailed below, approximately in order of activity.

Professor Lang was a member of the COU’s Committee on Enrolment Statistics and Projections from 1976 to 1990. In 1982-1983 he sat on its Special Committee on BILD Administrative Procedures and from 1987 to 1991 was a member of its Research Advisory Group. In 1991 he was invited to be part of a small task force to present proposals to the government for an income contingent repayment plan for Ontario students. Throughout much of the 1990s, he was involved with the COU’s Committee on University Accountability and the Performance Indicators for the Public Postsecondary System in Ontario project, better known as the Performance Indicators Project, the purpose of which was to assess the overall Ontario postsecondary sector.

He was also a member of four task forces: Audit Guidelines (1998-2000), Secondary School Issues (1998-2005), Student Financial Assistance (2006-), and Quality Assurance (2008-2010).
The Task Force on Secondary School Issues was established to assess the evaluation of students in the new secondary school program of studies and to make recommendations regarding the monitoring of grading practices and standards.

The COU’s Quality and Productivity Task Force work was to outline “all the quality and productivity initiatives” undertaken to “showcase results for the government’s increased investment in universities.” Its report, presented in March 2006, was followed by the COU Task Force on Quality Measurements, chaired by David Naylor of the University of Toronto. It was charged with addressing the “broad issues related to quality measurement, developing the long-term strategies for COU’s work with the government and the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario (HEQCO).” [1]

Files in B2018-0001 include correspondence with U of T and COU colleagues, as well as further records related to his role on the COU’s Committee on University Accountability. Also included are further records about the COU's Task Force on Quality Assurance (2008-2010), including its subsequent transition and implementation phase.

The files in this series contain correspondence, memoranda, notes, minutes of meetings, drafts of reports, and assorted background reports and other documentation.

NOTES

  1. Task Force on Quality Measurement terms of reference, March 2006, in B2011-0003/043(03).

Professional activities (other)

This series documents professional activities other than those described in the two previous series. Included is material on consulting and special projects, boards of governors of educational institutions that Professor Lang sat on, and his association with a number of other educational agencies and groups in Canada and elsewhere. Of the last, the most documentation is on the Ontario Council on University Affairs, the Premier’s Council for Economic Renewal, and the Sweden/Ontario Bilateral Exchange Seminar for Senior Academic Administrators (1982-1983). The arrangement in this section is by name of organization or event.

The files may contain any combination of correspondence, memoranda, minutes of meetings, notes, and reports.

Files from B2018-0001 include further records documenting Lang’s active involvement with the Board of Trustees of the Toronto School of Theology (2008 - ; Chair, Institutional Evaluations Committee, 2014-2017) and the Board of Governors of Saint Augustine’s Seminary. His work as Chair of the Strategic Asset Study Committee (2011-2014) for the Archdiocese of Toronto is also documented.

Lectures and criticism

Frederic Urban gave a number of addresses as a visiting artist and lecturer. In 1979 he was a visiting artist at Ohio State University, where he photographed a number of student street performances. In October 1981 he was guest lecturer with the Venice Study Abroad Program run by the Department of Architecture at the University of Toronto. The following year he was a guest lecturer at University College in the University of Toronto for Larry Richard’s course, “Introduction to architecture”. In 1984 and 1985 he gave lectures
on his Sacri Monti project at Carleton University and the University of Toronto. In 1991 he
was a visiting lecturer at the University of Wisconsin at Stout. Some of the addresses are documented in this series. For related correspondence, see Series 2.

Professor Urban was a member of the Board of Directors of the Sharon Temple Museum Society from 1996 to 2001 and he and Larry were invited to participate in a series of readings and performances.

Results 301 to 350 of 1624