Showing 51779 results

Archival description
University of Toronto Archives and Records Management Services
Print preview View:

21 results with digital objects Show results with digital objects

Personal files

Includes files on:

  • Currculum vitae and biographical information ( -1992)
  • Correspondence
  • Poetry
  • Appointments (1927-1948)
  • Canadian citizenship (1953)
  • Education, University of Toronto (1949-1953)
  • Appointments (1953- )
  • Retirement (1983)
  • Honours and awards (1961-1990)

University-wide administration files

Subseries consists of university-wide administration files which include the Dean Search Committee, Connaught Committee, School of Graduate Studies Assistant to the Dean, Library Advisory Committee, Massey College Associate Fellow and the OISE Board of Governors. It also includes files relating to the Rendo Foundation, an Italian group negotiating to set up a special relationship with U of T, involving funding and research support for projects at U of T that fell through.

Personal records and early career

Series consists of records relating to Prof. Cameron's early career and personal life. Records pertaining to various positions held by Prof. Cameron (including at Trent University, the University of Toronto, and various government departments) include offers of employment, staff appointment forms, appraisal reports, salary revisions, training records, and correspondence.

Further records relating to Prof. Cameron's employment at Trent University include course syllabi and a copy of the Trent University Student newspaper, Arthur, (1976) with a cover story about an English Department scandal during Prof. Cameron's time as Trent's Dean of Arts and Science. Records relating to his time on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Canadian Studies (1982-1985) include minutes of the editorial board meeting.

Records classed as 'personal' primarily relate to professional matters of particular import (ex: appointments and promotions), and include correspondence, peer reviews, letters of reference, employment records, other people's CVs, congratulatory notes, and membership records. One file also includes a handwritten letter from Jane Jacobs. One file consists of a diary recording Prof. Cameron's time in England in 1966.

The first file in this series includes file lists and inventories of Prof. Cameron's records during various points in his career. These may be useful to researchers working with records in other series, as some documents are listed at the item level.

Series also includes 9 photographs: primarily posed portraits and a photograph of Prof. Cameron at the Conference on the University into the 21st century in May 1984.

Personal and general correspondence

This series contains general correspondence, curriculum vitae, letters of reference for clerical and professional staff broadly documenting his activities as teacher, administrator and author, as well as other professional activities. Correspondence files for example, relate to the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons, Providence Villa, and the University of Toronto Department of Medicine.

National Research Council

Series contains is composed of records dating from McKay’s time at the National Research Council. During the Second World War, the organization was mobilized to support the Allied war effort. As a result, most of the series’ records relate to military research and development. Canadian Army Operational Research Group (C.A.O.R.G.) reports compose approximately half the files that make up the series. These reports cover subjects ranging from blast measurements for anti-tank mine clearance to the number and distribution of Japanese paper balloons in North America. There are also two summary reports on Japanese balloon incidents.
The remainder of the textual and graphic records are made up of committee minutes, general Department of Defence documents, and a short paper on Canada’s part in the development of the radio proximity fuse, which McKay contributed to as assistant to project leader Professor Arnold Pitt.

Also included in this series are the remains of a Japanese paper balloon. Paper balloons, also known as balloon bombs, were a by-product of an atmospheric experiment by Axis scientists, which discovered a powerful air current traveling across the Pacific at about 30,000 feet [1]. Taking advantage of this knowledge, the Japanese military developed what may well have been the first intercontinental weapon in the form of explosive devices attached to paper balloons. These balloons were released in Japan and carried along the Pacific by a jet stream, ultimately finding their way to North America’s West Coast. Although the Japanese are thought to have released as many as 9,000 paper balloons, only 1,000 or so are thought to have reached North America, resulting in a total of six casualties [2].

NOTES

  1. Johnna Rizzo, “Japan’s secret WWII weapon: Balloon bombs,” National Geographic, 27 May 2013.
  2. Ibid.

Education and teaching files

This series contains annotated student handbooks, programmes for football and hockey games, and an issue of the Undergrad, all from Brian Land’s undergraduate years; course notes for an MLS college universities library administration course taught largely by Margaret Cockshutt in 1955-1956; a file Land compiled while chairing the constitution revision committee of the Alumni of the Library School (1954-1959); and lecture notes for two courses he gave in the Library School, Ontario College of Education (1961-1963); and correspondence relating to his appointment as its director (1964). There is a final file relating to his Labour Gazette indexing project for the federal Department of Labour (1956-1958).

Dr. Land kept only selected lecture notes. For others, see Series IV of B1993-0026.

Correspondence

This series encompasses four decades of Dr. Edward Safarian's professional correspondence. It covers his relationships with numerous professional associations and a range of professional activities including correspondence with publishers, academic colleagues and government agencies. The broad time frame of the series begins with Safarian's leaving graduate studies at the University of California for the Dominion Bureau of Statistics in Ottawa, his tenure as a professor at the University of Saskatchewan, and his later teaching and administrative activities at the University of Toronto. In addition, it illustrates his wide network of connections with universities across North America and around the world.

The bulk of the series is arranged chronologically by year. Following the chronological arrangement, there is a file of "personal" correspondence. This is followed by a grouping of professional correspondence arranged by Safarian according to specific subjects. Most relate to his ongoing interest in foreign investment in Canada and to the controversy surrounding the publication of The Struggle for Canadian Universities, edited by Robin Matthews and James Steele.

Some of this correspondence is in the nature of postcards and telegrams, and accompanying certain letters are notes, addresses, reports, and programmes.

Correspondence

Personal correspondence and some other private exchanges with individuals, covering a variety of issues and activities; numerous letters of reference are included. There is also a file on the seventh Table Ronde d’Économistes France-Canada, held in Paris, France, in 1991 and one on the honorary degree awarded to Arthur E. Child by the University of Toronto in 1984, at which Professor Safarian gave the citation. The files contain, in addition to correspondence, memoranda, notes, and drafts of reports and addresses. The arrangement is chronological and by name of event or individual.

General correspondence

This series is made up of general correspondence files, arranged alphabetically by the name of the correspondent or by the name of the person about whom Prof. McNeill is corresponding. Incoming and outgoing correspondence cover such areas as research, supervision of graduate students, editing of papers, trips, as well as numerous letters of reference for past students and colleagues seeking recommendations for appointments, tenure, awards and grants. Some correspondence relates to consultancy work such as files on the Ministry of the Solicitor General, Advanced Medical Systems, Inc., and Scintrex Ltd.. There is extensive correspondence with colleagues in Australia regarding his involvement in the development of a body compositional laboratory at Prince Henry Hospital in Melbourne.

The files often contain attached documentation to the correspondence. This is most often the case when corresponding with or about students under his supervision. Files may include drafts of thesis, research reports and Ph.D. oral assessments.

Personal files

This series contains biographical sketches compiled for internal University of Toronto purposes and for several biographical dictionaries (ca. 1960-1992), including a selection of photographs; a personal data file compiled by Professor Glass in July, 1986; certificates and diplomas for academic and honorary degrees and other awards (1947-1986); and press clippings (1977-1985).

Biographical file

This series is one file containing a copy of his birth certificate, a C.V., a Fellowship Leave Application, a publication list, and a biography written around 1976. Documents give a good overview of his career and achievements.

Personal /biographical

This series contains four files relating to personal and biographical information prepared by Dr. Baker. It includes curriculum vitae, brief biographical summary, correspondence relating to his appointment and salary at the University of Toronto, sabbatical leave in 1993, and personal correspondence.

Co-operative Housing Case Study: administration & correspondence

This series includes drafts and notes on the initial research proposal, including notes on their research strategy, possible funding, research team meetings and administrative working notes, as well as correspondence and notes regarding the review and evaluation of the research project by the Ministry of Urban Affairs. In addition, this series includes information about contract negotiations as well as a signed copy of the agreement among the Ministry of Urban Affairs, the principal researchers and the Governing Council of the university. The correspondence files include correspondence with the housing cooperative, the Centre for Urban and Community Development, and the Review Committee, Office of the Finally this series includes administrative files detailing personnel and budget and financial management of the research project.

Correspondence

This series contains 3 files of correspondence, in chronological order, with colleagues at both Canadian and foreign universities, publishers, government officials, and others. Four files document his honours and fellowships, his participation in honouring Professor Fred Lukerman of University of Minnesota and the awarding of a Ph.D based on his body of work, and with Andrew Reed. The file relating to honours for example provides documentation on the IGU Lauréat d’Honneur 2000, testimonials and other correspondence. A copy of his curriculum vitae will be found in file (04).

Early biographical information

The records in this series provide biographical information on Marion Walker’s early life, 1921-1942. Series includes 7 photographs. Subjects are: 5 portraits of Marion Walker; the Phi Beta sorority, 1940; and the University College graduating class, 1942. Also included is a scrapbook of newspaper clippings concerning Ms. Walker’s amateur golfing activities, 1937-1941.

Personal

This series consists of records relating primarily to Dr. McCarthy’s medical student days at the University of Toronto. The pages of prescription notes appear to have belonged to his maternal grandfather, A.W. Moffat.

Professional correspondence

Incoming and outgoing professional correspondence documenting Hawkin's research, teaching and public service activities. Included is correspondence while advising various government departments and ministries including Dept of Citizenship (1964-1967), Manpower and Immigration (1964-1970), Secretary of State (1989) and Canada Employment and Immigration Commission (1991-1992). There is also extensive correspondence with her publisher McGill-Queen's University Press which complements records found in Series III.

The correspondence is filed by subject or correspondent and files are arranged chronologically. At the end of this series there are draft outgoing letters contained in notebooks dating from 1989-1992 which relate mostly to her later work on "Asylum-Seekers" (See Series III).

Schedules

Consists of the Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Union senior hockey schedule, 1949-1950

Personal and education

This series contains material relating to Professor Goudge's personal life and his education at Dalhousie, the University of Toronto, and Harvard.

It begins with his personal journals for 1949-1950 and 1960-1972 and his "scrapbook" of quotations and poetry that he assembled in 1933.

Next is a file of course notes from his undergraduate program at Dalhousie (1930-31) and a copy of Pharos for his graduating year (1931). They are followed by research papers (1935, 1936) from his doctoral program at the University of Toronto, including the one on C. S. Peirce (1936) that became his doctoral dissertation; and course notes from the spring term at Harvard (1937), where he studied aesthetics under Professors David W. Prall, metaphysics under W. E. Hocking and Aristotle under J. D. Wild. The notes he took from A. N. Whitehead on cosmology and the function of reason have not been located.

Personal files

This series contains material documenting the personal side of Dr. Hastings’ life. It begins with genealogical and biographical information about and articles regarding Hastings and his family, followed by copies of his curriculum vitae (1961-1994). Other items include his baby book (1928), membership cards and memorabilia, and miscellaneous writings. There is a file of badges and certificates from the Royal Life Saving Society and files on awards and honours, in particular from the Pan American Health Organization, the University of Toronto alumni, and the Canadian Public Health Association. There are several files on trips, beginning when Hastings was a teenager, and on the deaths of his parents.

The larger part of this series consists of daybooks documenting Dr. Hastings’ activities between 1955 and 1967. These take the form of quarterly volumes, a few of which are missing. There are also a number of casual and formal photographs of Dr. Hastings and slides of his father’s funeral. The arrangement of the daybooks and the photographs is chronological.

An electronic version of Dr. Hastings' CV is attached (in pdf)

Textual records

Consists of memorabilia belonging to various members of the Wrong and Blake families including Harold Wrong, Murray Wrong and Gerald Blake. There are items relating to Ridley College (1906, 1923), to the Kappa Alpha Society (1911-1916), as well as two booklets of poems: 1) Verses by Harold Wrong, and 2) By-Products 1911-1919 by Murray Wrong. As well, there are there two pieces of correspondence written by Gerald Blake from the front during World War I.

Alexander Brady sous-fonds

Consists of files from the personal records of Alexander Brady, that Professor Wallace, a colleague and executor of his estate, had retained in her possession following his death. She has added some of her files about Professor Brady and many of the annotations throughout are hers.

Brady, Alexander

Personal and early education

This series contains Ivey’s essays, laboratory notebooks, theses (MA and Ph.D.) produced during his university education at the University of British Columbia (BA 1944; MA 1946), and graduate studies at the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Indiana. Personal correspondence, notices, newspaper clippings, resume and biographical information are also included relating mainly to his career as professor of physics and administrator at the University of Toronto.

Commission of Enquiry into the affairs of King's College University and Upper Canada College

Series consists of volumes encompassing the work of the Commissioners of Inquiry into the Affairs of King's College University and Upper Canada College, who carried out their
duties between 1848 and 1851.

Three commissioners were originally appointed, John Wetenhall, Joseph Workman, and Robert Easton Burns. Burns succeeded Wetenhall as chairman in March of 1850 and he and Workman completed the work of the Commission. Workman was the most active, attending 191 meetings in all and conducting 313 visits. The other commissioners together attended 213 meetings and conducted 21 visits.

Of the two copies of the report that were compiled, one was eventually retained by Workman, along with the supporting documentation. These volumes were inherited by his daughter and, upon her death, were discovered in the family papers by Professor Cecil Fairfield Lavell who had married one of Dr. Workman's granddaughters. Professor Lavell, of Grinell College, Iowa, had earlier done graduate work at the University of Toronto. Professor and Mrs. Lavell presented the volumes to the University in 1922 and 1923.

Personal and biographical

The contents of this series consists ‘biographical notes’, copies of Professor Richards curriculum vitae (1966-2004), and articles about him; files on the family tree and the death of his father from ALS; an address book, certificates and honours; memorabilia belonging both to him and his partner, Frederic (Fred) Urban; personal correspondence (primarily with family members and friends but including files on other personal matters and American politicians, including Edward Kennedy and Bill Clinton); some of Frederic’s personal correspondence; files on the various residences that he and Frederic have shared since 1967, including their house in Natchitoches, Louisiana; postcards and greeting cards; a notebook on dreams; day planners; a diary for the first six months of 1959; and journals, correspondence and notes for trips to Europe, various destinations in the United States, and the Far East between 1977 and 2007. The series ends with a collection of items on James Dean, who grew up on a farm a few miles from the Richards place and about whom Professor Richards wrote several pieces. Included are a number of photographs.

Administrative files

Sub-series pertains to Dr. Farrar’s administrative responsibilities at the New Jersey State Hospital and includes correspondence and reports.

Textual records

This series documents Dr. Farrar’s work with the Canadian Federal Department of Soldier’s Civil Re-establishment. In 1916, Dr. Farrar joined the Canadian army. Initially posted to a hospital unit in Kingston, Ontario, he was transferred to Ottawa for duty in the Military Hospitals Commission. Dr. Farrar would eventually become Chief Psychiatrist in the Federal Department of Soldier’s Civil Re-establishment. In this capacity, he treated invalided soldiers suffering from psychiatric illnesses including shell shock. Though primarily based in Ottawa during the war, Dr. Farrar also worked out of the military hospital in Cobourg, Ontario, a photograph of which can be found in /003P(11). Records in this series consist of professional correspondence, reports, patient files, plans for a military hospital. There are also lantern slides depicting hospitals and asylums throughout North America in the early 1900s. It is believed that Dr. Farrar may have collected and used these images in his capacity as Chief Psychiatrist to put forth a proposal for a new military hospital.

Results 301 to 350 of 51779