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University of Toronto Archives and Records Management Services
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Personal and general correspondence

This series contains general correspondence, curriculum vitae, letters of reference for clerical and professional staff broadly documenting his activities as teacher, administrator and author, as well as other professional activities. Correspondence files for example, relate to the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons, Providence Villa, and the University of Toronto Department of Medicine.

Personal records and early career

Series consists of records relating to Prof. Cameron's early career and personal life. Records pertaining to various positions held by Prof. Cameron (including at Trent University, the University of Toronto, and various government departments) include offers of employment, staff appointment forms, appraisal reports, salary revisions, training records, and correspondence.

Further records relating to Prof. Cameron's employment at Trent University include course syllabi and a copy of the Trent University Student newspaper, Arthur, (1976) with a cover story about an English Department scandal during Prof. Cameron's time as Trent's Dean of Arts and Science. Records relating to his time on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Canadian Studies (1982-1985) include minutes of the editorial board meeting.

Records classed as 'personal' primarily relate to professional matters of particular import (ex: appointments and promotions), and include correspondence, peer reviews, letters of reference, employment records, other people's CVs, congratulatory notes, and membership records. One file also includes a handwritten letter from Jane Jacobs. One file consists of a diary recording Prof. Cameron's time in England in 1966.

The first file in this series includes file lists and inventories of Prof. Cameron's records during various points in his career. These may be useful to researchers working with records in other series, as some documents are listed at the item level.

Series also includes 9 photographs: primarily posed portraits and a photograph of Prof. Cameron at the Conference on the University into the 21st century in May 1984.

Education and Personal Activities

The series partially documents Francess Halpenny’s education received at Maxville Sunday School in 1927 ; at the Public Schools of the Counties of Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry in 1928 ; and at the Oakwood Collegiate Institute, from 1931 to 1936. It also partially documents her undergraduate education, from 1937 to 1940, (B.A. in English literature) and her graduate studies (M.A. English literature) at the University of Toronto, in 1940 and 1941. The series documents the friendship between Francess Halpenny and Elizabeth and Jennifer Harper, between 1983 and 1986 ; Halpenny’s participation to social events, such as the dinner for 40th wedding anniversary of Morley and Clara Thomas in 1982, a dinner at Rideau Hall in 1983 and an evening in honour of Floyd S. Chalmer, Jean A. Chalmer and John Beckwith in 1984.

The series consists of 7 files including certificates and diplomas, course notes, Faculty of Arts Class and Prize Lists, correspondence and press clippings. It also includes one letter received from J. Mavor Moore, 16 October 1989 regarding Halpenny’s course notes he had kept from the University years ; a certificate of Honour Award received in recognition of her contribution to the undergraduate life at the University of Toronto, 7 June 1940 ; personal correspondence received after a period of illness in 1984 ; the address she gave at J. Russell Harper funeral and his obituary for the Royal Society of Canada.

Personal and biographical

This series consists of a volume of Longfellow's poetry (last part, including back cover missing), with a bookplate with the coat-of-arms of the Williams family (Sir John Bickerton Williams, Kt., LLD, FSA), a certificate for the family plot in Mount Pleasant Cemetery (1916), a medical certificate for Edith (Bud) Williams from England (1927), and press clippings about her passion for mountain climbing (1962).

Correspondence

In-coming as well as out-going correspondence was arranged by Lee in various runs. Filed at the beginning is a chronological series of files containing letters from 1967-1972. One file contains job offers from various universities in 1969-70 while another file relates to correspondence around his job offer at the University of Toronto. Apart from job offers, most of the correspondence is with colleagues world wide and is of both a professional and personal nature. Much of the early correspondence relates to field trips to the Kalahari and related research.

The second run of files is general alphabetical files with correspondence dating from about 1970 to 1975. Again this correspondence relates mainly to Prof. Lee’s research and is from colleagues and students. It includes comments on his publications and routine requests for information and advice, requests to attend seminar and talks and other professional meetings, as well as Prof. Lee’s reports or comments as a peer reviewer of papers. There are also letters of recommendation, reviews of theses and general correspondence documenting his role as a teacher.

A third run is an alphabetical run of files arranged by the correspondent. Correspondence is similar in nature to the general alphabetical files described above but is more voluminous for each person and covers a time period mainly from 1965-1975 with the bulk dating from the late 1960s to 1972. Included is correspondence with well known anthropologists such as Carl Heider (Brown University / University of Southern California), Adam Kuper (University College, London), Mary Leakey, Sidney Mintz (Yale University), Julian Steward (Colombia / University of Illinois), Sherwood Washburn (Harvard University and Lee’s advisor) and Eric Wolf (City University of New York).

Finally, Prof. Lee himself arranged a small run of correspondence files from famous people or people influential in his professional development. They include people such as Margaret Atwood and Carl Sagan as well as fellow anthropologists Philip Tobias and Bruce Trigger.

In addition to the correspondence from the 2007 donation, there is a grouping of correspondence from the 2012 addition. This is arranged alphabetically by correspondent, with occasional subject file as designated by Lee. Many of the earlier correspondents appear in this section again.

Davidson and Margaret Black sous-fonds

This sous-fonds consists of correspondence, primarily between Davidson Black and Margaret Delamere, from the time of their engagement in 1878 until his death eight years later, but also letters of congratulation to Margaret from family and friends on her engagement. The arrangement is by names of the correspondents or groups of them. There is also a tintype photograph of their children, Redmond and Davidson, taken in 1886.

Black, Davidson, Sr.

Family and personal

This series contains material relating to the le Riche family generally, to specific members of it – Harding le Riche’s, mother, siblings, wife, children, and grandchildren, personal information about le Riche himself, and his scrapbooks. The files on Professor le Riche contain biographical information, curriculum vitae, and press coverage of his activities, along with files on honours bestowed, memorabilia, a riding accident, and his trip to South Africa in 1964. B2006-0004/004 contains several certificates of awards both loose and in a large album. This series also includes family documents from 1888-1930s. (B2006-0004/001)

The largest single component of this series is the scrapbooks. They contain press clipping of items of family, academic, and political interest, programmes for and invitations to social and professional events, some photographs, the occasional letter, a large number of first day covers, and memorabilia relating to Professor le Riche’s travels and other activities. The first scrapbook (1945-1946) is filed in B2003-0012/001; the later scrapbooks (1964-1966, 1967-1973, 1973-1978, and 1978-1986) are filed in B2003-0012/002 to /005. Scrapbook for 1966-1968 is filed in B2006-0004/004. Loose items associated with scrapbooks dating from 1967 to 1986 are filed in folders in B2003-0012/ 001, /004 and /005, as appropriate.

The series concludes with an album of 9 records, titled “Beyond Antiquity: A series of lectures on the origins of man by Professor Raymond Dart, Professor Emeritus, University of the Witswatersrand, Johnannesburg, South Africa”, with an accompanying printed outline of the lectures. The series was produced by the South African Broadcasting Corporation in 1966, and le Riche was a contributor to it. Raymond Dart had been a professor of anatomy at Wits when le Riche was a student there, and was just beginning his career as an anthropologist. Le Riche was already interested in the subject and some of his friends visited the Sterkfontein caves in August 1936 with Robert Broom, the country’s leading paleontologist, who, a few days later, discovered the first Australopithecus at the site. Dart became famous for his description of the Taung skull, Australopithecus africannus.

Manuscripts and publications

This series consists of Professor Helleiner’s numerous publications and unpublished manuscripts spanning his career during the 1920s and 30s as an archivist in St. Pölten, Austria, and throughout the over 30 years he was an economic historian at the University of Toronto. Records include off-prints of the majority of his publications appearing in European and North American academic journals; unpublished manuscripts and notes; drafts of his books The Imperial Loans: A Study in Financial and Diplomatic History and Free Trade and Frustration: Anglo-Austrian Negotiations 1860-70; chapters in books he edited or contributed to; and numerous review articles and book reviews. Files in this series have been arranged chronologically, with book reviews arranged separately in 8 files at the end of the series.

Research files (general)

This series consists of the general files that Mr. Grenville assembled in his attempt to write Dr. Solandt’s story. It begins with a variety of biographical information on Dr. Solandt, including curriculum vitae, tributes and obituaries, his memorial service, press clippings, and an article about him. This is followed by grant applications, a project outline, correspondence, and files on sources, family history, and Dr. Solandt’s activities (including summaries of diaries), arranged alphabetically. The principal areas of activity covered are the atomic bomb/nuclear weapons, Canadian National Railway, Defence Research Board, forestry, medical research, operational research, the Science Council of Canada, and ‘voyaguers’. The photographs associated with some of the files have been removed and stored separately.

Administrative files

Sub-series pertains to Dr. Farrar’s administrative responsibilities at the New Jersey State Hospital and includes correspondence and reports.

Textual records

This series documents Dr. Farrar’s work with the Canadian Federal Department of Soldier’s Civil Re-establishment. In 1916, Dr. Farrar joined the Canadian army. Initially posted to a hospital unit in Kingston, Ontario, he was transferred to Ottawa for duty in the Military Hospitals Commission. Dr. Farrar would eventually become Chief Psychiatrist in the Federal Department of Soldier’s Civil Re-establishment. In this capacity, he treated invalided soldiers suffering from psychiatric illnesses including shell shock. Though primarily based in Ottawa during the war, Dr. Farrar also worked out of the military hospital in Cobourg, Ontario, a photograph of which can be found in /003P(11). Records in this series consist of professional correspondence, reports, patient files, plans for a military hospital. There are also lantern slides depicting hospitals and asylums throughout North America in the early 1900s. It is believed that Dr. Farrar may have collected and used these images in his capacity as Chief Psychiatrist to put forth a proposal for a new military hospital.

Personal

This series spans the whole of Claude Bissell’s adult life as well as some documents related to his early education. Biographical notes, memorabilia, honours and awards give a good overview of his achievements and personal milestones.

German academic life

Subseries consists of records relating to Dr. Franklin’s early academic life (as Ursula Maria Martius) when she was studying experimental physics at the Technical University of Berlin. Records include academic correspondence, drafts of her PhD thesis, “Die Anregung von Leuchtstoffen mit Gammastrahlen und Röntgenstrahlen verschiedener Wellenlänge” (1948), as well as the academic work of some of her colleagues, including Immanuel Broser, Hartmut Kallmann and R. Warminsky.

University education

Dr. Careless earned his B.A. in 1940 from the University of Toronto and his A.M. in 1941 and Ph.D. in 1950 from Harvard University. The records in this series pertain to Dr. Careless’ undergraduate and graduate education. Records consist of Dr. Careless’ undergraduate student notebook [1936?], three undergraduate history term papers (1939-1940) and his B.A. diploma (1940). Also included is his 1950 Harvard Ph. D. diploma and a draft of his doctoral dissertation, “Mid Victorian Liberalism in Canada: George Brown and the Toronto Globe, 1850-1867”.

Alexander Brady sous-fonds

Consists of files from the personal records of Alexander Brady, that Professor Wallace, a colleague and executor of his estate, had retained in her possession following his death. She has added some of her files about Professor Brady and many of the annotations throughout are hers.

Brady, Alexander

Personal and early education

This series contains Ivey’s essays, laboratory notebooks, theses (MA and Ph.D.) produced during his university education at the University of British Columbia (BA 1944; MA 1946), and graduate studies at the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Indiana. Personal correspondence, notices, newspaper clippings, resume and biographical information are also included relating mainly to his career as professor of physics and administrator at the University of Toronto.

Development of the questionnaire

This subseries contains records documenting the development of Ms. Heaton's questionnaire and includes correspondence, research proposals, in addition to draft and final copies of the survey.

Quakers: General

Subseries documents Dr. Franklin’s involvement with the Quaker community, as a member of Toronto Monthly Meeting and as a clerk of the Peace Committee of the Canadian Friends Service Committee (CFSC).

Activities documented include campaigns for disarmament, the Cruise Missile Conversion Project, attempts to set up a Quaker Study Centre at King City, demonstrations at the radar base of La Macaza, briefing the Lamarsh Commission, and many more. Records include minutes from the General Meetings and Peace Committees, material related to various CFSC conferences, gatherings, and institutes, papers and reports, media coverage, public education literature, briefs, newsletters, and correspondence.

The series also includes records relating to the operation by Canadian Quakers of the Peace Centre on Grindstone Island in the Rideau Lakes. This includes documents internal to the Quaker operation and the work of the peace education secretary Murray Thomson. According to Dr. Franklin, much of the work around the Grindstone Island programs was controversial, not only with respect to Canadian public opinion, but also within certain more traditional elements of the Quaker community. Records relating to Grindstone Island include minutes, internal documents, reports, programs and photographs. Included is also Thirty-one Hours, the printed transcript of the 1965 Summer Institute on Non-Violence, which was an exercise in non-violence. The transcript is an important original document of the responses of a pacifist community to a real and life-threatening attack.

Berlin

Series consist of records and publications relating to Dr. Franklin’s trip to Berlin as an observer at the World Peace Congress. This was her first trip back to Berlin after her departure in the late 1940s. Series includes a typed article (address to friends), detailing her thoughts on the visit, a notebook, the Assembly program, and books, booklets and brochures collected while in Berlin. Subseries also includes 2 commercial slide collections (produced in 1965): one of Berlin and one of Potsdam.

Papers

Subseries consists of papers written by Dr. Franklin for academic journals, magazines and books on a wide range of subjects, including physics, materials science, engineering, pacifism, politics, technology, feminism and education. Also includes some editorials written for newspapers. A list of publications (1950-1980) can be found in file B2015-0005/034(06). Files consist primarily of final copies of articles, although a few files do contain drafts and correspondence.

Personal and family

This series begins with two family monographs that Professor Shaw wrote: The Chicago Winterbothams and the Boston Shaws, 1880 to 2005 (Toronto, 2005) and that of his wife, Maria, Diaspora and Confluence: the Coutroubaki-Hazzidaki Families, c. 1850-2009 (Toronto, 2009). In Accession B2011-0007, there is also a file of correspondence from Joseph Shaw to his parents, Rue and Alfred, dated 1959-1970, including photographs from his army days and his first excavation at Kenchreai. The rest of the series consists of diaries.o

The diaries in this series (Professor Shaw variously dubbed them “diaries” and “daybooks”) begin in 1960 and end on 9 October 2008. Keeping diaries was a habit he picked up from his father. He stated “the reason for writing them was partly confessional, but also because most people, aside from myself, wouldn't care…But also digestion, for once something is absorbed consciously, that material may lead to other thoughts, even to discoveries about oneself, others, the world” [1]. Not every year is represented as Professor Shaw did not write them for some years, as in the early 1960s, and during 2003 when he was ill. The diaries contain, in addition to written entries, sketches of certain archaeological excavations, photographs (most tipped in but some loose), press clippings, letters, notes, inscriptions in Greek and some translations thereof, poems, and even drawings by his children. The photographs largely document personal and family activities and include some images of Professor Shaw as young man in 1950 (see diary for 17 June 1978 – 11 June 1979). There are some photographs of his archaeological work but not necessarily in the volumes related to the specific sites mentioned below.

NOTES

  1. E-mail to Harold Averill from Joseph Shaw, 1 February 2010.

Personal

Records in this series are diverse in nature and include everything from curriculum vitae, newspapers clippings, correspondence, awards, transcripts of interviews, memorabilia and biographical write-ups. All contain some biographical information about Prof. Gotlieb that outline his achievements, activities, honours and interests. Included in this series is an interview on CBC Radio, “Morningside” with Peter Gzowski in Sept 1994 (See /001S).

Biographical and personal files

This series contains a biographical sketch of Satterly written by H.L. Welsh; family and professional correspondence; press clippings; letters to the editor; family documents including birth and marriage certificates; obituary notices; clippings, memorabilia, and photoprints relating to Devon, England and its history; postcards, and photoprints. A heavily annotated Bible belonging to Dr. G. M. W. Carey is also included in this series.

Records from all four accessions are found in this series.

Correspondence

General incoming and outgoing correspondence, mainly related to Harris' research interests. Included is correspondence documenting his involvement in the Association of Professors of Higher Education as well as files relating to the University Ombudsman, the history of McGill University, the University Archives and others.

Writing and publishing

Series consists of writing and published material produced by Prof. Gunderson. Records primarily reflect his research on gender-based pay equity and income distribution. Series is comprised of offprints and copies, in addition to one file that includes correspondence and commentary on his writing.

Personal life and career

Series consists of records relating to Prof. Ng’s student personal life and career, including papers written as a UBC student, notes relating to her PhD oral presentation and thesis, and contracts with the Women and Gender Studies Institute. There is also one file of correspondence, notes, course syllabi and other records relating to Prof. Ng’s trip to New Zealand to work with members of the Department of Women’s Studies at the University of Waikato and visit with other scholars.

Series also includes 2 photographs of Prof. Ng.

Biographical

This series consists of biographical information and certificates [one is oversized] relating to Dr. Patterson's academic studies at the University of Alberta and the University of Toronto.

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