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Talks

This series consists of one file only on talks given on the University of Toronto Library to Paul Fox’s class in political science (1a and 1b) when Prof. Land was Assistant Librarian.

Education

This series documents Professor Sim’s university education, beginning with examination results at Wah Yan College, the English-system school run by the Jesuits in Hong Kong, where he spent two years improving his English before entering the University of Hong Kong in 1938. His notes at the latter, for Engineering courses in algebra, applied and pure mathematics and physics, survived the vicissitudes of war, but those for Medicine, to which he switched in the fall of 1940, did not. The files for Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy courses at the University of Washington (1946-1949) include course notes for only two courses (in French), some essays on his experiences during World War II and his coming to the United States, short essays on scientists, his BScPhm thesis, and a file on the 50th anniversary (1999) reunion of his class. Also present are copies of his Masters and Doctoral theses, a notebook on extractions and assays, a spoof on a technical paper, and an essay on his impressions of America. There are also files documenting his state pharmacist licence, which he obtained in 1951 and maintained until 1980, and on the course in pharmacognosy he taught while finishing his thesis and about which he later wrote.

Included in this series is a photo album of Professor Sim’s years at the University of Washington and a number of files of loose photos for the years 1947-1955 of him in his residences, his lab, with friends and colleagues and on vacation.

Professional and scientific organizations

Of the professional and scientific associations listed in the biographical sketch on Professor Sim, only the Canadian Pharmaceutical Association and the American Society of Pharmacognosy are included in this series. There are also slim files on the Association of Deans of Pharmacy of Canada, the Association of Faculties of Pharmacy of Canada, and the Pharmacy Examining Board of Canada. Accompanying the textual records are photographs of meetings American Society of Pharmacognosy and the Canadian Pharmaceutical Association.

Photographs

Photographs document Prof. Stephen K. Sim ,first Chinese professor in the Faculty of Pharmacy at the University of Toronto. Includes photos taken at conferences, with professional group such as the American Society of Pharmacognosy (1964-1965) and the Canadian Pharmaceutical Society (1958), Prof. Sim at UBC in the and the University of Washington 1950s, informal snapshots of colleagues as well as many documenting the Sims family. There is also one oversize portrait of the 1961 Undergraduate Pharmaceutical Society Executive at the University of Toronto.

Correspondence

This series includes correspondence, including: correspondence with colleagues and friends, such as Pelham Edgar, Edward Killoran Brown, Martha Eugenie Perry, and Desmond Pacey; correspondence with his wife, Viola Pratt (1924-1955), and his daughter, Claire Pratt (1933–1959); correspondence with family members, including brothers James Charles Spurgeon [Jim] and Calvert Coates [Cal] Pratt; and birthday cards and telegrams

Previously recorded but missing: 2 outgoing letters to Peggy Brown, dated 1951 (originals with photocopies); 1 incoming letter from C.A. Chant. dated 1940 (photocopy); 1 incoming letter from James Reaney, dated 1954 (photocopy); various letters from Brother Conrad

Pratt, Edwin Dove John

Editing

This series documents Gotlieb's activities on editorial advisory boards, as a referee, consultant and/or editor. It includes documentation on several publications, including the Annals of the History of Computing, the Journal of Computing and Society, Utilitas Mathematicas as well as several encyclopedias. There is also one general file relating to a variety of editorial projects. Not included in this series, are the papers related to his role in editing the publications of ACM. These records can be found in Series IV.

The files may contain correspondence, referee reports, submissions of papers, biographies of contributors, minutes and meeting agenda.

Research

This series documents Gotlieb's early research, mainly in the use of computers to develop timetables. Gotlieb's interest in this area of computer application evolved from a very practical need to revamp the Arts and Science Timetable in early 1960s, a task he was assigned as a young professor. Through the 1960s, he gave many papers on the subject and his expertise was recognized internationally. However, overtime, his interests led elsewhere and his time table research was passed on to another generation of computer scientists. He is recognized internationally for laying the groundwork in this area of computer applications. There are eight files on this research containing correspondence, reports, notes and related papers.

There is also one file relating to early research on computers and music. This master’s thesis research by student Jim Gabura had as its goal to successfully develop software that could recognize music by specific composers. The file contains original research, papers, correspondence, research reports and other related material. There is also the original cassette of taped music used in the research titled as "Appendix 6 -- Recordings" (For access see /002S). This research was being done in the early 1960s.

In the early 1980s, Gotlieb participated in the Bell Canada VISTA project, a videotex system that allowed users to access computer stored information on a modified television screen. This was more or less an early attempt at a communication system like the Internet. Included is correspondence, the original agreement, notes and publications documenting the experiment. There are also slides showing what the screens of information looked like. (For access see /001P(38)-(39).

There is one other graduate project documented in this series. This is the research by student Darrell Parsons (Ph.D. 1990) looking into the use of computers as it relates to productivity in banking. This thesis research was eventually published in the Journal of Productivity Analysis as “Productivity and Computers in Canadian Banking”, by Darrell Parsons, Calvin C. Gotlieb and Michael Denny, 1993. A copy of the paper, along with correspondence, research outlines and proposals can be found in the last file of this series.

Ceremonies and obligation lists

This series includes copies of addresses and poems used in homilies during the Ritual, obligation booklets, obligation lists for special ceremonies, statistics on obligated engineers and collected correspondence concerning the preparations for the inaugural ceremonies. Several files also include information on special ceremonies for older candidates and proposed special ceremonies that did not occur.

Material from accession B1995-0040 (1959-1989) also includes a copy of the ceremony book for Camp Wardens, application forms and considerable material concerning the manufacture and distribution of iron rings, as well as preparations made for campus ceremonies. Material from Accession B2009-0029 includes six files (06-11) containing updated ceremony booklets and guidelines, a certificate for the nomination of an Honorary Camp Warden, several speeches and a candidate list. Files are arranged chronologically. White prints, several photographs and two obligation sheets have been removed for separate storage.

Expansion of the ritual

The series contains primarily correspondence with Camps Two through Nine, much of it dealing with the matter of verifying candidate credentials from different jurisdictions. There is also some correspondence of a social nature related to the establishment of authorities and Camp Wardens in new jurisdictions. The system of record keeping by Camp appears to have stopped in 1954, after which correspondence pertaining to the Camps may be found in the individual correspondence files in series 5. Arrangement is by Camp number, followed by the records pertaining to discussions of expanding the Ritual to the United Kingdom, India and the United States.

Camp Ten records pertain to a proposed camp in Ottawa, which was never established. Camp Ten, when it was established, became the camp for the Université Laval in Québec City in 1956. Camp Twelve was established by Carleton University in Ottawa in 1958. The B1995-0040 accession includes one file of material, from 1978-1987, related to the expansion of the “Links” programme of the Order of the Engineer organization, based in the United States. The records for Camp Five contain an example of an early iron ring.

National Research Council

Series contains is composed of records dating from McKay’s time at the National Research Council. During the Second World War, the organization was mobilized to support the Allied war effort. As a result, most of the series’ records relate to military research and development. Canadian Army Operational Research Group (C.A.O.R.G.) reports compose approximately half the files that make up the series. These reports cover subjects ranging from blast measurements for anti-tank mine clearance to the number and distribution of Japanese paper balloons in North America. There are also two summary reports on Japanese balloon incidents.
The remainder of the textual and graphic records are made up of committee minutes, general Department of Defence documents, and a short paper on Canada’s part in the development of the radio proximity fuse, which McKay contributed to as assistant to project leader Professor Arnold Pitt.

Also included in this series are the remains of a Japanese paper balloon. Paper balloons, also known as balloon bombs, were a by-product of an atmospheric experiment by Axis scientists, which discovered a powerful air current traveling across the Pacific at about 30,000 feet [1]. Taking advantage of this knowledge, the Japanese military developed what may well have been the first intercontinental weapon in the form of explosive devices attached to paper balloons. These balloons were released in Japan and carried along the Pacific by a jet stream, ultimately finding their way to North America’s West Coast. Although the Japanese are thought to have released as many as 9,000 paper balloons, only 1,000 or so are thought to have reached North America, resulting in a total of six casualties [2].

NOTES

  1. Johnna Rizzo, “Japan’s secret WWII weapon: Balloon bombs,” National Geographic, 27 May 2013.
  2. Ibid.

Manuscripts and publications

Series contains manuscripts and publications that McKay either wrote or kept in his files. Although the majority of pieces address scientific matters, the series also includes a Junior Prize Essay (“Fathers Versus Sons”) that McKay wrote while still in high school. A number of pieces, including the aforementioned “Fathers Versus Sons,” are to be found in journals or magazines, which have been included in the fonds both so as to preserve context and because many of them are no longer in print. It is worth noting that four of the articles in the series were coauthored, rather than sole-authored, by McKay. These are: “The Decay of Nitrogen Afterglow,”
“”The Decay of the Populations of Metastable Atoms and Ions from the Same D-C. Discharge in Neon,” “Effect of Previous History on Switching Rate in Ferrites,” and “The Hall Effect and Resistivity in Tellurium.” The series also includes McKay’s PhD dissertation, The Measurement of the Dialectric Constant of Electrolytes, and the high school physics textbook he co-authored with D.G. Ivey and which his sister, Marjorie, illustrated.

Problem sets and examinations

The problem sets in this series were used by Satterly while teaching at the University of Toronto. The files are arranged in chronological order by academic year and term. Annotated examinations are scattered throughout the records. A personal bound copy of all of Satterly's examinations is filed at thend of this series and includes an introductory note him. These examinations are often heavily annotated. At the end of this series are a number of files of a more general nature on miscellaneous mathematical problems.

Records from two of the four accessions are found in this series.

Academic activity and teaching

Series consists of administrative and personal records generated by Dr. Galloway. Series includes records of his teaching activity at McGill University and the University of Toronto, research leave proposals, academic exchanges, and funding requests.

Research

The files in this series consist of an album of reproductions of drawings of archaeological excavations and surveys carried out by Professor Shaw between 1963 and 1966, especially at Zakros, Kenchreai, Gordion, and Corinth. Some of these were reproduced in his articles and used in talks at conferences. There are also files of correspondence, notes, background material and photographs relating to research relating to the Phoenicians in the eastern Mediterranean, especially in Sicily, Sardinia and Greece, including Crete and Messara. Files from Accession B2011-0007 contain staff lists and excavation schedules for Kommos excavations.

The descriptions of the folders and the volume of drawings are those provided by Professor Shaw.

University of Toronto. McLuhan Program in Culture and Technology

Marshall McLuhan suffered a stroke during the summer of 1979 and, when it became apparent that he could not continue his duties as Director of the Centre for Culture and Technology, the University decided he should retire (he was 68). He died on 31 December, 1980, six months after the University closed the Centre he had created. This decision created an enormous public outcry.

The closure of the Centre resulted from the report of a review committee which recommended that, in the absence of Dr. McLuhan, it be reconstituted as the McLuhan Program in Culture and Technology within the School of Graduate Studies. The Program would establish "a program of research and scholarship which would extend and preserve the work and ideas of Marshall McLuhan in the area of culture and technology." The committee also recommended that the Program be governed by a board of directors, that the University provide the financial resources for the Program, and that it be subject to periodic review.

Dr. Gotlieb was one of the founding members of the Board in 1982. The University's financial crisis, occasioned by the salary settlements that spring, nearly meant that the Program was stillborn. The Board was to spend a considerable amount of time over the next few years seeking outside funding; the Connaught Foundation proved especially receptive. Professor Gotlieb's resignation from the Advisory Board (as it was known from 1989) was reluctantly accepted in March, 1990.

These files contain correspondence, notes, minutes, financial statements, and reports. The arrangement is chronological.

Correspondence

This series contains a mix of personal and professional correspondence, both incoming and outgoing spanning five decades. The early correspondence (1947-1968) richly documents Gotlieb’s early role in the development of computer science at the University of Toronto, first within the Department of Physics and later the Computation Centre and its successor bodies the Institute of Computer Science and the Department of Computer Science. There are two files marked “historical” that contain correspondence that Gotlieb selected as significant to the history of computing. Most of these early files are marked “personal” but are really professional in nature. This “personal” correspondence mainly deals with appointments, recommendations, advice, visits, lectures and thanks from a wide range of colleagues and former students.

Later correspondence (ca. 1968-1995) was arranged more of less by either activity or organization. Therefore, general correspondence files relating to Gotlieb’s publishing activities, conferences, trips and lectures are grouped together and are followed by files containing correspondence with other universities: Canadian, US and international. These document the breadth of Gotlieb’s contacts and relationships with colleagues all over the world. Files marked University of Toronto document Gotlieb’s activities on campus with respect to some committees, special lectures, planning roles, cross appointments etc.. but only in a very cursory way. There are also a series of files relating to government bodies that mainly document his advisory roles. Finally, there is one box of printed e-mail that can cover any of the above mentioned categories and more. They date from June 1989 to June 1993 and are arranged chronologically.

Also included in this series are three files of Letters of Recommendation, dating from 1983-2001. Some of this correspondence relates to the Student Files found in Series X. Gotlieb was often asked for recommendations for former students long after they graduated.

Professional associations and committees

This series contains correspondence, reports, memos, notes, minutes of meetings relating to Gotlieb's participation in several professional associations and committees external to the University of Toronto. Of some interest for researchers of early computing are the printed proceedings of the Computation Seminar in 1949 and the Scientific Computation Forum in 1950 hosted by IBM. A group photograph taken at the first meeting is part of this series and has been filed at /001P(30). Other early records document the 1968 Congress of the International Federation of Information Processing in Edinburgh that Gotlieb helped organize. A 2001 history of IFIP is also included in this series, a chapter of which deals specifically with Gotlieb’s contribution to the international body. There is also documentation relating to the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Computer History Project. Gotlieb was interviewed for this project and the 1971 transcript describes early computing at the University of Toronto from 1949 to 1961.

The greatest extent of records in this series documents Gotlieb’s active participation in the Association of Computing Machines – more commonly known as ACM. Included is some early correspondence (1960-1965) as well as correspondence while Editor-in-Chief of two publications Communications and The Journal of ACM. There are three boxes of files documenting his influential position as Chair of the ACM Awards Committee, a position he held from 1988-1993 and from 1998 to the present.

Conferences, talks and seminars

This series includes files relating to participation at conferences, seminars and special lectures. The files most often contain a copy of the paper or talk given at the event as well as related correspondence, information about the event such as conference programs, meeting outlines and notes. Some of these papers were subsequently published, usually in the journal for the sponsoring organization. Other records relating to the publishing of papers can be found in Series 6. Researchers should note that many of these papers relate to how computers have affected society and are therefore a rich resource for studying the larger social impact of computers.

Teaching files

Series consists of correspondence, lectures notes, course outlines and notes related to courses and lectures. It arranged by course or lecture chronologically.

Student files

Student files kept by Dr. Marsden which document the progress of her students (mainly graduate students). Files vary in content but usually contain correspondence, thesis proposals, critiques and analysis, letters of reference, marks, and Ph.D. oral comprehensive exam questions.

Addresses

The addresses in this series are ones that are not integrated into the files of material submitted for publication, principally as proceedings of conferences (see Series 5), or into the files on courses Professor Shaw taught at the University of Toronto (see Series 4). The files contain any combination of correspondence, notes, drafts of the addresses and photographs.

University of Toronto. Administration

Consists of correspondence, reports, minutes, and research notes which reflect the academic and administrative appointments held by Robin Harris and his involvement in the activities of the Joint University and Toronto Board of Education (1960-1961), the Committee of Presidents, the Committee on Research and Planning (1970-71), the Presidential Advisory Committee on Policy and Planning (1958-1961) the Presidential Advisory Committee on Archives (1970-71), the Library Oral History Project (1973-1987), and the Off-campus colleges committee (1963), and the Committee of the Teaching Staff (1975-1976). Also includes records relating to the Presidential Advisory Committee on the status and future of Scarborough College (1970-1971) originally owned by Prof. E. F. Sheffield, and records of the Curriculum Review and Planning Project for the Faculty of Social Work (1977).

The idea of writing a new university history focusing on higher education was a brainchild of Professor Harris and was set in motion through efforts of members of the Sesquicentennial History Project and its advisory committee. The finished product, a university history book, was to be published during the university's 150th year in 1977. As University Historian, his role is documented in the correspondence and minutes of this committee, as well as reports, proposals, drafts and outlines of an unfinished manuscript.

Education and teaching files

This series contains annotated student handbooks, programmes for football and hockey games, and an issue of the Undergrad, all from Brian Land’s undergraduate years; course notes for an MLS college universities library administration course taught largely by Margaret Cockshutt in 1955-1956; a file Land compiled while chairing the constitution revision committee of the Alumni of the Library School (1954-1959); and lecture notes for two courses he gave in the Library School, Ontario College of Education (1961-1963); and correspondence relating to his appointment as its director (1964). There is a final file relating to his Labour Gazette indexing project for the federal Department of Labour (1956-1958).

Dr. Land kept only selected lecture notes. For others, see Series IV of B1993-0026.

1962 election, Eglinton constituency

Brian Land enrolled in the School of Graduate Studies in the fall of 1960 as a political science student. The opportunity for a thesis topic arose in the spring of 1962 as a federal election loomed. He chose to conduct a study of the campaign in the Eglinton constituency in Toronto, partly because he was a resident and because he had a personal acquaintance with a number of the principals involved.

Land offered his services to Donald Fleming, the long-standing Progressive Conservative member from the Toronto riding of Eglinton, and Minister of Finance in John Diefenbaker’s government. It was the first and only time that Land worked for a Conservative candidate. His notebook records that his first meeting was on May 10
and, over the next five weeks, he immersed himself in the strategy sessions, meetings, and envelope stuffing sessions and other activities of electioneering. He attended meetings of the Liberal candidate, Mitchell Sharp, as well as those of Mr. Fleming, and collected campaign literature from all parties.

This series contains background material to the constituency, Land’s notebook, correspondence, notes, membership and voter lists, poll revisions, maps, election results by poll, addresses, campaign literature and buttons, and press coverage. The bulk of the material relates to the Fleming campaign.

The records are grouped by function.

Davenport-Dovercourt Liberal Association

Brian Land’s involvement in party politics was primarily in the Liberal party at the federal level. He was a member of the executive of the Davenport-Dovercourt Liberal Association, for which, in 1965, he carried out a study of the Davenport voting record by conducting a poll analysis for the years 1952-1963. In February of 1968 he was elected as a delegate to the forthcoming Liberal leadership convention that chose Pierre Elliott Trudeau to succeed Lester Pearson as Prime Minister.

This series contains files consisting of: the constitution, lists of executive officers, minutes, correspondence and press clippings documenting the activities of the Davenport-Dovercourt Liberal Association from 1965-1968; the questionnaire, notes, correspondence, maps and report relating to the Davenport voting record; local press coverage, poll results and capitulation sheets for Eglinton riding in 1963 when Mitchell Sharp was elected for the first time (in oversized folders); campaign literature and press clippings relating to Walter Gordon’s successful re-election in 1965; and credentials (including buttons and decals) for and press clippings about the Association’s delegates to the 1968 convention.

Co-operative Housing Case Study: meeting minutes & transcripts

This series consists of meeting minutes, agendas, notices and notes by both Breslauer and Andrews for meetings of the Co-op Habitat Association of Toronto (CHAT) Board of Directors and staff, as well as the Ashworth Square Co-operative Board of Directors, staff and general membership covering the period from 5 October 1971 to 2 January 1974. It also consists of paper transcripts of meetings from 12 January 1972 CHAT staff meeting to the 18 September 1973 ASC Board of Directors meeting.

Student activities

Personal correspondence with friends and University officials, brochures, flyers, pamphlets, and reports relating to courses in Caribbean studies created and collected during Mr. Pieters undergraduate years (B.A. Political Science, 1993) at New College. Also included is a file on New College Alumni Association containing copies of reports, etc relating to the provostial review of the college, 1996. This series also includes photos documenting his activities as a student including social events, meetings, dinners and his graduation.

Future Teachers Club

The Future Teachers Club is an initiative of the Faculty of Education to encourage African/Canadian students in elementary and secondary schools to consider teaching as a career. The objective is to increase the number of African/Canadian teachers in the classrooms to a level which is reasonably representative of African/Canadians in relation to European/Canadians, Asian/Canadians and Aboriginal/Canadians in the provincial population.

This series consists of correspondence, reports, minutes of meetings, survey forms and results, brochures, and flyers collected by Mr Pieters as an active participant in this club while a student at the Faculty of Education. Also included are records relating to "Promoting equity for the teachers of tomorrow" (PETT), a program "undertaken to encourage students from African Canadian and Portuguese communities to consider teaching as a career. There is also a photo album showing Pieters practice teaching at a local school.

Students' Administrative Council

This series consists of two files relating to Mr. Pieters participation in the March, 1994 presidential election campaign of SAC. Mr. Pieters acted as campaign manager for presidential candidate, Andrea Madho, but withdrew his support when he could no longer support the methods being used in the campaign. Included are correspondence, notes, election materials, and articles. Also included is an unsigned and undated typescript of "Beyond Ambition: 14 days in March. The scandalous road to win the 1994 University of Toronto Students' Administrative Council Election".

Correspondence

Correspondence is mainly with colleagues regarding on-going research and results. Included is some correspondence with Dr. Ken Fisher, Dr. Scott's associate.

Manuscript files

Manuscript files document the research and publishing activities of both Dr. Scott and Dr. Fisher. Apart from drafts of articles many files also contain notes, points of discussion, some original data and data analysis, correspondence regarding publication and referee comments, and results of research not published.

They are identified by the research topic (which usually corresponded to one or two articles) and, since the material is largely undated, files have been dated ca. the date of the published article. It should be noted that much of the contents of the file however will have been created before this date.

Student papers

This series includes course notes in Physics and Biology taken as an undergraduate student in biology at the University of Toronto as well as graduate course notes, drawings, early draft and final submission of her Masters thesis.

Professional correspondence

This series is comprised of professional correspondence, incoming and outgoing, between William and his colleagues and/or students. Correspondence is usually filed by the person's name but some files reflect the type of correspondence ie. recommendations, references, applications. The correspondence relates mainly to research endeavours being undertaken with colleagues or students, meetings or symposiums in which Williams was participating, visits from international colleagues, recommendations of students for post-graduate scholarships or employment positions and applications from students wanting to study under Williams.

Laboratory notebooks

Includes four laboratory notebooks: two belonging to Williams and two belonging to individual students. They document how Williams organized his laboratory work and how he supervised his students' work.

Professional Correspondence

Correspondence and related attachments document Zimmerman's professional relationships especially with co-authors of published articles, research partners and former Ph.D. students.

Publications

Records in this series document Zimmerman' s publishing activities relating to refereed articles, chapters in books, books edited and papers presented at symposia, and subsequently published in proceedings and journals. Files contain draft manuscripts, submitted final drafts, some research notes, as well as correspondence among the authors, with publishers and comments from reviewers. They are arranged chronologically. Files are titled most often with the name of the authors and sometimes the "running title". A cross-reference number [ in brackets ] refers to its corresponding bibliographic reference in Zimmerman's c.v. found in the file list

Seminars and Talks

This series documents attendance and participation at professional conferences, meetings and symposia. Files contain correspondence relating to attendance and the delivery of papers, as well as manuscripts of seminars and talks. They also contain general information regarding meetings including conference programs, list of participants, minutes and proceedings. Includes associations and symposia such as: the International Cell Cycle Congress, Canadian Federation of Biological Sciences, the American Society of Cell Biology and the International Congress of Physiological Sciences.

This series also includes notes and draft manuscripts for workshops and invited lectures especially relating to Zimmerman's research on narcotics and particularly marijuana in the 1970s. All files are titled most often by the institution or group hosting the seminar and are arranged chronologically.

Graphic material

This series includes photographs and technical drawings of pressure equipment used by Zimmerman in early high pressure research.

Correspondence

This series consists of incoming and outgoing correspondence arranged chronologically. Included is some personal correspondence but most is professional correspondence with colleagues on varied academic and administrative topics including exhibits, issues on teaching architecture, research and design philosophy. Also included is administrative correspondence within the Faculty.

Exhibition files

Files relating to the mounting of exhibits by faculty and students, most notably Connaitre/Reconnaitre Le Corbusier exhibit in 1987 and Restatements and Realizations: Built work of graduates of the School since 1893, put together by van Ginkel as part of the Centenary Celebrations.

The general administrative files around borrowing, lending and mounting exhibits are filed at the beginning of this series, followed by the specific administrative files on the above mentioned exhibits. Finally, files relating to exhibits borrowed and mounted at the Faculty's gallery are arranged in chronological order.

This series contains photographs, negatives and slides documenting the mounting of exhibits in the Faculty of Architecture including the 1983 exhibit on Le Corbusier and the school's centenary exhibit "Restatement and Realizations: Built work of graduates of the School since 1893". All photographs, slides and negatives have been removed, placed in their own files and boxed separately. In such cases, a SEPARATION NOTICE has been inserted to indicate the existence of graphic materials.

Correspondence

This series contains a mixture of personal and professional correspondence with friends, colleagues, government departments, publishers and non-governmental organizations relating to all aspects of Metta Spencer's career. The correspondence, in the form of letters, faxes and e-mail, document her network of friendships especially throughout the international peace community as well with other North American sociologists.

Addresses and speeches

This series contains addresses and speeches presented mainly at peace conferences, meetings and professional sociology associations. Most of them relate to the peace movement, advocacy and disarmament. There is also Spencer's speech on accepting the Jus Prize in Human Rights. Again these papers represent only a small fraction of addresses given throughout Spencer's career. Arrangement is chronological for specific titles with general speeches filed at the end.

University of Toronto Administration

Although Prof. Spencer held many administrative positions within the Department of Sociology, including several terms as associate chair for Erindale, this series mainly documents her successful efforts to establish and co-ordinate an interdisciplinary Peace and Conflict Studies Programme at Erindale College. Included are the early proposals and background documentation, minutes of meeting, reports, course and program descriptions and correspondence.

Books

This series consists of two sets of files. The first set relates to Prof. Nelson’s only published book Land and Power: Britain and Allied Policy on Germany’s Frontiers 1916-1919 (University of Toronto Press and Routledge, Keagan Paul, London, 1963). Included is a full typescript with revisions, as well as some earlier drafts. Some drafts are also interfiled with notes found in Series 6 Research Notes. This series also contains some correspondence with the publishers and a signed publication agreement. There is additional correspondence relating to permissions for use of materials. Finally there is a file of collected reviews of the book and informal comments. In 1963, this book shared the George Lewis Beer Prize given by the American Historical Society for ‘outstanding work in the field of European international history since 1895’.

A second set of files relates to research Prof. Nelson undertook late in his career. It was a book on the trial and conviction of a British citizen, Miss Malecka, in 1912 in Russia on a charge of sedition. While one file of notes is dated 1983, records generally indicate that Prof. Nelson began researching the case in earnest in the early 1990s. He was studying it in reference to the question of ‘nationality’ and what it could reveal about Anglo Russian relations prior to WWI. Entitled simply Malecka Case, typescripts begin in 1993 and go through various drafts up to 2004. There is no evidence in the records that Prof. Nelson had sought out a publisher and it is clear the book was never published. These drafts, revisions, outlines and notes have been arranged chronologically.

Associations and committees

This series consists of files for committee and clubs in which Prof. Nelson was an active member. Files relating to his days as a student show his involvement in the Modern History Club (1938) and the Historical Club (1939-40) at the University of Toronto. In the latter club, he held the position of secretary then president. From those early years, there is also a file documenting his work in the Eglinton Jr. Conservative Club (1939-1943). Files contain memorabilia, notes, minutes, membership lists and correspondence.

Later in his career, there are more professional types committees outside of the framework of the University of Toronto including the Atlantic Treaty Organization (1960-1964), a provincial body called the Ontario Curriculum Institute (1962-1964), as well as the Canada Council Academic Advisory Panel (1975). For all of these later committees, files contain original correspondence, agenda and minutes as well as reports and notes.

Biographical

This series gives a good overview of Prof. Moggridge’s career. Correspondence and personnel documents discuss appointments, applications, leaves and promotions. There are also several files relating to awards and fellowships as well as research grant applications. Finally, there is a copy of an unpublished autobiography with related notes.

Papers and talks

This series further documents Prof. Moggridge academic publishing and output. Included are non refereed articles and papers, as well as unpublished works such as talks, seminars, and papers presented at conferences. Files contain at least one draft of article or paper and possibly some related notes and/or correspondence. They are arranged chronologically.

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