Print preview Close

Showing 1624 results

Archival description
University of Toronto Archives and Records Management Services Series
Print preview View:

Professional Associations

Records in this series document Dr. Hogg's involvement in numerous associations relating to the study of astronomy. The series, comprised mainly of correspondence, memoranda, reports, membership lists, newsletters, agenda and committee minutes, documents the various positions of authority she held in the leading national and international astronomical and scientific organizations. They cover a twenty-five year span including:

Program Director for Astronomy, United States National Science Foundation (1955-1956); president of the International Astronomical Union Subcommission on Variable Stars in Star Clusters (1955-1961); president of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada (1957-1959); first woman president of the Physical Sciences section, Royal Society of Canada (1960-1961); president of the Royal Canadian Institute (1964); Councillor of the American Astronomical Society (1965-1968); first president of the Canadian Astronomical Society (1971-1972); honorary president of the Toronto Centre, Royal Astronomical Society of Canada (1972-1977) and honorary president of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada (1977-1981).

The series also serves to document the wider activities of these organizations in addition to simply shedding light on the activities of Dr. Hogg alone. Notably, council and committee minutes strongly document the workings of the Toronto Centre of the R.A.S.C. between 1961-1986, the R.S.C. between 1955-1985 and the R.C.I. from 1954-1968. The activities of the IAU are also well represented. In particular, a series of reports and memoranda between 1952-1981 highlight the workings of Commission 27 on Variable Stars. Related records outlining the activities of these professional organizations can also be found in the General Professional Correspondence Series (Series I).

Arrangement is alphabetical by association, which include:

  • American Astronomical Society (AAS)
  • American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO)
  • Canadian Astronomical Society (CAS)
  • International Astronomical Union (IAU)
  • National Research Council (NRC)
  • National Science Foundation (NSF)
  • Royal Astronomical Society of Canada (RASC)
  • Royal Canadian Institute (RCI)
  • Royal Society of Canada (RSC)

Publishing

Series documents Prof. Hassanpour’s publishing activity, both as an author and editor. Material includes scholarly articles, encyclopedic entries, and reviews that cover the broad scope of Prof. Hassanpour’s research in social linguistics, media and communication theory, Kurdish culture, as well as peasant and nationalist movements. The series also includes documentation of Prof. Hassanpour’s work as an editor, in particular for the Gzing journal.

Correspondence

Series consist of academic and scholarly correspondence sent to and received by Prof. Hassanpour over five decades. The correspondence documents exchanges with Kurdish intellectuals, political leaders, poets, artists, and musicians. The material also includes correspondence to libraries, publishers, and academic and research institutions in North America, Europe, and the Middle East. Content of the letters include exchanges on Kurdish culture, history and literature, bibliography of Kurdish books, standardization of Kurdish languages, hierarchy of knowledge in the twentieth century, and peasant and worker movements in the Middle East. Noteworthy among these scholars are Noam Chomsky, Sheikh Ezzedin Hosseini, Sherko Bekas, Shoko Okazaki, Janet Afary, and Tom Ricks. Material included in Kurdish is also important for those interested in Kurdish literature in exile.

Professional associations and conferences

This series consists of files on organizations, conferences, symposia and workshops, arranged alphabetically. The most thoroughly documented ones are those in which Professor McLeod was involved in an organizational or executive capacity. The earliest files document his involvement in multicultural issues in Saskatchewan, specifically problems associated with language instruction in French. They contain correspondence, notes, briefs submitted to the Royal Commission on Bilingualism and Biculturalism and to the Saskatchewan Committee on Instruction in Languages other than English, associated
reports, and a seminar on bilingual education (1964-1966). Later, in Ontario, his overlapping duties as chair of the Ontario Multicultural Education Conference Committee (1980-1983) and president of the Canadian Council for Multicultural and Intercultural Education (1981-1985), for example, enabled him to play a central role in organizing the early national conferences on multicultural education. He organized and chaired two colloquiums on “Multiculturalism – Teaching and Learning”, sponsored by FEUT (1990, 1991), and was a co-organizer of the International Colloquium on Ethnicity, Conflict and Cooperation held in Moscow in 1992. McLeod also attended a number of international conferences as a Canadian representative. These include four (1977-1987) world congresses of the Comparative and International Education Association, and the Circumpolar Conference of Indigenous People in Iceland (1993).

McLeod was involved in an executive capacity in many organizations, the files for which contain the correspondence, notes and memoranda, minutes and reports that reveal the extent of his involvement. The principal bodies, for which there is extensive documentation, are the Canadian Association for Second Language Teachers (CASALT), Canadian Ethnic Studies Association (CESA), Canadian Council for Multicultural and Intercultural Education (CCMIE), Canadian History of Education Association (CHEA), Multicultural Health Coalition (MHC), the Multiculturalism and Aging Seniors Coordinating Committee (MASCC), and the Ontario Multicultural Association (OMAMO). He was also frequently asked to advise governments on policy. He gave, for example, evidence to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Multiculturalism and served on the Ontario Advisory Committee on Multiculturalism.

Education

This series contains certificates and diplomas, correspondence, course and lab notes, term papers and memorabilia documenting aspects of Davidson Black’s education, running from the Wellesley School through Harbord Collegiate and the Faculties of Medicine and Arts at the University of Toronto. There is also a file on Davidson’s summer project in 1907 to earn money for his Bachelor of Arts program, prospecting in the Temagami Forest Reserve.

Correspondence files

Correspondence between Cinader and members of the international medical and university communities documenting mainly the business of various institutes, conferences, research projects. Also some matters relating to the Faculty of Medicine and the Institute of Immunology. Files are arranged alphabetically by name of correspondent.

Committee and association files

Records document Cinader's involvement in various committees both within the Faculty of Medicine and within the larger medical community. Included are files on the Council of the Faculty of Medicine, the Institute of Immunology, , Clinical Immunology Coordinating Committee, the Ethics Committee, various committees of the World Health Organisation. Also included in this series is a paper written by Cinader about the history of the International Union of Immunological Societies entitled The Origins and Early Years of IUIS.

International conference and symposiums

Records relating to the various international conferences on immunology attended by Cinader, mainly correspondence, conference programmes, papers and conference overviews. Documents Cinader's active involvement in the international medical and health community. Included are files on the 6th International Congress on Immunology held in Toronto in 1986 and of which Cinader was a key organiser.

Lecture Notes

Consists of:

  • lecture notes; course material; term papers, 1967-1986; student files, 1978-1981 [boxes /003 to /009]
  • non-University of Toronto lecture notes [box /010]

Correspondence

In-coming as well as out-going correspondence was arranged by Lee in various runs. Filed at the beginning is a chronological series of files containing letters from 1967-1972. One file contains job offers from various universities in 1969-70 while another file relates to correspondence around his job offer at the University of Toronto. Apart from job offers, most of the correspondence is with colleagues world wide and is of both a professional and personal nature. Much of the early correspondence relates to field trips to the Kalahari and related research.

The second run of files is general alphabetical files with correspondence dating from about 1970 to 1975. Again this correspondence relates mainly to Prof. Lee’s research and is from colleagues and students. It includes comments on his publications and routine requests for information and advice, requests to attend seminar and talks and other professional meetings, as well as Prof. Lee’s reports or comments as a peer reviewer of papers. There are also letters of recommendation, reviews of theses and general correspondence documenting his role as a teacher.

A third run is an alphabetical run of files arranged by the correspondent. Correspondence is similar in nature to the general alphabetical files described above but is more voluminous for each person and covers a time period mainly from 1965-1975 with the bulk dating from the late 1960s to 1972. Included is correspondence with well known anthropologists such as Carl Heider (Brown University / University of Southern California), Adam Kuper (University College, London), Mary Leakey, Sidney Mintz (Yale University), Julian Steward (Colombia / University of Illinois), Sherwood Washburn (Harvard University and Lee’s advisor) and Eric Wolf (City University of New York).

Finally, Prof. Lee himself arranged a small run of correspondence files from famous people or people influential in his professional development. They include people such as Margaret Atwood and Carl Sagan as well as fellow anthropologists Philip Tobias and Bruce Trigger.

In addition to the correspondence from the 2007 donation, there is a grouping of correspondence from the 2012 addition. This is arranged alphabetically by correspondent, with occasional subject file as designated by Lee. Many of the earlier correspondents appear in this section again.

Publications

While Prof. Lee has published over a hundred papers, reviews, chapters in books as well as several books, this series contains manuscripts and typescripts for only a handful. Some of the files contain related correspondence and drafts. There are reviews written by Lee as well as correspondence with publishers especially for his Man the Hunter. Except for one paper, all date from 1965-1975. They are arranged chronologically.

Nevertheless, this series does contain the original manuscript of Prof. Lee’s acclaimed "The !Kung San: Men and Women and Work in a Foraging Society". This book was included in a list by American Scientist of important books in science for the 20th century. Under the category of “The Nature and the Rise of our own Species”, Lee’s book shares the list with books by Sigmund Freud, Mary Leaky, Noam Chomsky and Ivan P. Pavlov to name but a few.[1]

[1] Morrison, Philip and Phylis Morrison, “100 or so books that Shaped a Century of Science” in American Scientist, Fall 1999.

Teaching

This series consists of course files containing lectures, course outlines and reading lists for courses taught by Prof. at Lee at Harvard, Rutgers, the University of Toronto, the Marxist Institute, and others.

Grants

This series consists of grant proposals and their resulting paperwork, primarily from the Canada Council and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council. These include grants for Prof. Lee’s work in Africa.

Student Notebooks

These are Prof. Lee’s notebooks from when he was a student. Many of his instructors are well known in the field of anthropology or worked with Lee during his career. For some of them, their records are also held by the University of Toronto. Instructors include: Ronald Cohen, Dr. C. D. Ellis, J.N. Emerson, Dr. Nathan Keyfitz, Dr. Thomas F. MacIlwraith, Cranford Pratt, Dr. James W. Vanstone, Dr. Fred W. Voget.

Publications and addresses

This series documents only one of Davidson Black’s publications, but more of his addresses, in particular some he delivered in 1925 before his discovery of Peking Man, and the Croonian Lecture in December 1932 that cemented the acceptance of his research.

Education and Personal Activities

The series partially documents Francess Halpenny’s education received at Maxville Sunday School in 1927 ; at the Public Schools of the Counties of Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry in 1928 ; and at the Oakwood Collegiate Institute, from 1931 to 1936. It also partially documents her undergraduate education, from 1937 to 1940, (B.A. in English literature) and her graduate studies (M.A. English literature) at the University of Toronto, in 1940 and 1941. The series documents the friendship between Francess Halpenny and Elizabeth and Jennifer Harper, between 1983 and 1986 ; Halpenny’s participation to social events, such as the dinner for 40th wedding anniversary of Morley and Clara Thomas in 1982, a dinner at Rideau Hall in 1983 and an evening in honour of Floyd S. Chalmer, Jean A. Chalmer and John Beckwith in 1984.

The series consists of 7 files including certificates and diplomas, course notes, Faculty of Arts Class and Prize Lists, correspondence and press clippings. It also includes one letter received from J. Mavor Moore, 16 October 1989 regarding Halpenny’s course notes he had kept from the University years ; a certificate of Honour Award received in recognition of her contribution to the undergraduate life at the University of Toronto, 7 June 1940 ; personal correspondence received after a period of illness in 1984 ; the address she gave at J. Russell Harper funeral and his obituary for the Royal Society of Canada.

Honours and Awards

The series documents the honours and awards received by Francess Halpenny during her career. It also documents the lectures and seminars she gave as Distinguished Visitor at the University of Alberta in 1989.

The series consists of 20 files including correspondence, ceremony proceedings, diplomas, convocation addresses, personal notes and press clippings. The series also contains 92 photographs of Halpenny taken during various convocation ceremonies or with dignitaries.

University of Toronto Press

The series consists of 1 files including a token received from University of Toronto Press apprentices in sign of recognition for Francess Halpenny’s support ; address she gave at the launch of "The Clear Spirit", in 1967; correspondence received when she retired at the age of 65 in 1984.

Hartle Consulting Records

Included is correspondence, contracts and proposals relating to projects undertaken by Hartle Consulting Ltd. for such groups as the Economic Council of Canada, Ontario Economic Council, Department of Energy, Mines and Resources, Canada Cable Systems and the Commission of Inquiry into Residential Tenancies.

Personal files

The three files in this series contain copies of Professor Hartle's curriculum vitae, printouts of his computer directories and logs, and a list of his journals.

Teaching materials and lecture notes

This series contains notes for lectures and some more formalized lectures, with some correspondence, memos, tables, press clippings, articles and other background material. Some of the files contain course outlines and lists of reading materials, and examinations. The series begins with notes for lectures on specific topics, which are followed by lecture notes filed by course number and name, when known.

Intermediate Dynamics (unpublished)

This series contains correspondence, notes, captions, diagrams and complete typescript of the unpublished manuscript written by Derek Paul entitled Intermediate Dynamics, a textbook for undergraduate students in physics to be published by Prentice-Hall,Inc. Chapter titles are: the principles of dynamics, particle motion in one and two dimensions, central forces, perturbations of elliptic orbits in the plans of the ellipse, particle motion in three dimensions, systems of many particles, and the rigid body and its motion in three dimensions.

For photoprints for frontespiece and chapter 5 see B1995-0020/001P(01).

Teaching files

This series contains files on courses Professor Lang taught at the University of Toronto and Central Michigan University. The files contain a combination of any of correspondence, memos, course applications, course outlines, bibliographies, background papers. Some files contain marks. Not all of Professor Lang’s courses are represented in this series.

The files are grouped by institution, the level of courses, and by ascending course number at the undergraduate and then the graduate level.

Lecture notes and teaching materials

This series consists primarily of files relating to courses taught by Lenskyj in her career as an instructor and subsequently professor at OISE and the School of Physical Health and Education. Includes course syllabi, course readings, and lecture notes. Also includes teaching materials on early childhood education and English as a Second Language courses taught by Lenskyj prior to her association with the University of Toronto.

Administration

The records in this series contain the working papers of Prof. Andrews as a member of the Planning and Priorities Subcommittee of the Planning and Resources Committee of Governing Council from 1976 through his period as Chair (1978-1980). The Subcommittee was established on September 23, 1976 to replace the Planning Subcommittee for the academic session 1976-1977. Included are copies of agenda, reports, original correspondence and notes taken at meetings. Since Prof. Andrews also represented Erindale College, files relating to the College’s submissions to this Subcommittee will also be found.

Manuscripts and publications

Professor Helleiner is the author or editor of 18 books, over 100 refereed articles and contributions to volumes, even more non-refereed publications, many book reviews, and some letters to the editor. This series does not contain a complete record of his output or copies of all of his manuscripts. Some files may contain a comprehensive record of the writing of a particular piece, including correspondence with colleagues (Professor Helleiner habitually ran his drafts by them) and/or publishers, contracts, notes and notebooks, drafts of manuscripts and comments on them, offprints, reviews, and royalty statements. Others may contain only the contract, perhaps a letter or two, or a review, but no manuscripts or offprints.

Some of Professor Helleiner's writing have been translated into other languages, including French, Italian, Japanese, Norwegian, Spanish, and Swedish.

For the three WIDER volumes that Professor Helleiner edited and for which he wrote introductions and/or chapters, see Series 6.

Personal and biographical

Files in accession B2005-0001 contain correspondence with family, friends, and colleagues received by Prof. Russell over more than four decades. Unlike the other series of correspondence described below, the contents of letters, cards and notes is more familiar and personal in nature and generally deals with non-professional activities such as trips, seasonal greetings, family matters, neighborhood and church activities, activities of friends and colleagues. Early correspondence discusses his appointment to the University of Toronto as lecturer (1958) correspondence with Oxford University regarding the M.A. exams, and appointment as assistant professor (1965). Some copies of Prof. Russell’s replies are included with incoming letters. Topics among the subject files include the Bathurst/St. Clair Task Force, Hillcrest Neighborhood Resources, Ontario Liberal Association, University Settlement, and Wychwood Park.

Files in accessions B2017-0006 and B2019-0008 contain records related to the personal life of Prof. Russell. Material covers awards received, family vacation property (Minnicog Company of Jarvises), family reunions, memorial addresses and services for colleagues, personal essays, and a convocation address.

Correspondence – General

This major series within the fonds documents Prof. Russell’s academic career at the University of Toronto. Correspondence consists mainly of incoming letters from University of Toronto faculty, colleagues, judges, provincial and federal politicians, editors, students, and friends, discussing mostly professional and academic activities relating to teaching, research and publications. This series begins during his period as Associate Professor in the Department of Political Economy and includes correspondence relating to his such activities as research fellowship at Harvard University, acting principal and later principal of Innis College, visiting professorship at Makerere University in Uganda, visiting fellowships at Osgoode Hall, York University, Australian National University, and European University Institute, Fiesole, Italy. Correspondents include Bob Rae, Martin Friedland, Stefan Dupré, James Lorimer, Meric Gertler, and Justice D.C. McDonald.

This series also includes some correspondence relating to Prof. Russell’s role as director of research for the Royal Commission of Inquiry into Certain Activities of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, (McDonald Commission). This commission was established in 1977 following allegations of crimes by the RCMP Security Service.

Churchill Society for the Advancement of Parliamentary Democracy

Series consists of material documenting Prof. Russell’s activity within the Churchill Society for the Advancement of Parliamentary Democracy. From 2001 to 2003, Russell served as Chair of the organization and, in 2017, he continues his participation on the Board of Directors. Material documents a range of functions within these roles including surveys of members, event planning, and the activities of the Statue Committee. Records include meeting minutes, correspondence, planning documentation and reports.

Teaching

Prof. Russell taught several courses in political science at both the undergraduate and graduate level at the University of Toronto beginning with his appointment as lecturer in 1958. Additionally, he taught courses outside the University at institutions such as the Royal Canadian Air Force College (1964-1968) and Makerere University College in Uganda, as well as through the Learning to Live in Retirement courses. This series contains correspondence with students as well as lecture notes, course outlines, reading lists, and correspondence with University administration and co-instructors such as Bob Rae. Of particular interest may be POL 299Y, a research directed seminar conducted in 1995-1996 relating to Prof. Russell’s research on the Mabo case for his book Recognizing Aboriginal Title: The Mabo Case and Indigenous Resistance to English-Settler Colonialism (2006).

Press

Series consists of Prof. Russell’s commentary and appearances in the media. Material includes opinion pieces, editorials, and responses to a number of national issues including the prorogation of Parliament (2008-2009), minority governments, nuclearization, the long-gun registry, and judicial appointments. Series also includes records related to interviews given on television and radio in both Canada and Australia.

General correspondence

This series is made up of general correspondence files, arranged alphabetically by the name of the correspondent or by the name of the person about whom Prof. McNeill is corresponding. Incoming and outgoing correspondence cover such areas as research, supervision of graduate students, editing of papers, trips, as well as numerous letters of reference for past students and colleagues seeking recommendations for appointments, tenure, awards and grants. Some correspondence relates to consultancy work such as files on the Ministry of the Solicitor General, Advanced Medical Systems, Inc., and Scintrex Ltd.. There is extensive correspondence with colleagues in Australia regarding his involvement in the development of a body compositional laboratory at Prince Henry Hospital in Melbourne.

The files often contain attached documentation to the correspondence. This is most often the case when corresponding with or about students under his supervision. Files may include drafts of thesis, research reports and Ph.D. oral assessments.

University of Toronto Radiation Protection Authority

Prof. McNeill was chair of this body from 1977-1991. The UTRPA is responsible for developing and enforcing guidelines for all aspects of radioactive materials and experiments on campus to ensure that guidelines set by the Atomic Energy Board of Canada are being met. These records include correspondence, reports, memoranda, agenda, minutes, guidelines and manuals which document the activity of this body. Records are filed by year.

Archives of Newfoundland Mines Study

This series is a collection of documentation in form of reports, data, research materials and articles relating to the study of radon levels in Newfoundland Mines conducted by the Federal Government in the 1960s. Most of this material is copies given to Prof. McNeill to conduct his research on radon exposure for the Atomic Energy Board of Canada. There is however a scattering of his original notes and correspondence from the 1995 that he produced while writing his report entitled Measurements of Radon Progeny in Canadian Mines before 1968. The report itself can be found in Series 8 – Consultancy, Box B2005-0004/003 (13). The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission has requested that these records remain with Kenneth G. McNeill Fonds since Prof McNeill was their last custodian.

Course notes

Irvine Glass entered the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering at the University of Toronto as an undergraduate in the fall of 1938. He left at the end of his second year to serve in the Royal Canadian Air Force during the Second World War, where he served as an aeronautical engineer and wireless air gunner. In the fall of 1945, he was back on campus. His principal courses now were in engineering mechanics, aircraft design and heat engines, and he graduated with honours in aeronautical engineering in 1947. He enrolled in graduate studies in the fall, at the same time acting as an instructor at the Subsonic Wind Tunnel at the University of Toronto. He obtained his MASc in the spring of 1948 and in the fall enrolled as a doctoral student under Gordon Patterson in the new Institute of Aerophysics, where he specialized in the study of the effect of shock waves. The title of his doctoral thesis is "The design and development of a wave interaction tube for the study of non-linear waves."

This series contains course notes and laboratory notes; problem sets, including one from his doctoral program on the absorption of shock waves; seminars on the kinetic theory of gases and blast time in supersonic wind tunnels that he conducted in 1950; and a copy of his doctoral thesis. The arrangement is by academic year and alphabetically by course within each year.

Results 401 to 450 of 1624