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University of Toronto Archives and Records Management Services Subseries
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Negotiating freer trade: the United Kingdom, the United States, Canada and the trade agreements of 1938.(Waterloo, Ont.: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 1989). Written with Norman Hillmer

Early manuscripts of this book were prepared under the title "A shaft of Baltic pine: negotiating the anglo-american-Canadian Trade agreements of 1938." Included in this subseries are an annotated paper presented to the 61st Annual meeting of the CHA (1982); manuscript version originally submitted to the Social Science Federation of Canada for subsidy (Sept. 1985); drafts of various chapters, research notes, and correspondence with Wilfrid Laurier University Press.

Progress without planning: the economic history of Ontario from Confederation to the Second World War (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1987)

B1995-0013/013: Chapters 1 to 14: drafts and correspondence, 1981-1986
B1995-0013/014: Chapters 15 to 19; appendices, figures. Drafts and correspondence, 1980-1985
B1995-0013/015: Final drafts of manuscript with editor's marks and comments of D.G. Paterson, ca 1987. See also correspondence regarding this publication in Box /007(06-07)

Reviews

Sub-series consists of reprints of reviews written by Dr. Hacking. The subject of the reviews focus largely on the philosophy of science, logic, and objectivity.

Articles

Sub-series consists of reprints of articles written by Dr. Hacking. Records span his early career to the 2000’s and cover topics including statistics, logic, categorization, natural kinds, psychological trauma and disease.

Courts and Trials

After I was appointed dean in early 1972, I started to organise an interdisciplinary series of lectures on courts and trials (file 2). This was designed to make a statement that we were not just a professional school but were part of the University. The series was widely advertised and was given every few weeks throughout the academic year 1972-73 (files 3-4). The contributors were from a wide array of disciplines--Reg Allen in philosophy, Don Dewees in economics, Tony Doob in psychology, Jim Giffen in sociology, Charles Hanly in psychoanalysis, Ken McNaught in history, Anatol Rapoport in mathematics, and Peter Russell and Don Smiley in political science (files 5-15). Northrop Frye backed out (file 8), but later contributed to the Crime in Literature series. The series was published by the U of T Press in 1975 (files 17-22) and the book was dedicated to Bora Laskin (file 11).

Letters of recommendation

This series consists of chronologically arranged letters of recommendation for graduate students and for other students with whom he was involved indirectly. These files are followed by individual files containing correspondence such as letters of recommendation prepared during their years at University of Toronto and after graduation.

Data

This subseries includes raw data in electronic form as well as Ms. Heaton's background notes on coding, computing and analyzing raw data in the SAS program.

Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples

In 1992, the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples, co-chaired by Judge René Dussault and Georges Erasmus, was established by the federal government. Prof. Russell was hired as Chair of the Research Advisory Committee and served from 1992-1995. According to the terms of reference, this Committee was to “devise and recommend a set of ethical principles to guide the conduct of research authorized” by the Royal Commission, “to provide advice on the overall design and methodological approaches of research”, and “to oversee discipline-based peer review in Political Science, Law, Economics, Anthropology/Sociology, Geography and History in addition to …peer review of Applied Studies and studies on the North”. Prof. Russell’s role is documented in correspondence, notes, newsletters, reports and manuscripts of studies. Among the studies included are “Aboriginal peoples and constitutional reform” written by Prof. Russell and Roger Jones, “Canadian governments and aboriginal peoples” governance papers for British Columbia, Nova Scotia, and Newfoundland and Labrador.

RFPs and commissioned research

This sub-series documents requests for proposals issued by NiPERA to seek out environmental research organizations willing to carry out research projects on the hazards of nickel exposure and related dangers for NiPERA. This sub-series also includes the research itself. Record types include notes, drafts, papers, reports, and correspondence. These records are arranged chronologically.

The Economics of John Stuart Mill. Vol.I & II

The Economics of John Stuart Mill. Vol.I & II (1985) was Hollander’s third in the series of studies on classical economists and it is evident in the reviews of the book that the criticisms garnered by Ricardo spilled over into many reviewers assessment of this voluminous work. The introduction to economist A.W. Coates’ (Duke University) review places Mill within the context of Hollander’s other works:

The reviewer of these volumes faces a daunting task, not simply because of their immense size but also because they cannot adequately be considered in isolation. Together with Professor Hollander’s earlier studies of The Economics of Adam Smith (1973, pp. 351) and The Economics of David Ricardo (1979, pp.759) they constitute a sustained campaign to establish the validity of singular unified interpretation of the central tradition of nineteenth-century British economic thought. Moreover, if Hollander’s main thesis is correct, it has direct implications for our understanding of orthodox (or mainstream) twentieth century economic thought.

He concludes:

Like the massively ambitious project of which it forms an integral part, Hollander’s Mill will leave a permanent imprint in the history of economics. (The Manchester School, September 1987 #3, pp.310-316)

Included is a highly annotated and corrected early draft of the work, parts of a middle draft and a complete final draft.

Classical Economics

Classical Economics, (1992) was designed as a text book for advanced undergraduate and graduate students and presents many of the ideas Hollander espoused in his books on Smith, Ricardo and Mill. Taped lectures found in Series V formed the starting point of the book.

Included are early and final drafts.

The Economics of Thomas Robert Malthus

The Economics of Thomas Robert Malthus (1997) is another of Hollander’s books in his continued study of the classical economists and like its predecessors, especially Ricardo, is poised to set off debate. Economist A.M.C. Waterman, in his article “Reappraisal of ‘Malthus the Economist’, 1933-97” (History of Political Economy 30:2 1998 pp 293-334) in which he reviews important literature surrounding Malthus, writes:

It is quite possible that scholars of the twenty-first century will come to regard Hollander on Malthus as the most important book in the history of economic analysis since Schumpeter 1954… And like most other books Hollander has so far produced, his latest will get its fair share of controversy and disagreement.

Included are various generations of drafts as well as early research and papers on Malthus.

Continuing Committee on the Constitutions

The series also contains significant documentation from the Continuing Committee on the Constitution (CCC), including reports, proposals, drafts, discussion papers, briefing notes, background documents, proposed clauses, responses from provincial governments, and agendas. Records include the opinions and reactions of many of the provinces with regards to proposed constitutional and senate reform. Records from the Multilateral Meetings on the Constitution (see next section) may also be filed in some of these folders.

Multilateral Meeting on the Constitution

Records relating to the Multilateral Meetings on the Constitution include lists of delegates, meeting transcripts, legal decisions, meeting reports, records of meetings, status reports, drafts, and memos. Many of these records are mixed in with records for the Continuing Committee on the Constitution (see above).

Later advisory work

Records relating to post 1992 work that Prof. Cameron did with the Ontario Government, providing advice on constitutional matters throughout the 1990s, and then with the Panel on the Future of Government in Ontario (2002-2004). Prof. Cameron (with Graham White and Celine Mulhern) produced Democracy in Ontario, a report for the Panel on the Future Role of Government in Ontario, in August 2003.

Annual reports, articles, correspondence

This subseries consists of annual reports on the Atherosclerosis study from 1953 to 1962, correspondence with Sunnybrook Hospital and U of T. officials as well as colleagues relating to the project’s operations and manuscripts and off prints of articles describing the results of various studies.

Summarized data

This series contains summarized data for each subject patient (coronary and control), arranged by decade. Includes name of patient, study number, data relating to physical condition at various dates, occupation, social class, etc.

APO C-II deficiency research

Series contains material documenting specific studies and general research within the Studies of Familial Apolipoprotein CII Deficiency project. Initiated in 1977, the project aimed to study family members with apolipoprotein C-II deficiencies in order to establish the clinical and genetic characteristics of the condition. Lead investigators were Diane Wilson Cox, Carl Breckenridge, and Alick Little. The project also included collaborative studies with external researchers. Included in the material are records related to the APO CII Deficient Pedigree Study and the Apoloprotein CII deficiency: An investigation of abnormalities of Lipids and Lipoproteins and the Anemia of Homozygotes project as well as documentation of field trips to the United States (Texas. Records include proposals, correspondence with patients, fellow researchers and doctors, patient records, data print-outs, family study questionnaires, lab results, and reports.

Access to the Law

In the summer of 1972, about the time I returned to the University of Toronto as Dean, I developed some ideas on access to the law which I had been thinking about when I was with the Law Reform Commission of Canada during the year 1971-72 .

The idea was to make the law accessible to non-lawyers who could not--then or now--penetrate the complex legal system, whether it was statutes, regulations, or cases. The scheme was to provide written material that could be digested by reasonably intelligent lay persons. It would combine federal and provincial laws. At the time the idea was to provide this information through encyclopaedias that would be available in public libraries and through intermediaries. It would also assist lawyers and legal aid clinics to find answers to problems and to be able to give material to interested clients. If the proposal were to be developed today, it would use the Internet. (See file 1).

A strong advisory committee was established, consisting of Francess Halpenny, the dean of the Faculty of Library Science, Ian Montagnes, the General Editor of the University of Toronto Press, Peter Russell, the Principal of Innis College, John Swan of the Faculty of Law, and Lyle Fairbairn, the counsel to the Ontario Law Reform Commission. (See file 2).

The Faculty of Law was heavily involved in the project because I thought it was desirable to try to get more interdisciplinary and group projects in the Faculty. (See file 3). Simcoe Hall was very supportive of the project. (File 4).

There was widespread consultation with librarians, lawyers and judges, and academics. (Files 5 to 7). Various governmental and non-governmental organisations were also consulted. (Files 8 to 13).

Various funding sources were explored. In the end, the funding was supplied by the Law Reform Commission of Canada, which took an active interest in the project. (Files 14 and 15).

Peter Jewett, a lawyer with Tory, Tory, and who had been my research assistant when he was at Law School, got a leave of absence from his firm to work on the project. He worked with his then wife, Linda Jewett, who was a librarian (she later became a lawyer). They travelled across the country discussing the concept with interested parties. (File 16).

We engaged a number of consultants to examine the present access to the law. Tony Doob of the Centre of Criminology helped us with experiments to see whether lay persons could, in fact, find their way around the present statute book. (They couldn’t.). A psychologist, Professor Paul Kolers, and an expert on linguistics, Harold Gleason, as well as experts in library science, Brian Land, Anne Schabas, Katherine Packer, and Alice Janisch, prepared papers for us. Various individuals assisted us in the preparation of models that could be examined. (File 17).

On February 8, 1974 I gave a speech on the concept to the Toronto Region Group of the Institute of Public Administration, which was excerpted in the Globe, and was widely reported in the Press. The paper was published in the Law Society of Upper Canada Gazette and Canadian Welfare. (Files 20 to 22).

In 1975, the book, Access to the Law, was published by Carswell/Methuen. Again, there was considerable interest in the concept by the press. See, in particular, the editorial by the Globe. (Files 23 and 24).

Although some progress has been made in developing the idea, the project remains unfulfilled. I had the chance of doing more on it when invited by the SSHRC in 1980 to submit a proposal on the project, but was unfortunately too involved at the time in other matters to take up their invitation. (Files 25 and 26).

The concept still makes excellent sense, particularly because of the Internet. It could be attempted by one province and the federal government to demonstrate that it could be done. In my study for the 1997 McCamus Legal Aid Review, I urged them to recommend such a scheme as part of the jurisdiction of the new Legal Services Commission. They did not do so. I also have urged people in South Africa, where there are very few lawyers, to study the scheme. The scheme remains to be tried in Canada or, indeed, in any other common-law jurisdiction.

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