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Archival description
University of Toronto Archives and Records Management Services Series
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Miscellaneous

Series consists of other posters for various events and announcements, including Board of Governor elections, hearings, examinations, contests, exhibitions, and new book announcements. See item listing for more details.

Student clubs and events

Series consists of posters for a variety of student clubs and events held at the university, including the United Nations Club, African Students of Ontario, West Indian Students’ Association, Liberal Club, Newman Club, Hart House, University College Literary and Athletic Society, Hungarian Students’ Association, Ukrainian Students’ Club, Student Christian Movement, Students’ Administrative Council, and many others. See item listing for more details.

Performances

Series consists of posters for performances of theatre, music, and poetry, as well as film screenings across the university. Groups covered include Hart House Theatre, Hart House Glee Club, The University of Toronto Symphony Orchestra, University of Toronto Chorus, Ontario College of Education, Victoria College Music Club, Trinity College Dramatic Society, and others. Some posters also serve as notices of auditions and rehearsals. See item listing for more details.

Lectures and conferences

Series consists of posters for lectures and conferences hosted by university offices, departments, faculties, and student/alumni groups. Topics in include science, astronomy, politics, archaeology, medicine, literature, history, philosophy, theatre, theology, law, current events, and higher education. See item listing for more details.

Research

This series contains material relating to Prof. York’s research activities. It includes experiment notes, schemas, lab data, and notes relating to various York publications and topics. This series contains reports, contracts, correspondence, and lab data relating to the U of T Geochronology Lab’s commercial work. Also included are 34 5.25 floppy disks but the digital files are unprocessed and not available for researcher use at this time. Please contact the Archives for more information.

Personal/biographical

This series contains material relating to Prof. York’s life. It includes a curriculum vitae from 1998 and a copy of the U of T National Report on Derek York and his work with laser probe argon-argon dating.

Manuscripts and publications

Ms Winearls has published widely on maps and map librarianship, beginning in 1967. This series consists of book reviews, articles, directories, exhibition catalogues, and chapters in books. A file in this series may contain draft of a manuscript, along with notes, covering correspondence, and reviews. The arrangement is chronological by date of publication.

Very few of Ms Winearls publications are missing from this series. The files relating to the writing of her major bibliographic work, Mapping Upper Canada, 1780-1867, are in Series 9. Files relating to Editing Early and Historical Atlases are found with the Conference on Editorial Problems files in Series 4.

A poster advertising the book, Ontario’s History in Maps (1984), which contains a cartobibliographic essay by Ms Winearls, “Sources for early maps in Ontario,” has been removed from B1998-0013/002(21) to /002(29).

Research files – Other projects

The principal research project in this series is described by Ms Winearls as “The mapping of western North America in the 19th century with particular reference to the De Fonte fantasy and the earlier ‘Sea of the West’ fantasy”. (The maps showed purported water routes between the west coast
and the Northwest Passage or the central North American plains.) This project was begun in the early 1990s but not completed as planned and led to an article on one particular map, “Thomas Jefferys Map of Canada and the mapping of the western part of North America, 1750-1768’, that appeared in 1996. The second research project is on carto-bibliographic analysis and methodology re 18th century printed maps of North America [1].

The series begins with map bibliography & notes, consisting of preliminary bibliographic entries for Mer de l’Ouest/Riviere Longue de l’Ouest, and an early draft of a bibliography of maps relating to the De Fonte fantasy, followed by files of maps arranged by area: World, Arctic, Western hemisphere, North America, and Canada. There are also source files with notes, correspondence, and copies of documents, maps and other source material, covering De Fonte, early Canadian maps, and archival sources in British Columbia, the United States and Europe. Much of the photocopied material that has been retained is annotated. These files are followed by research notes and correspondence on Northwest-De Fonte and biographical sources, and on related maps, along with requests for microform and maps. Included are reproductive copies of maps and other copies.

The files for the research project on carto-bibliographic analysis and methodology re 18th century printed maps of North America include sample entries, copies of maps and published bibliographies and sources (largely annotated), along with bibliographical analyses and North American maps sources for analysis. Some oversized maps are included.

The series ends with Ms Winearls’ research on book illustration in Canada for the History of the Book in Canada project. Three volumes were planned under the general editorship of Patricia Lockhart Fleming and Yvan Lamonde, and they appeared between 2004 and 2007. Ms Winearls’ contribution was to the first volume. The files contain correspondence, contracts, notes, and source material. Drafts of the manuscript are in Series 8.

B2016-0009 contains research Ms Winearls did on Canadian bird artist J. Fenwick Lansdowne from 2000-2013. Included are original photographs of the artist, interviews, notes, compiled bibliography and exhibition list. There is also collected photocopies of ephemera relating to the artist, reviews of his works and exhibition catalogues. Finally, Winearls collected copies of correspondence and contracts between Lansdowne and his agent Bud Feheley (restricted to 2026).

NOTES

[1] The descriptive portion of this series is drawn largely from notes provided by Ms Winearls in a container list she provided to the compiler of this inventory.

Conferences and exhibitions

This series documents the conferences on map librarianship in which Ms Winearls participated, exhibitions she prepared, and publications arising from them. It begins with several files containing correspondence and research notes on cartography and the early lithography of maps in Canada that Ms Winearls compiled between 1973 and 1998, and many of her applications to attend the conferences. Then follow the conferences and exhibits, the arrangement for which is generally alphabetical, beginning with the Association of Canadian Map Librarians 1993 workshop on the cataloguing rare maps.

Next is a file on the formative years (1975-1978) of the Canadian Cartographic Association and its History of Cartography Interest Group. This group drew on the formation three years earlier of a working group on the history of cartography within the International Cartographic Association. Ms Winerals was the co-ordinator of the cartobibliography section of the ICA, which organized the 11th International Conference on the History of Cartography in Ottawa in 1985. The files on this conference contain correspondence, notes, programs, and the papers presented by some of the participants. Also included are files on the Working Group on Cartobibliography’s proposal to

publish as a manual Coolie Verner’s manuscript on carto-bibliography. There also files on the ICHC conferences in 1987, 1989, and 1991. This part of the series ends with a file from 1992 for a project on cataloguing maps. All of these files are in B1998-0012, boxes 012 and 013, files 01-04.

In 1984, in conjunction with the sesquicentennial celebrations of the City of Toronto, Ms Winerals was invited to be a guest curator for an exhibit at the Canadiana Gallery of the Royal Ontario Museum, “Mapping Toronto’s first century, 1787-1884.” The files [B1998-0013/013(05) – (13), /014(01) – (02)], trace the development of the exhibition and include drafts of the catalogue and photographs. There is also a diary [B1996-0021/003(05)] that she kept while planning the exhibition.

Ms Winearls began attending meeting of the Conference on Editorial Problems in 1991 as convenor of its 29th annual conference in 1993 that coincided with the publication of The Historical Atlas of Canada. The title of the conference was “Editing early and historical atlases”. In conjunction with the conference she mounted an exhibition, “The atlas as a book”, in the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library. She also edited a volume of selected conference papers that was published by the University of Toronto Press in 1995. Most of the files are in B1998-0013 but there is one in B2007-0015.

The Conference files contain minutes, correspondence, grant applications, editing notes, drafts of the papers published, and reviews. The exhibition files contain background notes, research files for each exhibition case, collations, and drafts of the catalogue.

Finally, Ms Winearls curated an exhibit in the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library called “Art on the Wing” in 1999. Records includes notes on cases, drafts and final copy of the catalogue as well her lecture. The Conference files contain minutes, correspondence, grant applications, editing notes, drafts of the papers published, and reviews. The exhibition files contain background notes, research files for each exhibition case, collations, and drafts of the catalog.

Biographical and personal

This series contains files with Joan Winearls' curriculum vitae and other information on professional activities, followed by several files of professional correspondence, including commentary on specific manuscripts. There are also files on her employment at the University of Toronto and her applications for research leave, on the Historical Atlas of Canada project, and relating to her consultative position with the Legislative Library of Ontario in 1983. The series concludes with several files on honours and awards bestowed on her.

Research, publications and presentations

Series consists of records related to Joan and Frederick Winter’s archaeological research, particularly their study of Pausauias’ travels. Material includes typescripts, background research material, and images. In addition to a published article, a significant portion of the material documents the presentation of the couple’s research through scripts, a ‘photographic companion’ (annotated) album, and slides.

Research and publishing

Series consists of material related to the publishing and research activity of Frederick Winter. Included within the material are articles and book reviews, as well as correspondence and notes related to Winter’s research. Additionally, some records relate to the doctoral work of Frederick Winter.

Graphic records

Includes portraits of Williams, a photo of him as a lab assistant doing war research (1941), receiving the Dunlop Award (1977), in a laboratory (1979), a classroom, at a departmental luncheon, and on retreat. Also includes a photo of the Polymer Corp. Plant.

Photographs

This series consists of photographs belonging to Dr. Welsh representing his professional life.

Publishing projects

This series includes records created and collected while editing and/or writing literary works. Files contain correspondence with publishers and often with the authors of the original work. There is also correspondence relating to primary sources and with other academics or people familiar with the work being edited as well as with contributors. Files also contain research notes, bibliographies, reviews, publishing contracts and draft manuscripts.

Of particular note is correspondence with poet James Reaney along with his originally designed Christmas cards from him and his wife Colleen Thibaudeau. Early correspondence relates to his book Poems edited by Germaine Warkentin in 1972 but continues well into the 1990s and is often of a personal nature. Photographs of James Reaney at John Warkentin’s retirement party can be found in B2002-0006/001P (01).

In 1976 Uof T Press reprinted The White Savannahs by W.E. Collin as part of the series Literature in Canada: Poetry and Prose in Reprint. Warkentin wrote the introduction and in doing so corresponded with Collin as well as with poets Al Purdy, Leo Kennedy, A.J.M Smith, Frank Scott and Dorothy Livesay.

In 2001 Warkentin’s edited work Decentring the Renaissance: Canada and Europe in multidisciplinary perspective, 1500-1700 was published. This book was based on papers presented at a conference in 1976, organized by Warkentin and sponsored by the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies at Victoria College. Records in this series document the conference along with the subsequent publication and include files on funding, correspondence with contributors, readers and the publisher.

Warkentin was also involved in the publishing project, The History of the Book in Canada. Included is correspondence, reports, drafts and planning documents.

Photographs

Series consists of images of Prof. Venkatacharya and his colleagues, in addition to family portraits. Images cover multiple trips to India, including to Srisailam, the presentation of Prof. Venkatacharya’s honorary degree at Rashtriya Sanskrit Vidyapeetha, as well as formal portraits of Tuppil and Vijaya Venkatacharya.

Department of Fine Art

Between 1957 and 1985, Marion Walker was a professor in the history of stage and costume design in the Department of Fine Art and its Graduate Centre for the Study of Drama. In this capacity, she taught Stage Design (FAS 333Y) and 18th Century Stage Design (FAS 435). She also assisted in the staging of the Graduate Centre for the Study of Drama’s 1974 productions of Marsh Hay and T’is a Pity She’s a Whore.

The records in this series document Ms. Walker’s teaching and research activities in the Department of Fine Art. The textual records mainly consist of subject files containing research and lectures notes. Topics covered include: correspondence, Baroque theatre, Ferdinando Bibiena, Comedia dell’ Arte, Elizabethan theatre, Fratelli Galliari, Greek theatre, Filippo Juvarra, Renaissance theatre, opera, research grants and Wagner’s The Ring. Also included is a scrapbook commemorating Ms. Walker’s retirement from the Department in 1985.

This series also consists of approximately 130 slides used to teach the History of Stage and 18th Century Stage Design. Subjects include the stage designs of Marsh Hay, Ferdinando Bibiena, Filippo Juvarra, Fratelli Gallieri and Pietro Gonzaga.

Also included are 10 stage plans created by Ms. Walker for the Graduate Centre for the Study of Drama’s 1974 productions of Marsh Hay and T’is a Pity She’s a Whore.

The series also contains one scrapbook of costume designs for the Graduate Centre for the Study of Drama’s production of Fuente Ovejuna (The Sheep Well), [n.d.].

Hart House Theatre

Marion Walker was Production Assistant at Hart House Theatre from 1946 to 1957. Under the directorship of Robert Gill, she designed sets and costumes for each of the Theatre’s annual four plays. Her first production was St. Joan, starring Charmian King. Other early performers who worked with Ms. Walker at Hart House Theatre included Kate Reid, Donald Sutherland, and William Hutt.

The records in this series pertain to Ms. Walker’s involvement with Hart House Theatre. Textual records include scripts 1946, annotated Hart House Theatre programmes 1946 – 1957, and obituaries for Robert Gill, 1974.

Series also includes approximately 100 photographs of various productions for which Ms. Walker designed costumes and sets. The photographs depict various scenes, actors and set designs. Productions represented are: Romeo and Juliet, 1947; Julius Caesar, 1948; the Seagull, 1948; The Skin of Our Teeth, 1948, The Doctor’s Dilemma, 1948; Crime and Punishment, 1949; Othello, 1949; Fortune My Foe, 1950; The Guardsman, 1950; Captain Brassbound’s Conversion, 1950; Medea, 1950; Henry IV, 1950; Marco Millions, 1950; Richard II, 1951; Pygmalion, 1951; The Madwoman of Chaillot, 1951; The Admirable Crichton, 1952; The Winslow Boy, 1952; Macbeth, 1952; The Wild Duck, 1953; The School for Wives, 1956; and The Innocent, 1957.

Series also contains 8 sketchbooks of costume designs for the following Hart House productions: The Internal Machine, 1946; Othello, 1949; Medea, 1950; Richard II, 1951; School for Wives, 1956; Hamlet, [n.d.]; and King Lear, [n.d.].

Early biographical information

The records in this series provide biographical information on Marion Walker’s early life, 1921-1942. Series includes 7 photographs. Subjects are: 5 portraits of Marion Walker; the Phi Beta sorority, 1940; and the University College graduating class, 1942. Also included is a scrapbook of newspaper clippings concerning Ms. Walker’s amateur golfing activities, 1937-1941.

Student reports and theses

This series consists of student projects collected by van Ginkel over the years. Included are examples of theses, theses programs and drafts, technical reports, mounted exhibits. This is a multimedia series consisting of textual records, architectural drawings, photographs and slides. Along with Series VI, this series best documents what was taught within the Faculty, how it was taught and how this knowledge was interpreted and applied by individual students. Most of the records are from the late 1980s but there are some projects that date back to the early 1960s which were probably collected during the Centenary exhibit, Restatements and Realizations.

Exhibition files

Files relating to the mounting of exhibits by faculty and students, most notably Connaitre/Reconnaitre Le Corbusier exhibit in 1987 and Restatements and Realizations: Built work of graduates of the School since 1893, put together by van Ginkel as part of the Centenary Celebrations.

The general administrative files around borrowing, lending and mounting exhibits are filed at the beginning of this series, followed by the specific administrative files on the above mentioned exhibits. Finally, files relating to exhibits borrowed and mounted at the Faculty's gallery are arranged in chronological order.

This series contains photographs, negatives and slides documenting the mounting of exhibits in the Faculty of Architecture including the 1983 exhibit on Le Corbusier and the school's centenary exhibit "Restatement and Realizations: Built work of graduates of the School since 1893". All photographs, slides and negatives have been removed, placed in their own files and boxed separately. In such cases, a SEPARATION NOTICE has been inserted to indicate the existence of graphic materials.

Photographs and slides

The photographs, slides and contact prints in this series consist mainly of images associated with the textual records and usually removed from them. The arrangement relates directly to the textual series of which they are part and then arranged chronologically within.

Manuscripts and publications

Professor Urban’s writings focus on the relationship between art and architectural design. Six of his publications are present in this series. Some of those that appeared before 1986 and all published afterward are absent. His earliest writing are based on his involvement with Networks Limited in Halifax, then on collaboration with New York City artist Brian Boigon, and finally on his research in Italy in the 1980s.

Lectures and criticism

Frederic Urban gave a number of addresses as a visiting artist and lecturer. In 1979 he was a visiting artist at Ohio State University, where he photographed a number of student street performances. In October 1981 he was guest lecturer with the Venice Study Abroad Program run by the Department of Architecture at the University of Toronto. The following year he was a guest lecturer at University College in the University of Toronto for Larry Richard’s course, “Introduction to architecture”. In 1984 and 1985 he gave lectures
on his Sacri Monti project at Carleton University and the University of Toronto. In 1991 he
was a visiting lecturer at the University of Wisconsin at Stout. Some of the addresses are documented in this series. For related correspondence, see Series 2.

Professor Urban was a member of the Board of Directors of the Sharon Temple Museum Society from 1996 to 2001 and he and Larry were invited to participate in a series of readings and performances.

Studio work, exhibitions and performances

This series begins with Frederick Urban’s formative years as an artist when he created a large number of exhibits and participated in some performance pieces, primarily in Halifax and New York City. For some of these, he drew on his personal experiences. Two examples are An Acadian genealogy (April 1977), inspired by his family roots in the Acadian region of Brunswick, and Monk (July 1977) by his training as a novice in 1961-1962.

The files cover his years at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (1976-1977), continue through his post-graduate studies at the Whitney Museum of American Art, his interest in the art and architecture of Italy (spurred on by his meeting Giuseppe Panza di Biumo), and several installations connected to Canadian architecture and architectural history. The last exhibition, ‘The place of work’, accompanied the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada’s annual conference in Winnipeg in 1989. The arrangement is primarily chronological.

The series ends with several files on performance pieces, the most significant being Anne Wilson and her Butler’s lives of the saints, which was performed both in Halifax and New York City, and an oversized folder of posters for exhibitions and performance pieces collected by Urban.

Some of the exhibitions and performance pieces contain correspondence, drawings and sketches, photographs and/or slides. A number are represented by a combination of photographs and slides or slides alone, with no textual accompaniment. There are also several oversized folders of sketches and drawings for of posters for exhibitions and performance pieces with which Urban was involved and one of posters for events which he may have attended but to which he did not contribute.

Research

Frederick Urban had a passionate interest in the art and architecture of Italy and much of his research, after his studies at the Whitney Museum of Modern Art, was focussed on that country. He received grants for two projects in Italy, “The Sacri Monti of Northern Italy” (1985-1989) and for his “House/Custoza” project (1985). The other principal grants funded his visiting professorship at Nanjing Institute of Technology/South East University in Nanjing, China in 1987 and 1988, the files for which are found in Series 4.

This series begins with general files on the Sacri Monti research project, including corres-pondence and grant applications, literature, maps, general research material, photographs, posters, and some tracings. There are also files for each year that Urban was in Italy, arranged chronologically. They document his itinerary and contain correspondence, a sampling of programs and brochures, programs for the Biennale of Venice (1985), and one journal (1986).

The series ends with files on exhibitions and performances of interest, along with a selection of slides, photoprints, postcards and posters. There is a folder of cards, notices and programs for a number of exhibitions and performances, primarily Canadian (1978-1992), followed by cards and catalogues for particular exhibits: Christo (1979-1982), Creative Time (including Butler’s lives of the saints), Garry Neil Kennedy, Miami University Art Museum, The New Yorker, and Andy Warhol/Jamie Wyeth. The slides are of ‘design elements’, raves in Toronto, the Toronto Sculpture Garden, and ‘Women study’. The photoprints are of streetscapes in Toronto, taken in the early 1980s. There are ‘Special postcards’ [design elements] collected by Urban, postcards of photographs taken by the British photographer, Frank Sutcliffe, ‘Die einrichtungen der Akaademie der Kűnste der DDR’ (1979), and ‘The theatre of architecture’ by Susan Speigel (Toronto, 1986).

Employment

The records in this series document Frederic Urban’s employment record up to 1999. There are files on his public school teaching in Massachusetts, his being a director of Networks Ltd. in Halifax, his years at the University of Waterloo, including his visiting professorship in
China, his year as a director of the S. L. Simpson Gallery, and his employment by the University of Toronto. The arrangement is by position of employment.

The first few files contain primarily correspondence and, in the case of his employment at the University of Waterloo, outlines of courses he taught, Architecture 192 and 193.
There are, in addition, a large number of slides relating to his teaching activities there. The
material relating to Urban’s years at the University of Toronto consists almost entirely of teaching slides.

Urban was occasionally asked to photograph the work of architects and designers. The two examples in this series are from 1982: photographs of “Haig House” as redesigned by George Baird and slides of Melvin Charney’s A Toronto Construction, built at 139 King Street East.

The last three boxes of this series document Urban’s activities as visiting professor, Nanjing Institute of Technology (renamed South East University in May 1988), Nanjing, China, in 1987 and 1988. The files contain correspondence relating to the exchange program and with professors and students, background material, briefing books, journals, lecture notes and student exercises, exhibition material, memorabilia, the report Urban wrote on his return, and press clippings. Accompanying these files is a selection of photographs and slides. Box 011 contains the drawings done by his students.

The series ends with files on the S. L. Simpson Gallery and slides used for lectures at the University of Toronto between 1992 and 1999. The slides are arranged by year, where identified as such.

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