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Archival description
University of Toronto Archives and Records Management Services Series
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Slides

This series includes slides most likely used to illustrate lectures, publications and possibly CBC programs in which he was involved. Most slides are undated but or identified as to their site location. There is also one box of slides of architectural student projects.

Negatives

These are mainly 35 mm strip negatives mostly likely relating to the photos in series above although a relationship is not easily established. There are two sets:

B2001-0044/003P
515 negatives: colour
Most are European photographs but the number system does not match those found in Series 8 (Europe 1964 photos). Most were probably taken for vault research and have been cut and resorted according to location and architectural characteristics. There are also photographs of proposed plans for Toronto City Hall and other buildings in the Toronto area.

B2001-0044/010P
Approx. 1500-2000 negatives: b&w
These are rolls of black and white negatives. Approximately half are photos and drawn figures for the Gothic Vault. Others are images of various buildings and architectural drawings and models. Unlike most of the images in other series, these are completely unidentified and may have served as a preservation set.

Maritime photographs

These photographs of maritime architecture in Canada, include external and internal views of government buildings, historical sites, streetscapes, industrial buildings, churches and old homes. These were most likely taken around 1962 and were used for several publications including Building by the Sea and The Maritimes. Cities most widely represented in this series include Quebec City, St John N.B, St. Andrews N.B., Dorchester N.B., Fredericton N.B., Charlottetown P.E.I, Halifax N.S., Lunenburg N.S., St. Johns Nfld., Petty Harbour Nfld..

This series consists of b&w proofs and larger b&w and colour prints. Proofs are arranged by their original number order and are identified by town and building. Larger prints have been grouped by their geographic location of province and town.

Photographs of European trip

These photographs were taken by Acland during a trip to Europe in 1964 and document the architecture and landscape of various cities. These images would have been used for research and to illustrate several published works including a series of articles entitled “Building and Land:…” in Canadian Architect starting in 1968. Interior photographs of cathedrals and churches would have also formed the basis for his research on vaults, some of which were reproduced in his 1972 book Medieval Structure : The Gothic Vault.

Countries documented in this series include: Central European countries such as Czechoslovakia, Poland, Hungary; England; France; Greece; the Islamic Middle East such as Turkey, Iran and Egypt; Italy, Portugal, Spain and Yugoslavia. There are also photographs of Nigeria taken by a photographer Grant Wanzel. These are included here because they were originally filed with the European photographs.

Vault photographs

These images are those selected mainly for printing in Acland’s book, Medieval Structure : the Gothic Vault. University of Toronto Press, 1972. Some may not have actually made it into the final printing. They show architectural features of various structures throughout Europe, Africa and the Middle East. Originally these were probably taken around the same time as European photographs described in Series 8 – possibly during the same trip since many of the places are common to both series of prints.

This series contains the following arrangement:

/004P 247 photoprints: b&w ; 8x10 or smaller
4 photoprints: colour ; 8x10 or smaller
Mainly 8x10s these prints were identified as “European Arches”. Most are identified by location and have therefore been sorted alphabetically by place name. Except for a small number, Acland was the photographer. Some are numbered and mostly likely correspond to their use in the book but the correlation is unclear since the illustrations in the book are not numbered.

/004P 31 photoprints: b&w ; 8x10
These prints were originally arranged by chapter and this arrangement has been kept. Notations made by Acland on the back often note the page number.

/005P- 197 negatives: b&w ; 8x10

/007P These are enlarged negatives likely used for printing. Each is individually foldered since adhesive from the tape used to border their edges has made them tacky. Originally, all would have been sorted by chapter but this arrangement was lost. Whatever arrangement existed was maintained and where possible folders are annotated with the page number. The original folder has also been kept since it lists all images found in that chapter. Negatives not matched to their chapters are filed in Box /007. It is possible that some of these may not have been used in the book.

/001P 57 negatives : b&w ; 4x3.5 or smaller
29 negatives : colour ; 21/4’ x 21/4”
These are mostly original negatives of vaults many of which Acland identified. Some appear to copy negatives. There is no particular arrangement although original groupings were maintained.

Photographs and negatives

Series consists mainly copy prints collected of historical photographs of the Physics department. Most were in an album and page numbers are indicated on the folders. Some originals are included.

Photographs

B2003-0024/001P:

  • Photographs and slides, unidentified and identified, relating to research projects and writings, with no associated textual records. Includes photos for Anderson’s 1968 paper, “The Serpent Mounds site physical anthropology”, Royal Ontario Museum Arts and Archaeology Division Occasional Paper 11.

B2003-0024/002P:

  • Basal view of skulls (6), including El Risco and Donaldson sites
  • “Dallas”, site 117 (?). Two panels of six cranial photos each

Academic activity files

This series contains documents pulled together by Prof. Armatage for her tenure review as well as for subsequent yearly reviews. Files contain mainly professional correspondence, descriptive reports on research and teaching activities, yearly activity reports and clippings about her work. There is information on promotions, awards, research leaves and grants. Clippings in this series also give evidence to Prof. Armatage’s work outside mainstream academia including her role as a documentary filmmaker and curator for the Toronto International Film Festival.

Professional activities

This series documents various professional activities and research including participation in conferences, film festivals and screenings, and particularly Prof. Armatage’s work within the Major Collaborative Research Initiatives Program. The series includes her correspondence with a small number of notable women filmmakers, including Dorothy Arzner and Tracey Moffatt, as well as posters, programs, and pamphlets on women and cinema collected over the course of her professional career. There is also one file relating to her time teaching in Japan in 2002.

Filmmaking

This series contains the original film elements for several films made by Kay Armatage.
There are also files documenting this facet of her career including correspondence, film proposals, research notes, clippings, grant applications, budget reports, shot lists and scripts. Several files document her films Striptease, Storytelling and Artist on Fire, as well as Prof. Armatage’s attempt at writing and directing a film about Nell Shipman which did not go beyond development.

Photographs in this series include shots taken during the production of several of her films. There is one file documenting the filming of Storytelling which includes shots of Northrop Frye in New York City. There are also three contact sheets by Babette Mangolte taken during the making of Artist on Fire, with views of Joyce Weiland’s Toronto studio and home. The series also contains one file of printing plates used in the creation of publicity material for Prof. Armatage’s early film Jill Johnson, October 1975.

External professional activities

For most of his active career, Dr. Baker was involved with organizations related to his specialty in paediatrics and later native health. This series contains files documenting his involvement with the Canadian Paediatric Society including his chairmanship of the Indian and Inuit Health Committee. These files include minutes of meetings, drafts of papers, notes and correspondence. Also included are files on the Council of Faculties of Medicine of Ontario and the Northern Ontario Committee which he chaired from 1992 to 1997. There is also one file of the Canadian Psychiatric Association relating to a meeting in September 1989.

Professional organizations

This small series encompasses three professional organizations with which Professor Barbour was involved. There is a slim folder of correspondence from when he was editor of the Canadian Mathematical Bulletin, and extensive files on the Gelfand Club of Ontario, a correspondence program founded in 1969 by Professor Israel Halperin of the University of Toronto “to provide resource material for able secondary school students interested in mathematics and to encourage them to correspond with mathematicians.” Professor Barbeau took over the program in January 1970 and ran it until October, 1978. The files contain notes, problem sets, and answers.

There are also three slim files on his involvement with the Mathematical Association of America, including its joint meeting in Toronto in 1976 and short courses Professor Barbeau offered for it in 1991 and 1993.

Biographical and personal records

The series consists of biographical and personal records of Professor Bay. The material reflects his personal life, and includes press clippings, articles, and a thesis about him; personal documents such as educational records; documents of identification; personal papers related to life events (baptism, marriage, home ownership, inheritance, death certificates); calendars and a condolence scrapbook.

The arrangement of the material begins with biographical information (press clippings, biographies, curriculum vitae, referees, work about Bay), then personal papers, followed by what he termed “his personal collection”, consisting of items primarily in Norwegian relating to his family and Norway generally. The most intriguing portion of this “collection” is the folders of “illegal papers” [/002(28) – (30)] that Professor Bay buried when he hurriedly left Norway early in World War II and which he dug up sometime after he returned. There are also books about Norwegian resistance, and two books by his uncle.

Correspondence

This series contains letters written to Professor Bay by members of his family and friends, as well as professional correspondence. The correspondence is largely personal in nature in early years but becomes mainly professional in later years. The material includes replies sent by Bay. Approximately a third to half of the material is written in Norwegian.

Boxes B2014-0010/006-/038 were arranged by Professor Bay. This arrangement consists of grouping correspondence by several months at the time and then arranging the correspondence in alphabetical order. The remaining correspondence boxes were then divided by professional or personal nature, and by language when possible, and arranged chronologically. In the correspondence with the notations “Parts I and II”, Professor Bay usually included lists of his correspondents. This system broke down in the last couple of years of his life.

Academia and teaching materials

This series documents some of Professor Bay’s academic and associated activities. It includes teaching material (reading lists, syllabi, lectures, and exams) and his work within academia (committee work, appraisals and references, and departmental involvement) at the various universities where he taught. The files on “referees and appraisals” at the University of Toronto include references for academics and students and comments on books and articles forwarded to him for his input. Also included are files on the proposal to abolish the death penalty in California and, in particular, the attempt to stop the execution of convicted murderer and rapist, Caryl Chessman; and copies of "Key List Mailing: Selected Documents of Current and Lasting Interest in the Civil Rights Movement", a biweekly publication produced by the San Francisco Regional Office of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).

Additional material related to academia and teaching material may be located in the correspondence series. Material related to his research in addresses and publications is located in the publications series. Material related to his involvement in professional associations can be found in the professional association series.

Photographs

This series primarily consists of portraits and family photographs. Some photographs have inscriptions on the back. This series reflects Professor Bay’s personal life and also provides a few graphic records of his professional activities.

Personal correspondence

This series contains mainly correspondence received by Clara Benson from family and friends. Two files contain correspondence that is undated, but seems to be predominantly created prior to her retirement in 1945. Correspondents include, among others, letters from her parents, her brother Bingley, her sisters Constance, Jessie, and Ethel, cousins, school friends, professors such as A. B. Macallum, and colleagues such as Professor Annie Laird. Subjects discussed include studies at University of Toronto, congratulations on her doctorate in 1903, postcards home to family about her trip to Europe in 1904, and 1910-1913, matters relating to her involvement on the Executive Committee of the Student Volunteer Movement for Foreign Missions (1912), and other professional and academic activities. Also includes file of correspondence about and from French children sponsored by Dr. Benson such as Maryse Deslandes and Madeleine Killian (1958-1964).

Other activities

In 1921, Dr. Benson was elected the first president of the Women’s Athletic Association of University of Toronto and was involved from the beginning in the campaign to build an athletic building for women. Among the records relating to this activity are correspondence, notes, financial statements and blueprints of proposed buildings. Also included in this series are correspondence, minutes and reports relating to her work as Chair of the Foreign Committee of the YWCA (Young Women’s Christian Association) focusing primarily on an international survey on leadership (1930-1932). Other documents include two undated and unsigned manuscripts of stories, a collection of cards acquired during a trip to the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893, and a scrapbook of pressed flowers with identification collected by Clara Benson ca 1890’s.

Photographs

This series contains a small number of loose photos, some of which would have been collected, others taken by Dr. Benson. Early snapshots relate to Benson’s summer at Muskoka, the Blake summer residence, La Maison Rouge and La Caprice and her trip(s) to Europe. This series also contain 2 photo albums documenting the Benson/Blake families including trips, summer homes, Terralta, Port Hope.

Correspondence

This extensive series contains both personal and professional correspondence received by Prof Berger during his academic career. Some of Prof. Berger’s draft replies will be found in later files. The earliest letters document his doctoral education and his appointment to the Department of History at the University of Toronto. Correspondence from the 1970s through the 1990s document his flourishing career as prominent historian, author, teacher and advisor, etc. Later correspondence is dominated by requests from editors and other scholars relating to his publications, requests for review of other manuscripts, as well as his history of the Royal Society (1996)

Correspondents include, among others, prominent academics such as Prof. Ray MacLean, Dept. of History, St. Francis Xavier University (b 1927 d. 2004), Prof. Ramsay Cook, George (now Sir George) S. Bain, a former classmate at the University of Manitoba and member of Board of Bombardier Aerospace, as well as former students such as Doug Owram (professor, University of Alberta 1976-2006), and colleagues at Canadian and foreign universities. Subjects include personal information about family, friends and colleagues, academic correspondence with students and other academics about research progress, requests for letters of reference and support, comments on recent publications, and other academic activities. Two files at the end of this series contain letters to single correspondents: M. Brook Taylor (1986-2006) former student and faculty member in Department of History, Mount St.Vincent University and Sam Waller, amateur historian and founder of the Sam Waller Museum in The Pas, Manitoba.

Professional activities

This series contains primarily correspondence files relating to various topics or events. Among the files are his appointment file for the University of Toronto containing personal information relating to salary and promotion (initially as Lecturer in 1964), as well as a copy of his curriculum vitae. Other files document awards and honours, external activities relating participation in conferences and associations, as well as administrative duties with the University of Toronto. In addition to correspondence, files may contain project proposals, reports, manuscripts of papers and some photographs.

Graphic material

Includes images documenting machinery for induction heating at the Ajax Magnethermic Corporation and views of other plants and machinery such as Davey United of Sheffield England and Washington Steel. A series of slides document research-taking place in the University of Toronto, Electronic Engineering Department in 1966. There are a few views of Biringer at work.

Photographs

Series includes several formal portraits of Christine Bissell including two done by photographer Josef Karsh as well as a snapshot of Christine with family members.

Photographs

Panoramic photograph taken on the balcony of Tienamen Square, Beijing, China, 1 May 1962. Dr. Bissell is on the left of the rear row. Identifications on the backing of the photograph.

Cartoons on Bissell

This series contains 13 original cartoons chronicling Claude Bissell’s career drawn by Globe and Mail political cartoonist James (Jamie) Reidford. The Reidfords’ were close friends of the Bissells’.

Also included in this series are a few copies of cartoons again depicting Bissell that appeared in the Globe and Mail by other cartoonists.

Photographs

Photographs document all aspects of Bissell’s life. Formal portraits of Bissell have been filed at the beginning of this series followed by a chronological arrangement of group portraits, events and ceremonies. Several photographs document visiting dignitaries to the University while Bissell was president. This series also includes photographs of Bissell’s trip to China in 1962.

Ernest Buckler

This series contains extensive documentation on Claude Bissell's research and relationship with Canadian poet Ernest Buckler including a typescript and related publication letters relating to his book Ernest Buckler Remembered (University of Toronto Press, 1989).

Bible Project

Series consists of records relating to the Bible project of Peter Brieger and Jürgen Paul. The original idea of the project was to compile a complete collection of photographs of French and English illustrated Bibles produced between the end of the eleventh century and around the year 1270, with a focus on the iconography of their illustrations. The project likely began in the late 1950s. In 1965, Dr. Brieger met Dr. Jürgen Paul, who moved to Toronto, from Germany, in 1967 to help Dr. Brieger finish the book.

Dr. Paul helped define the focus of the book, from a multi-volume corpus of all illustrations, to a study of “questions of iconography, the variety and development in the choice of subjects for illustrating the biblical books, and to concentrate on the Old Testament. It was to be demonstrated how over the period of the two centuries changes in subjects of illustration selected were influenced by changes in Christian theological exegesis of the Old Testament.” [1] The pair worked together in an office in Sydney Smith Hall during the winter and spring of 1967/68.

The pair later organized trips to several repositories to examine manuscripts. As Dr. Paul writes, “I had already realized that the material of French and English illustrated Bible manuscripts was still incomplete. Therefore, during the summer of 1968 we, together with Mrs. Brieger, spent several weeks in England checking the college libraries in Oxford and Cambridge. It turned out that in both universities large numbers of most interesting Bible manuscripts existed that were not even registered. No catalogues existed. After the stay in England we went by car through France checking the manuscript collections in Paris and provincial libraries between Avranches and Dijon. After that, we went to Italy checking the manuscripts in the Vatican library and in Laurenziana in Florence.”

When Dr. Brieger’s health began to fail, Dr. Paul continued the project, to a lesser degree, with Ann Hilty. The project was never published.


[1] From an account written by Dr. Paul. The full account can be found in the case file for B2016-0007.

Graphic material

Photographs document members of the Blake and Wrong families including Samuel H. Blake and his wife Rebecca Blake, Edward Blake and Gerald Blake, as well as cousins Murray, Hume and Harold Wrong. Most are studio portraits, some of which are unidentified. There is one album depicting life at the summer residences Point au Pic and Murray Bay.

Slides and pictures

Box 002P: Canadian History Slide collection: 12 double-trays of slides containing 1,216 black-and-white and colour illustrations relating to the widest possible number of subjects in Canadian history. Printed list of the contents. [includes double tray of slides (#501-600) removed from box 012 – note by Harold Averill].

Box 003P: Smallpox slide collection: Two double-trays containing 93 slides of illustrations relating to the Montreal smallpox epidemic of 1885; compiled to illustrate Plague: A Story of Smallpox in Montreal. Printed list of slides. (Some, but not all of these slides were made from prints in the folder in Box 24)

Prints, negatives, relating to themes in Canadian business history – and general history. 3 folders, approx 300 pictures. Most of these were accumulated as possible illustrations for Northern Enterprise: Five Centuries of Canadian Business; most came from collections I had access to as described above. Some of the best of the prints were made into slides, as above; but not all.

Personal

Davidson Black kept a diary throughout much of his adult life. There are 28 volumes in this series. The earliest is for 1902, the year he entered medicine at the University of Toronto; it includes a tally of monthly expenses. The last diary is for 1934, the final entry being for 9 March, six days before his death. For each of the years 1922 and 1925, there are two volumes of diaries. There are no diaries present for the years 1907, 1908, 1909, 1911, and 1912. The diary Davidson kept while on active service during World War I is filed with his service records in Series 4. Most of the entries are brief as the diaries, except for 1902, are small. Some of the loose entries with the diaries are longer.

A number of items document his personal activities. The earliest is a small well-thumbed copy of 'The Book of Common Prayer', presented to him by his mother on his 9th birthday in 1893. A notebook, a journal, and permits document his early interest in ornithology. Finally, there are files of memorabilia, poems and sketches, and on honours bestowed on him later in life, along with twelve diplomas and certificates.

Education

This series contains certificates and diplomas, correspondence, course and lab notes, term papers and memorabilia documenting aspects of Davidson Black’s education, running from the Wellesley School through Harbord Collegiate and the Faculties of Medicine and Arts at the University of Toronto. There is also a file on Davidson’s summer project in 1907 to earn money for his Bachelor of Arts program, prospecting in the Temagami Forest Reserve.

Employment

Except for photographs, this series contains little documentation on Davidson Black’s employment before 1917 when he enlisted with the Canadian Army Medical Corps and went overseas. The bulk of this series relates to his work in China at the Peking Union Medical College, his anthropological research including his discovery of "Peking man", and his travels within China and to Mongolia, India, Siam, and elsewhere.

The files contain correspondence, photographs, addresses, and publications (including some drafts), and memorabilia. Most of the photographs were taken by Dr. Black himself, though some were taken by Adena and others (especially presentation copies) by friends and colleagues. Dr. Black carefully annotated many of the photos he took, often in considerable detail even to the time of day and the shutter speed used. Included are a few glass-plate negatives and about 50 lantern slides. The negatives are usually dated and were kept except if they were in good condition. On his travels, Dr. Black collected autographed photographs of many of the scientists and academics he met; these are included in this series.

Correspondence and biographical

Consists of correspondence with colleagues, publishers, and his wife. Also includes a framed letter from Duncan Campbell Scott, 2 annotated books, educational diplomas and certificates, memoirs, scrapbooks, graduation robes, and various medals.

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