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University of St. Michael's College, John M. Kelly Library, Special Collections
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Photographs of Nouwen's trip to Greece

File consists of 138 slides of Nouwen's trip to Greece with several unidentified friends. Slides depict mainly local scenes and scenery, and were previously housed in four slide trays each labelled "Griekenland" I - IV.

Jack Stroh photographs

Jack Stroh's photographs are comprised of 156 photographs, and their negatives, created by Stroh. They document visits, celebrations, and events. They are organized into the following groupings:

1) 53 photographs of Nouwen, Sue Stroh and L'Arche Japan member Gordon Nakamura visiting Henri Nouwen at L'Arche Daybreak. Negative included.

2) 1 photograph of Nouwen and Jack Stroh accompanied by a signed card by Nouwen. Negatives included.

3) 20 photographs of Jasper and Cathleen Naus' wedding and wedding reception. Includes photographs of Nouwen performing the wedding and Sue Stroh. Negatives included.

4) 11 photographs housed in folder titled "Christmas" that document a Christmas party. Includes photographs of Sue and Jack Stroh, and Nouwen.

5) 24 photographs housed in a folder titled "1997 Daybreak Ground Breaking" that document the groundbreaking and festivities. Negatives included.

6) 24 photographs of the Nouwen wake, an undisclosed grave site and post-funeral reception. Negatives included.

7) 11 photographs of L'Arche core-members and members as well as photographs of Sue and Jack Stroh, and Nouwen. Negatives included.

8) 12 miscellaneous photographs, mostly featuring Henri Nouwen, but also featuring Sue Stroh as well as images of grave sites.

Stroh, Jack

A.l.s. from Émile Zola to Édouard Fournier

  1. A.l.s. from Émile Zola to Édouard Fournier (1819-1880), [Paris], 20 November 1865, 3 p. – on letterhead «Librairie de L. Hachette et Cie, Boulevard Saint-Germain, 77», crossed out.
    Zola writes to Fournier, a journalist who wrote for a number of Paris newspapers, to request that Fournier read and comment on Zola’s new (and his first) novel, La Confession de Claude in Fourier’s upcoming literary column in La Patrie.
    In this letter, Zola’s keen sense of how to create publicity for his works is already evident, since he tells Fournier that he will not be upset if Fournier gives an honest opinion of his work. “It goes without saying, writes Zola, that I prefer a frank evaluation to a couple of indulgent lines.”
    Published in Correspondance, vol. 1, p. 422-423 (letter 129).
    This is a very significant letter, not only because of its content but also because letters from this period (the 1860’s) are relatively rare.

Photocopies (Zola)

-“Musique d'Offenbach”, photocopy a.s., signed Emile Zola. No indication of provenance. 2 p.
-“Pauvre prince”, photocopy. Fragment, in Zola's hand. No indication of provenance. 2 p.
-“La Madeleine”, photocopy of manuscript of Zola's 1865 play.

A.l.s. from Émile Zola to B.-H. Gausseron

  1. A.l.s. from Émile Zola to B.-H. Gausseron (1845-1913), [Paris], 17 August [1866], 1 p.
    Zola writes to Bernard-Henri Gausseron, who was, at the time, “aspirant-répétiteur” at the Lycée Napoléon [Condorcet] in Paris, requesting that he not use the letter of introduction which Zola had give him for Gustave Bourdin, one of the directors of the Figaro, since Bourdin was gravely ill at the time.
    Gausseron would go on to become a professor, a rare books dealer and a literary critic.
    To be published in Lettres retrouvées (eds. Owen Morgan and Dorothy E. Speirs), Montréal, Presses de l’Université de Montréal, 2010. The volume is set to appear in September 2010.
    The interest of this letter lies in its « destinataire » and, once again, in the fact that it dates from Zola’s early years.

A.l.s. from Émile Zola to André Lavertujon

  1. A.l.s. from Émile Zola to André Lavertujon (1827-1914), Paris, 19 May 1868, 1 p.
    Zola writes to André Lavertujon, at the time an important journalist and politician, and founder of La Tribune, a newspaper for which Zola wrote from June 1868 to January 1870, publishing 62 texts in all. In this letter, Zola says to Lavertujon that Théodore Duret, a mutual friend, has told Zola that Lavertujon had expressed the desire to read Zola’s new novel, Thérèse Raquin. Zola therefore sends Lavertujon a copy of the novel in the hopes that Lavertujon will find it interesting. Published in Correspondance, vol. II, p. 123-124 (letter 10).

A.l.s. from Émile Zola to Jules Claretie

  1. A.l.s. from Émile Zola to Jules Claretie (1840-1913), Paris, 7 October 1868, 1 p.
    An extremely interesting confidential letter, in which Zola, at the time a young writer for La Tribune, writes to Claretie who, he has learned, has just been hired by the same newspaper. Zola requests that Claretie, who was already writing for a number of newspapers, not submit articles of the same sort which Zola was writing (his “chroniques”), since Zola’s work at the Tribune represented for him, at the time, “the only sure work that I have at the moment”. Published in Correspondance, vol. II, p. 158-159 (letter 36).

A.l.s. from Zola to Édouard Bauer

  1. A.l.s. from Zola to Édouard Bauer, Paris, 8 February 1869, 1 p.
    Zola writes to Bauer, the founder and director of L’Événement illustré, in which Zola’s novel, La Famille Cayol (initial title of Les Mystères de Marseille) had been appearing since 23 October, 1868. Zola has learned that the newspaper is changing hands and Zola wants to know if the debt of 200 francs, which is owed to him by Bauer, will be assumed by the new owner, M. Damé. Published in Correspondance, vol. II, p. 195 (letter 68).

Files: 206-212

These files consist of letters sent to Zola between the years of 1858 to 1870, which represent Zola youth, his
relocation to Paris and the beginning of his writing career. Most of the letters contained in these files are typed
transcriptions (both on typewriter and computer printout). The typewriter copies are generally rough drafts of
the letters, where the Zola Research Program is editing the letters and attempting to establish dates and facts,
whereas the computer printouts represent the clean, final copy of the letter (the two copies are stapled
together). The early years in these files are dominated with letters by Paul Cézanne, Octave Lacroix, and
Aurélieu Houchard - most of which discuss everyday activities of the correspondents (some poems included),
as well as more professional correspondence once Zola begins work at Hachette Publishing in 1862. In 1864
and 1865, the letters express both support and criticism for the early published works by Zola, Contes à Ninon
and La Confession de Claude. Édouard Manet, Marius Roux and Antoine Guillemet become regular
correspondents from 1866 onwards (the letters by Roux and Manet are generally photocopies of handwritten
texts). The first letter from Alexandrine Zola, Émile Zola’s wife, appears on December 14, 1870 (in File

212), which is accompanied by various letters by Zola’s mother Émilie Zola. As well, a highlight of these files

is the letters from Zola’s editor, Lacroix and Verboeckhoven, discussing the publishing and printing to Zola’s
first major novel, Thérèse Raquin, in 1867.

Files: 20-32

These files consist of photocopies of handwritten letters and typed/handwritten transcriptions of letters
written by Émile Zola between January of 1856 and December of 1870. The letters contained within are both
personal and professional; Zola writes to his friends regarding his life in Paris and his burgeoning writing
career. Meanwhile, these files also contain letters from his job at Hachette Publishing as well as letters sent to
various editors and reviewers regarding his early works including Contes à Ninon, La Confession de Claude, and
Thérèse Raquin. Some recurring correspondents include Georges Charpentier, Philippe Solari, Paul Cézanne,
Edmond de Goncourt, Géry Legrand, Marius Roux and Antony Valabrègue.

A.l.s. from Émile Zola to Edmond Duranty

  1. A,l.s. from Émile Zola to Edmond Duranty (1833-1880), [Paris, 30 July 1875], 1 p.
    Zola thanks Duranty, a prominent journalist and novelist, for lending him a book, and apologizes for not returning it in person. He is pressed, however, since he and his wife are leaving for their holiday in the seaside town of Saint-Aubin.
    Published in Correspondance, vol. II, p. 402 (letter 224).

A.l.s. from Émile Zola to Numa Coste

  1. A.l.s. from Émile Zola to Numa Coste (1843-1904), Paris, 13 January 1876, 2 p.
    Note that the bottom half of the second page [no text here] is missing.
    Numa Coste, an old friend of Zola’s, was a journalist and art critic. He was one of a group of friends (including Coste, Paul Bourget, Paul Alexis, Anthony Valabrègue, and Émile Solari) with whom Zola met on a monthly basis, beginning in 1874, for a dinner which they had baptized the “dîner du ‘Boeuf nature’”. In this letter, Zola tells Coste that he has a bad cold and will not be able to come to the dinner. Zola suggests that Coste try to re-schedule the dinner or, if he cannot, that he not reserve a seat for him.
    Published in Correspondance, vol. II, p. 434 (letter 247).

Files: 30-44

These files consist of photocopies of handwritten letters and typed/handwritten transcriptions of letters
written by Émile Zola between January of 1871 and December of 1877. The letters contained within are both
personal and professional: Zola writes to childhood friends (Marius Roux, Paul Cézanne and Jean-Baptistin
Baille) regarding his career and life in Paris. Additionally, there are various letters sent to friends, editors and
reviewers regarding the first few novels in the Rougon-Macquart series including La Fortune des Rougon, La
Curée, Le Ventre de Paris and L’Assommoir. Recurring correspondents include Georges Charpentier, Philippe
Solari, Paul Cézanne, Edmond de Goncourt, Géry Legrand, Marius Roux and Antony Valabrègue.

A.l.s. from Émile Zola to Ernest Hamm

  1. A.l.s. from Émile Zola to Ernest Hamm (1852-?), Médan, 15 December 1878, 1 p.
    Zola writes to Ernest Hamm, a journalist with the Progrès de la Charente-Inférieure, to thank him for his article on Zola’s Théâtre, a collection of the texts of Zola’s plays Bouton de rose, Thérèse Raquin and Les Héritiers Rabourdin, which had appeared in September 1878. Zola apologizes to Hamm for not being able to send him copies of his novels, since he is not in Paris, but suggests that Hamm contact Zola’s editor (Georges Charpentier), who is in charge of distributing Zola’s novels to members of the press.
    Published in Correspondance, vol. X, p. 465 (letter S43).

Files: 45-54

These files consist of photocopies of handwritten letters as well as handwritten and typed transcriptions of
letters sent by Émile Zola to various correspondents between January of 1878 and December of 1879.
Recurring correspondents include Henry Céard, Léon Hennique, Gustave Flaubert, Ivan Tourgueniev,
Philippe Solari and Numa Coste. The contents of the letters are both personal and professional. Contained
with these files are discussions of Zola’s works including L’Attaque du Moulin, Une Page d’amour and early
discussions on Nana.

Files: 213-222

These files consist of photocopies of letters sent to Zola between January of 1871 and December of 1879.
These files are primarily composed of photocopies of handwritten letters, although there are a few typed
transcriptions of the letters as well. These files follow the increased popularity and success of Zola’s writing
with the release of L’Assommoir and the creation of a theatre production of Thérèse Raquin, which is likewise
reflected in the increase of fan mail in the later years. The contents of letters between Numa Coste, Louis
Marguery and Georges Charpentier (Zola’s editor) indicate that Zola is becoming increasingly involved in the
social world of literary authors (with names like Henry Céard, Léon Hennique, Guy de Maupassant, Joris-Karl
Huysmans and Louis Edmond Duranty appearing in the contents of the correspondence). Similarly, there is a
clear globalization of Zola’s works as Zola receives correspondence from the United States (discussing
translations) and Georges Charpentier discusses potential German translations.

A.l.s. from Émile Zola to Louis Boussès de Fourcaud

  1. A.l.s. from Émile Zola to Louis Boussès de Fourcaud (1851-1914), Paris, 18 April 1879, 1 p.
    A brief letter, in which Zola thanks Fourcaud for his article and for having “clearly indicated” Zola’s role in the definition of the naturalist ethic. Zola refers to an article published in Le Gaulois the same day.
    In his article, Fourcaud attacked Zola’s detractors and reiterated Zola’s explanation that he was not in fact the inventor of “naturalism”, but that, as he had stated a few weeks later in his “Lettre à la jeunesse”, he was simply an observer and a documenter of his times.
    Published in Correspondance, vol. III, p. 314 (letter 209).

Zola, Émile, L’assommoir

Zola, Émile, L’assommoir. Drame en cinq actes et neuf tableaux [adaptation de William Busnach et Octave Gastineau], avec une préface d’Émile Zola et un dessin de Georges Clairin, Paris, G. Charpentier, 1881. Original wrappers. Poor condition

A.l.s. from Émile Zola to an unknown correspondent

  1. A.l.s. from Émile Zola to an unknown correspondent, Médan, 1 December 1881, 1 p.
    Note : This letter is written on black-bordered paper. Zola’s mother had died on 17 October, 1880.
    Zola authorizes his correspondent to translate his play, Les Héritiers Rabourdin, and to perform it in Germany, as long as his correspondent shares with him the proceeds of the performances.
    Les Héritiers Rabourdin is a three-act comedy written by Zola in 1873-1874. It was performed at the Théâtre Cluny in Paris from the 3rd to the 20th of November 1874, but met with little success.
    Published in Correspondance, vol. IV, p. 241-242 (letter 175-A).

Files: 55-69

These files consist of photocopies of handwritten letters as well as handwritten and typed transcriptions of
letters sent by Émile Zola to various correspondents between January of 1880 and December of 1882.
Recurring correspondents include Henry Céard, Léon Hennique, Gustave Flaubert, Ivan Tourgueniev,
Philippe Solari and Numa Coste. Included in these files are discussions of Zola’s works Nana and Pot-Bouille.
As well, the letters discuss the death of both Gustave Flaubert (as seen in a letter to Céard, dated May 9, 1880,
in File #56) and Émilie Zola, Émile Zola’s mother (as seen in a letter to Zola’s uncle, Jules Aubert, dated
October 18, 1880, in File #58).

A.l.s. from Émile Zola to the Petit Versaillais

  1. A.l.s. from Émile Zola to the Petit Versaillais, Médan, 14 November 1882, 1 p.
    Zola writes to the newspaper to request that he be sent three copies of the November 5th issue of the paper.
    In this issue, there had appeared a report on the trial of Zola’s valet, Henri Cavillier, who had been arrested for hunting illegally in Vernouillet, near Zola’s country property in Médan. Cavillier was found guilty and fined 16 francs.
    Published in Correspondance, vol. IV, p. 340-341 (letter 265).

Files: 223-228

Files consist of photocopies handwritten letters, telegrams and cartes de visites written to Zola between the
years of January of 1880 and December of 1882. These letters are comprised of both personal correspondence
(letters from Zola’s godson, Paul Charpentier) and professional correspondence (people requesting
authorization to write various translations of Zola’s works). It is interesting to follow the progression of some
of Zola’s works throughout the time period in these letters (for example, Céard writing to Zola on January 13,
1880 about the editing on an upcoming compilation book titled Les Soirées à Médan between Zola, Henry
Céard, Léon Hennique, Joris-Karl Huysmans, Paul Alexis and Guy de Maupassant and then the incoming
letters from fans once the book is released in April of 1880). These files contain numerous fan mail letters
regarding various articles written in journals and books published during this period (including Pot-Bouille), as
well as requests from editors to write in their journals.

A.l.s. from Émile Zola to Damase Jouaust

  1. A.l.s. from Émile Zola to Damase Jouaust (1834-1893), Médan, 1 January 1883, 2 p.
    Zola tells Jouaust that he can come to Médan any day he likes, but requests that he come in the afternoon, since Zola needs his mornings to finish the novel he is currently working on (Au bonheur des dames). Jouaust was negotiating with Zola for the publication of a deluxe edition of one of Zola’s earlier novels, Une page d’amour, which appeared in December 1884 in a two-volume set with ten drawings by Edouard Dantan, engraved by A. Duvivier, and was preceded by a foreword by Zola.
    Published in Correspondance, vol. IV, p. 365 (letter 289).

A.l.s. (visiting card) from Émile Zola to Ernest Ziegler

  1. A.l.s. (visiting card) from Émile Zola to Ernest Ziegler (1847-1902), Paris, 26 [?], 1884, 1 p.
    A visiting card, bearing the message, “With many thanks”, written to Ernest Ziegler, a journalist, novelist, dramatist, and translator of Zola’s novels Germinal and L’Oeuvre.
    The card, which bears Zola’s Paris address, is accompanied by the stamped envelope, addressed to Ziegler in Vienna, and by a photograph of Zola. On the postmark, the day and the year are visible, but not the month.
    **Not published.

Files: 70-79

These files consist of photocopies of letters, postcards and cartes de visites and typed/handwritten
transcriptions of correspondence sent by Émile Zola between January of 1883 and December of 1884.
Recurring correspondents include Antoine Guillemet, Alphonse Daudet, Ernst Kiegler, Henry Céard,
Edmond de Goncourt, Georges Charpentier, Jacques van Santen Kolff and various family members (Amélie
Laborde, Lina Laborde, etc.). The contents of the box are both personal and professional in nature; there is
repeated discussion of lunches and dinners at the various houses of friends, as well as discussion of the
publication and translation of the following works: Pot-Bouille, Au Bonheur des Dames and La Joie de Vivre.

A.l.s. from Émile Zola to Adrien Remacle

  1. A.l.s. from Émile Zola to Adrien Remacle (1856-?), Médan, 12 May 1884, 1 p.
    Zola promises to send Remacle something for the next issue of La Revue indépendante.
    Zola’s short story, “Théâtre de campagne”, appeared in the second issue of La Revue indépendante (June 1884).
    Adrien Remacle worked as head of publicity for Zola’s publisher, Georges Charpentier, before becoming the director of La Revue contemporaine in 1885. He was also the author of several volumes of poetry and of a ballet based on Verlaine’s poetry.
    Published in Correspondance, vol. V, page 104 (letter 44).

A.l.s. from Émile Zola to Damase Jouaust

A.l.s. from Émile Zola to Damase Jouaust (1834-1893), Médan, 18 December 1884, 2 p.
Zola thanks Jouaust for his lovely edition of Une page d’amour (see letter 12 in this inventory) and compliments the artists on their fine work. Asks Jouaust not to send him any more copies of the work and asks him about the payment of 5,000 francs which is due him for having given Jouaust permission to reproduce the work. They will straighten this out when Zola gets back to Paris in January.
On the deluxe illustrated edition of Une page d’amour, see the notes to letter 12.
Published in Correspondance, vol. V, page 207 (letter 145).

Files: 80-89

These files consist of photocopies of letters, postcards and cartes de visites and typed/handwritten
transcriptions of correspondence sent by Émile Zola between January of 1885 and December of 1886.
Recurring correspondents include Antoine Guillemet, Alphonse Daudet, Ernst Kiegler, Henry Céard,
Edmond de Goncourt, Georges Charpentier, Jacques van Santen Kolff and various family members (Amélie
Laborde, Lina Laborde, etc.). The contents of the box are both personal and professional in nature as can be
seen through the various social gatherings mentioned in the letters, as well as professional discussion of the
publication and translation of the following works: La Joie de Vivre, Germinal, L'Œuvre and early talks about La
Terre.

A.l.s. from Émile Zola to André Maurel

Note: ITEMS number 16, 17a and 17b are in Maurel’s copy of Renée (stacks).

-16. A.l.s. from Émile Zola to André Maurel (1863-?), Paris, 20 March 1887, 1 p. Zola invites Maurel to visit him, in order that Maurel prepare an article on Zola’s upcoming play, Renée. Maurel was, at the time, a journalist for several major Paris dailies, as well as a prolific novelist and playwright. His article on Renée, which premiered at the Théâtre du Vaudeville in Paris on April 16 and ran until May 23, appeared in Le Voltaire on March 22, 1887 (under the pseudonym of “Lucien Valette”). **This letter is glued into a copy of the text of the play, which was published by Charpentier on May 30, 1887.
Published in Correspondance, vol. VI, page 106 (letter 46).
-17a. Autograph dedication from Zola to André Maurel (1863-?), [early April 1887], in a copy of Renée (see entry 16).
-17b. A.l.s. from Émile Zola to André Maurel (1863-?), [early April 1887], 1 p.

Al.s. from Émile Zola to Joseph-Antoine Floury

  1. Al.s. from Émile Zola to Joseph-Antoine Floury (1834-1894), Paris, 6 December 1887, 1 p. Zola sends Floury the finalized manuscript of the play, Germinal, which has been approved by the board of censors. He suggests that they now sit down and go through the play scene by scene, to discuss the sets and the blocking, since Zola has many ideas about these aspects of the play. Asks if Floury has received a copy of the illustrated edition of Germinal. An important letter. Joseph-Antoine Floury was the director of the Châtelet theatre in Paris. Zola’s play, which he wrote in collaboration with the popular dramatist, William Busnach, had been vetoed by the board of censors in 1885 and was not in fact performed until the authors had submitted a revised version of the manuscript, which is the version alluded to in the letter. The play opened at the Châtelet theatre on 21 April 1888. In spite of a number of spectacular stage effects, the play enjoyed only a moderate success, and closed after 17 performances.
    Note that J.B. Sanders published an edition of the play in 1989 (Québec, Le Préambule).
    Published in Correspondance, vol. VI, page 216-217 (letter 176).

A.l.s. from Émile Zola to Marius Roux

  1. A.l.s. from Émile Zola to Marius Roux (1838-1905), Médan, 23 juin 1887, 1 p. Zola apologizes for postponing the visit of the Roux family, since he did not know that Roux’s wife and daughter were leaving on holiday. He proposes that they re-schedule their visit for August and wishes them a pleasant holiday.
    Marius Roux was a long-time friend of Zola who had collaborated on Zola’s only (and ultimately unsuccessful) venture into newspaper publishing in 1870, when he and Roux founded the short-lived La Marseillaise. Marius Roux was a novelist himself, as well as a journalist, working for Le Rappel, L’Événement illustré and Le Petit Journal, among other papers.
    Published in Correspondance, vol. VI, page 153 (letter 103).

A.l.s. from Émile Zola to an unknown correspondent

  1. A.l.s. from Émile Zola to an unknown correspondent, Médan, 26 August 1887, 1 p. Zola regrets that he is bound by contract and cannot give his correspondent a volume of short stories.
    This may be in regard to a re-edition of some of Zola’s many short stories. Zola was bound by his contracts with Charpentier and with Flammarion (for the illustrated editions). It may also be in regard to the translation of his short stories. Here too, Zola had established contracts with a number of publishing houses throughout Europe, giving them the rights to the publication of his translations.
    Published in Correspondance, vol. VI, page 173-174 (letter 125).

Germinal (1887) loose manuscript sheets

17 loose sheets from the manuscript of the play, Germinal (1887), as follows:

-4 pages from the 7th scene, “La Collision”, scene X (note identifying the scene on the top of page 1, in J. Sanders’ hand)
-5 pages from the 10th scene, “L’Écroulement du Voreux” (note identifying the scene on the top of page 1, in J. Sanders’ hand)
-8 pages from “La Ducasse”, scene 2 (note identifying the scene on the top of page 1, in J. Sanders’ hand)

  • program of the «Centenary Dinner to celebrate the Visit of Emile Zola to London in September 1893», organized in September 1993 at the Savoy Hotel (London, England),

Files: 229-236

These files consist of photocopies of letters, cartes de visites telegrams and postcards written to Zola between
January of 1883 and January of 1887. Recurring correspondents include Georges Charpentier, Antoine
Guillemet, Numa Coste and the Manets. The early contents of the letters discuss Zola’s political and
philosophical battle concerning his naturalist literary style. There are multiple letters within these files that
indicate that Zola was considering multiple English journals when releasing the serial version of Germinal;
within these letters, we can see evidence of the concern on the part of the English for the moral and ethical
contents of Zola’s novels (see letter from Tilloston & Son, dated October 9, 1884, in File #232). Other works
mentioned in the letters include La Terre, L’Œuvre and L’Assommoir. File #235 contains the last letter between
Paul Cézanne and Zola in this collection (marking the end of their friendship) following the publication of
L’Œuvre, a work that was interpreted to be based upon the unsuccessful career of Cézanne (letter is dated
April 4, 1886).

Darzens, Rodolphe, L’Amante du Christ

Darzens, Rodolphe, L’Amante du Christ, scène évangélique, en vers. Représentée au Théâtre-Libre le 19 octobre 1888, préface de E. Ledrain. Frontispice gravé par Félicien Rops, Paris, Alphonse Lemerre, 1888. – With a dedicace: «À Mademoiselle Darsac. Hommage d’espoir en une création admirable, Rodolphe Darzens, 90». + a second copy marked «C», with signature of actress «Van Doren».

Files: 90-97

These files consist of photocopies of handwritten correspondence (letters, postcards, cartes de visites and
telegrams) as well as typed/handwritten transcriptions of letters sent by Émile Zola between January of 1887
and June of 1888. Recurring correspondents include Henry Céard, Léon Hennique, Jacques van Santen Kolff,
Numa Coste, Edmond de Goncourt, Gabriel Thyébaut and Alfred Bruneau. The letters pertain to both
personal and professional matters, or sometimes both, as seen in the case where Zola sent most of his close
friends (The Charpentiers, Céard, Hennique, Guillemot, de Goncourt, etc.) a letter indicating his displeasure
with the Théâtre du Châtelet because they were playing an unauthorized version of Germinal. Zola refused to
attend himself and encouraged his friends to also boycott the show (letters dated April 21, 1888, in File #97).
Other works discussed in these files include La Terre and Le Rêve.

Gramont, Louis de, Rolande

Gramont, Louis de, Rolande. Pièce en quatre actes (cinq tableaux), Paris, Tresse & Stock Éditeurs, 1888. – With annotations throughout. Copy marked «Souffleur». With printed dedicace: «A Antoine, directeur du Théâtre-Libre et aux interprètes de Rolande. Reconnaissance profonde, Gramont.»

A.l.s. with envelope from Émile Zola to Ély Halpérine-Kaminsky

  1. A.l.s. with envelope from Émile Zola to Ély Halpérine-Kaminsky (1858-1936), Médan, 9 January 1888, 2 p. An important letter about Halpérine-Kaminsky’s translation into French of Tolstoï’s play, entitled in French La Puissance des ténèbres. Zola refutes remarks made by Halpérine-Kaminsky in an article recently published in La Nouvelle Revue, according to which Zola had found certain elements of the translated play badly done. Zola assures his correspondent that he simply felt that the translation of the play did not lend itself overly well to being staged.
    Ély Halpérine-Kaminsky was a journalist and translator, having translated works by Tolstoï, Dostoïevski and Tourguéniev into French and Zola’s La Débâcle (1892) into Russian. The envelope is stamped and franked, and reads : “Monsieur E. Halpérine, 85 boulevard de Port-Royal, Paris”. Note that the next letter (no 22) continues this conversation.
    Published in Correspondance, vol. VI, page 238-239 (letter 197).

A.l.s. with envelope from Émile Zola to Ély Halpérine-Kaminsky

  1. A.l.s. with envelope from Émile Zola to Ély Halpérine-Kaminsky (1858-1936), Médan, 18 January 1888, 2 p. This letter continues the conversation begun in letter 21. Zola gives Halpérine-Kaminsky his permission to publish his letter of 9 January 1888 (no 21), on the condition that he publishes the letter in its entirety. Zola goes on to comment on the question of plays written to be read versus plays written to be performed, and concludes that this is a fiction put forth by the critics : for Zola, there are plays which excite the public and plays which do not. He cites as an example the dramas of Alfred de Musset, which were written to be read, but which were still being performed in Zola’s day. On the other hand, Zola continues, many contemporary plays which were meant to be performed rather than read have already fallen into oblivion. He concludes that one must not generalize about the “theatre public”, since there are many different types of audiences. Halpérine-Kaminsky (see notes to letter 22) published Zola’s letter in an article which appeared in La Nouvelle Revue on 1 February 1888. The play itself was first performed at André Antoine’s Théâtre Libre in 10 February 1888 with great success. The envelope is stamped and franked, and reads : “Monsieur E. Halpérine, 85 boulevard de Port-Royal, Paris”.
    Published in Correspondance, vol. VI, page 242-243 (letter 202).

Corneau, André, Belle-Petite

Corneau, André, Belle-Petite, comédie en un acte, Paris, Tresse & Stock, 1888. – With a dedicace: «A André Antoine, le plus aimable des directeurs. Témoignage de vive gratitude et de cordiale sympathie, André Corneau.»

Files: 237-243

These files consist of photocopies of handwritten letters, cartes de visites, postcards, and some transcriptions
of letters sent to Zola between February of 1887 and July of 1888. There is a clear increase in both the number
of letters sent to Zola in these files, as well as his popularity (particularly in 1887). The files within are divided
into 2-3 month section. The early files are comprised of mostly short notes and cartes de visites, with quite a
few on letterheads from the journal Le Figaro and from the Théâtre de Paris. The later files contain mostly
lengthier letters from friends (recurring correspondents include Marius Roux, Jacques van Santen Kolff, Numa
Coste, Henry Céard and Georges Charpentier) as well as supporters and critics. The increase in the amount of
letters sent to Zola in 1887 could perhaps be attributed both to his increase in popularity (some of his most
ground-breaking books had recently been published), as well as a very critical article published in Le Figaro which targeted both Zola and his most recent novel La Terre. Additionally these files include personal
correspondence and professional papers that discuss the publication of the novel Le Rêve in the journal La
Revue Illustrée.

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