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Luckyj 1995 accession

Correspondence, notes, reports, manuscripts, press clippings, interviews, and photoprints documenting the career of George S. N. Luckyj as a professor in and chair of the Department of Slavic Studies at the University of Toronto. Included is a comprehensive account of the controversy over the establishment of the Chair of Ukrainian Studies at the University of Toronto (1979-1980). Also present are Professor Luckyj's diaries, his memoirs (1987), and the memoirs of his paternal grandfather (1942) and his mother (1970).

Other professional activities

Dr. Hastings’ professional activities are largely related to his interests in community medicine and often have close links to his work at the University of Toronto. The files are arranged alphabetically by the name of the organization or event with which they are most closely associated.

The series begins with a file on his participation in a round table discussion on “surveillance and the role of public health” for the Commission of Inquiry on the Blood System in Canada [Krever Commission] in 1995. This is followed by background material for and memoranda, statements and briefs, with which Dr. Hastings was involved, that were submitted to the Royal Commission on Health Services between 1961 and 1963, along with subsequent press coverage. He and Dr. William Mosley of the School of Hygiene submitted a massive report, “Organized community health services” in 1963, following a brief, drafts of which are preserved here, presented by the School’s director, Dr. Andrew Rhodes, the previous year.

Hastings was also a member of committees of the Canadian Public Health Association and the United Church of Canada that submitted briefs in 1962.

Other files document Dr. Hastings’ activities with Canadian College of Health Service Executives, for which he chaired the Extendicare Award Selection Committee for 1984-1986; in the mid-1980s, the Canadian Council on Social Development, for which he helped develop strategies for community health services, and the Canadian Hospital Association, for which he participated in a study on the future of hospitals in Canada.

Dr. Hastings was made an honorary life member of the Canadian Public Health Association for his many contributions. The files (boxes 036-038) document his activities as a president (1996-1997), as a member of its board of directors and several committees, including public health practices, archives, higher education and, especially, international health secretariat and review (1988-1992) and a planning committee for a national workshop on public health education (1991). There is a substantial file on the drafting of a national health plan for the Palestinian people (1993). Other files include the restructuring of Ontario health services (1997), the Canadian Institutes for Health Research, and the Association’s annual conferences for 1980 and from 1991 to 2000. There are also a number of briefs and reports.

The files on the Canadian Welfare Council document the activities of its special committee on health services’ submissions to the Royal Commission on Health Services. These are followed by files on health issues faced by the City of Toronto in 1992 and 2002; Dr. Hastings had been a member of the liaison committees of the University of Toronto with the teaching health units for East York, North York and the City of Toronto.

In 1971 Dr. Hastings went on full-time leave for a year from the University of Toronto to direct a major study of a community health centre project for the Conference of Health Ministers of Canada. His files (boxes 039-041) include correspondence, memoranda, notes, budgets, position papers, minutes of meetings, interim and progress reports, and working seminars, along with drafts of the final report and reactions to it. The report, instantly dubbed “The Hastings Report”, was widely praised and cemented Dr. Hastings’ reputation as a leading authority in his field.

Other activities documented in this series include two conferences on epidemiology, one in Cali, Columbia during his tour of public health services in South America in 1959 and the other a joint National Cancer Institute of Canada/U of T meeting in 1988. There are files for conferences on comparative health services at Ditchley, England (1972) and Dublin (1980), and for consulting on health administration for the Informatie en Communicatie Unie in the Netherlands (1981) and the Oakville-Trafalgar Memorial Hospital (1992). There is also a copy of an undated (ca. 1976) and unpublished report on an overview of the Canadian health system.

Dr. Hastings’ association with the Pan American Health Organization dates from the 1960s. Late in 1964 he was a participant in a special program on health planning sponsored by the World Health Organization, the PAHO and the United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America, for which he visited Chile, Uruguay and Argentina, already referred to in Series 3. The files here date largely from 1974, when he critiqued a long-term planning report for the WHO, and his consultancy two years later for that organization on health services in Brazil and Chile. This and other work lead to him receiving the PAHO Administration Award for 1987. The majority of the PAHO files relate to the Canadian-Caribbean Health Initiative (boxes 042-044), a joint PAHO/University of Toronto/CPHA project for which, from its inception in 1988, Dr. Hastings served as chair of the steering committee. There are also files relating to the Caribbean Public Health Association and the Caribbean Regional Epidemiology Centre.

Dr. Hastings acted as a consultant and expert on many issues relating to community health, including two in Quebec -- programs in community health (1980) and the Quebec Commission de l’Enquéte sur les Services Santé (1987), and pediatric issues for the Thames Valley District Health Council (1988). One of his early research projects (1966-1970) was a joint Canada-WHO study of the delivery of health services in Sault Ste. Marie, due to the then unique program in Canada of Algoma Steel Corporation offering its employees a choice of health benefits through the local district health association or a private carrier. The findings were published in 1973, a follow-up study was carried out by the Ontario Ministry of Health in 1975, and a history of the Sault Ste. Marie and District Group Health Association followed in 1981.

In 1992 Dr. Hastings was invited to address a seminar on heath care systems organized by the Mexican Foundation for Health and the National Academy of Medicine, to be held the
following March in Mexico City. He kept extensive files on the proceedings. In 1994 he was invited to be a consultant to the World Bank’s health project for the newly independent republic of Georgia. He visited the country on three occasions over the next two years and kept detailed files on his activities, including correspondence, notes, reports, and photographs.

The series ends with several activities related to Dr. Hastings’ travels in the 1950s and the early 1960s to Asia, and to his involvement with the World Health Organization both at the beginning and the end of his career. In 1953, on the way back to Canada from the his World University Service trip to India (see Series 3 and below), he stopped off in Britain to attend the first World Conference on Medical Education in London, to take in the Queen’s coronation, and to visit Scotland, especially Edinburgh and Iona. He kept a file on this conference and on the third world conference in New Delhi in 1966, after which he toured northern India, making a side trip to Madras and Ludhiana, and then going on to Hong Kong and Japan.

In 1960 a World Health Organization travel fellowship enabled Dr. Hastings to study medical care, public health and the teaching of social medicine in the United Kingdom, Scandinavia, the USSR, India, Ceylon, Singapore, and Japan. Again, he kept detailed records of his travels, including notes and accounts of his impressions, especially on the Soviet Union. Afterwards, he wrote a detailed report on what he saw. Later WHO –related activities include an employment offer as chief of WHO’s Organization of Medical Care Unit in Geneva (1969), which Dr. Hastings reluctantly turned down; and his work as member of WHO’s Expert Advisory Panel on Public Health Administration between 1974 and 1990.

In the summer of 1953, as the University of Toronto’s representative at the World University Service International Mysore Seminar, Dr. Hastings had an opportunity to gain first hand insights into and an understanding of the many problems facing developing countries. He visited India, Ceylon and Pakistan, and carefully preserved his correspondence, notes, reports and photographs. Two years later, he was the University’s faculty member on the WUS International Japan Seminar, and spent a further month studying medical education and medical care in Japan through an arrangement with the World Health Organization. His correspondence, diaries, minutes of meetings, and notes served him well; he was much in demand on the lecture circuit afterwards, especially after his report on medical education in Japan and other articles reflecting on his experiences appeared in 1956 and 1957. The series ends with a 1962 report on the WUS student tuberculosis sanatorium in Japan and a file on the WUS Chile Seminar in 1964.

Menus from the United States - California (1930s to 2000s)

Contains 21 menus:
Canton Low
Chef Chu's
Chef Chu's
Chef Jia's
China Camp
Ching How Menu
Fong Fong Tea Pavilion
Fong Wan's Club Shanghai
Fong Wan's Club Shanghai
Fong Wan's Club Shanghai
Forbidden City
Frank Fat's
Gang Sue's Tea Garden
Golden Dragon Restaurant
Golden Pavilion, The
House of Lee
Indo China
Kan's
Kan's
Kan's
Lions Den

Menus from the United States - New York (1930s to 2000s)

Contains 25 menus:
Au Mandarin Restaurant
Barbizon-Plaza
Chin's Red Dragon
China Doll
Chinese Village Restaurant
Cotton Club
Homers Oriental
Homers Oriental
Larchmont Yacht Club
Lee Chu's Restaurant
Lichee Tree
Lou Walters' Latin Quarter
Mandarin House in the Village
Massapequa Restaurant & Grill
Ming Tree Restaurant
Ming Dynasty
Mo Pitkin's Restaurant
Peking Duck House
Richard Mei's King Dragon
Russian Tea Room, The
Shanghai Royal
Shanghai Royal
Soo Lin
Sun Luck
Tao

Martin Lawrence Friedland fonds

  • UTA 1294
  • collection
  • 1868-2020

Fonds consists of six accessions of records documenting the life of Martin L. Friedland, as a student, professor of law and administrator at the University of Toronto; as an expert on legal matters and a contributor to the formation of public policy at the provincial and federal levels; and as an author of several books and numerous articles, in particular the researching and writing of his book University of Toronto: A History (University of Toronto Press, 2002 & 2013).

See accession-level descriptions for further details.

Friedland, Martin Lawrence

‘The Laskin legacy: a commemoration of the life and contributions of the Right Honourable Bora Laskin, P.C., Q.C.’ DVD – See chapters 16-22 on Disc 1 for Friedland’s talk

Talks are given by Roy McMurtry, Michel Robert and Ian Bini, Peter Hogg among many. Friedland delivers a talk - ‘Bora Laskin and the University.’ See chapters 16-22 on Disc 1 for Friedland’s talk.

13th Colloquium on the Legal Profession - Lawyers, Legends, Legacies and Lessons from Ontario Legal History - Day 2

These are recordings of day two of the Colloquium that took place at University of Toronto. The first session on disc 1 includes a session on the Archaelogy of Legal Proceedings: In Search of Professionalism. Session is introduced by Martin Friedland and includes talks by Lawyer Patricia McMahon and Judge Robert Sharpe who disucss the "Persons Case". In also includes Jim Phillips of the University of Toronto Law School discussing the history of the Manitoba Fisheries Case. Session is commented by Bruce Elman, Dean of the University of Windsor, Faculty of Law. Disc 2 contains the Goodman Lecture by Chief Justice Roy McMurtry. An interview wiht McMurtry about the importance of the history of law is imbedded in the proceddings.

Our Day in Court: Charter and the Courts

This is a radio program produced by CJRT for Open College. This program (#8) discussed the Criminal Justice system and the new 1982 Constitution. It features historian Kenneth McNaughton, Ramsay Cook and John Saywell, who give historical context to how the constitution has changed the relationship with Judges and politicians. This is followed by legal scholars Martin Friedland, Michael Mandle and Alan Yen? who discuss the impact of the constitution on criminal justice procedures. It aslo features Pierre Trudeau discussing these topics as well as Alan Greenspan.

13th Colloquium on the Legal Profession - Lawyers, Legends, Legacies and Lessons from Ontario Legal History - Day 1

Recordings of sessions on day one of the Colloquium that took place at Osgood Hall. Disk 1 includes talks given on the following historical figures: Cecil (Caesar Wright), Norman Lisker, G. Arthur Martin, William Perkin Bull, Bora Laskin, Vera Parsons, E. Lionell Cross, Bertha Wilson, Willima Renwich Riddell and Clara Brett Martin, Joseph Valin, J. L. Cohen. Disk 2 has historicap papers on Women's Law Association of Ontario, Lord Reading Law Club and Lawyers and Military Service.

Sound and Moving Images

Series consists primarily of recordings of various interviews and addresses given by Martin Friedland regarding the legal system in addition to his book The University of Toronto: A History.

Addresses

Professor Friedland was asked by the Centre of Criminology and the Faculty of Law to give the John Edwards Memorial Lecture for 2003. This provided an opportunity to write an early draft of his memoirs, My Life in Crime and Other Academic Adventures, which he had been thinking about writing since finishing the University of Toronto history project. Over the summer he did a very long version of the lecture (the final count was over 37,000 words, with earlier drafts of around 25,000 words.) Then, for the lecture itself, he made a shorter version of about 15,000 words, followed by a much shorter version that could be delivered in 40 minutes or so. The article that appeared in the Criminal Law Quarterly was a somewhat revised version of the 15,000 word paper and was not the lecture as delivered. These files contain correspondence, notes, and drafts of the lecture, which was somewhat altered for Professor Friedland’s 2004 Life Learning lecture. The versions adapted for the Criminal Law Quarterly article appear in Series 5.

Some post-2003 addresses in B2014-0029 and B2020-0008 appear in Series 5 and 7, where they were placed by Professor Friedland.

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