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University of St. Michael's College, John M. Kelly Library, Special Collections Item
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Zeige mir den weg: texte fur alle tage von aschermittwoch bis ostern

Item consists of a book written by Nouwen containing excerpts from his previously published writings. The translated title is: Show Me the Way : Readings for Each Day of Lent. The 40-day Lenten path includes readings for Ash Wednesday, the four weeks of Lent, Passion Week, Holy Week, Good Friday, and Easter Sunday.

You can go home again

This item is a two page article by Henri Nouwen entitled ‘You can go home again’, published in Salt: for Christians who seek social justice’ by the Claretians, Vol. 12, No. 4, April 1992, pp. 29 – 30. This article is identified as excerpts from Nouwen’s forthcoming book The Return of the Prodigal Son. Nouwen begins the article by describing his first encounter with Rembrandt’s painting and his powerful response to it coming as it was at a vulnerable time for Nouwen. Nouwen then goes on to write of the biblical story from which the painting and Nouwen’s writing is coming. Nouwen relates the story of the younger son and Nouwen’s own sense of finding himself in the story. ‘Over and over again I have left home. I have fled the hands of blessing and run off to faraway places searching for love! This is the great tragedy of my life and of the lives of so many I meet on my journey’. Nouwen concludes, ‘ Here the mystery of my life is unveiled. I am loved so much that I am left free to leave home. But the Father is always looking for me with outstretched arms to receive me back…’

Woven dove

Item consists of one framed woven piece depicting a dove. The bird is white, with navy blue tipped wings, and is on a light blue background. The back of the frame has handwritten quotes from: Luke 12:24, Isaiah 40:31, Tagore, and Victor Hugo, as well as a note from Tracy Fein, dated January 26, 1984, explaining her thoughts about the bird.

Working for peace: saying 'yes' to life and 'no' to death

This item is a 2 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled, ‘Working for Peace’ published in The Lutheran, Vol. 24, No. 5, March 5, 1986, pp. 10- 11. This item is identified as Part III of a 3 part series and taken from the New Oxford Review. Nouwen begins by saying, ‘As peacemakers we must have the courage to see the powers of death at work even in our innermost selves…’. Nouwen writes of his own struggle to accept himself as loved and forgiven by God and the difficulty that creates for him to grow as a peacemaker. Nouwen describes the forces of self-rejection as forces of death. He then states that ‘a loving heart that continues to affirm life at all times and places can say ‘no’ to death without being corrupted by it. Nouwen then goes on to write of the importance of resisting the forces of death in our society in whatever way seems right. Nouwen concludes ‘ Prayer and resistance, the two pillars of Christian peacemaking, are two interlocking ways of giving expression to the peace we have found in the dwelling place of God’.

Working for peace: saying "no" to death requires saying "yes" to life

This item is a 3 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled ‘Working for Peace’ published in The Church Herald of the Reformed Church in America, Vol. XLIII, No. 18, October 18, 1986, pp. 11 – 13. This is identified as the second of two articles on Peacemaking. Nouwen opens the article by stating, ‘ As peacemakers we must have the courage to see the powers of death at work even in our innermost selves…’Nouwen speaks of that within us which does not accept ourselves and that this is ‘one of the greatest enemies of the peacemaker’. Nouwen speaks of the central message of the Gospel which is that we are forgiven and this truth can help us overcome our fear of ourselves and of others. Nouwen writes of the need to resist, resist the forces of death and to affirm life. He speaks of the need for joy even in the face of pain. Nouwen concludes by saying, ‘Prayer cannot be fruitful unless it brings us into a new and creative relationship with people. Resistance cannot be fruitful unless it deepens and strengthens our relationship with God. Prayer and Resistance, the two pillars of Christian peacemaking…’This item is a 3 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled ‘Working for Peace’ published in The Church Herald of the Reformed Church in America, Vol. XLIII, No. 18, October 18, 1986, pp. 11 – 13. This is identified as the second of two articles on Peacemaking. Nouwen opens the article by stating, ‘ As peacemakers we must have the courage to see the powers of death at work even in our innermost selves…’Nouwen speaks of that within us which does not accept ourselves and that this is ‘one of the greatest enemies of the peacemaker’. Nouwen speaks of the central message of the Gospel which is that we are forgiven and this truth can help us overcome our fear of ourselves and of others. Nouwen writes of the need to resist, resist the forces of death and to affirm life. He speaks of the need for joy even in the face of pain. Nouwen concludes by saying, ‘Prayer cannot be fruitful unless it brings us into a new and creative relationship with people. Resistance cannot be fruitful unless it deepens and strengthens our relationship with God. Prayer and Resistance, the two pillars of Christian peacemaking…’

Wooden tabernacle

Item consists of one wooden tabernacle. The item has two doors in the front, which lock [key included]. The tabernacle would have been used to store the Eucharist.

Wooden sculpture

Item consists of one wooden sculpture, all carved from one block of dark wood. The bottom of the wood features the carved inscription 'The Remnant' and possibly a signature of the artist. The sculpture features a seated figure with its legs pulled to its chest, and one arm wrapped around the body. The other arm is resting on the floor, with its palm facing upward and cupped. The figure is sanded smooth with a finish, while the base is left rough.

Wooden rosary

Item consists of one set of rosary beads. These beads are wooden, brown, and include a wooden cross with a carving of Jesus.

Wooden nativity set

Item consists of one nativity set. There are fourteen pieces depicting the Wise Men, Jesus, Mary, Joseph, and some animals. These pieces are made of wood and are painted.

Wooden crucifix

Item consists of one large wooden crucifix. The figure of Jesus is intricately carved. According to an email from Sue Mosteller and Joe Child, in which Joe tells what he remembers of the figure: "The story I remember is that there was an old priest at Freiburg University who was an old friend of Henry's. Either before or after he died, he gave Henry the cross, and it came from a church in WWII, and the cross was all he recovered from the bombed out building. Henry brought it back and showed it to me and asked if I would mount it on a cross. I made a cross, and then gave it a high gloss finish. This accentuated the figure, which was a carved figure of Christ, and there was no finish on it, so it contrasted well with the finish on the cross. Henry liked it, and was around the old chapel for a long time. That is about all I can remember."

Wooden card holder

Item consists of one wooden card holder. It is a block with space to hold several business cards. Likely kept on a desktop.

Wooden acrobat toy

Item consists of one painted wooden acrobat toy on a wooden stand given to Nouwen by Joseph and Brad for Christmas. There is a handwritten note from Joseph and Brad on the wooden stand.

With the season's greetings

Item consists of 1 novelty picture postcard with a divided back of a bridge by the water. The postcard has a white substance applique to alter the scene to appear snowy. The postcard has 1 Edward VII half penny green stamp.

With the season's greetings

Item consists of 1 novelty picture postcard with a divided back of houses and a windmill. The postcard has a white substance applique to alter the scene to appear snowy. The postcard has 1 Edward VII half penny green stamp.

With care

Item consists of a typescript for "With Care: Mark 6:30-44", a talk on care of the sick and pastoral counseling. Nouwen argues that cure without care is more harmful than helpful, even in the professional setting. He asks: What does it mean to care? How to become a caring community around the person who is suffering? Nouwen urges his listeners to go beyond the professional to the human in the "caring" professions. Similar ideas were published in "Out of Solitude".

With burning hearts: a meditation on the eucharistic life

Item consists of a book written by Nouwen in Chobham, England and Sacramento, California and is about the Eucharist and the Eucharistic life. The book has been divided into the following: Acknowledgments; Introduction; The Road to Emmaus; I. Mourning Our Losses "Lord, Have Mercy"; II. Discerning the Presence "This Is the Word of God"; III. Inviting the Stranger "I Believe"; IV. Entering into Communion "Take and Eat"; V. Going on a Mission "Go and Tell"; Conclusion.
As is stated on the front flap: ". . . . With Burning Hearts seeks a fuller understanding of Eucharist through the story of the disciples on their way to Emmaus from Jerusalem after the crucifixion (Luke 24: 13-35)."

With best New Year wishes

Item consists of 1 embossed picture postcard with a divided back with New Years greetings and birds lookings at a winter scene. The postcard has 1 series 1902 Franklin one cent stamp.

With best Christmas wishes

Item consists of 1 picture postcard with a divided back from the Raphael Tuck & Sons "Oilette" series, no. 6492, of a bird and two figures in front of a windmill. The postcard has 1 Edward VII one cent Canada postage stamp.

Wishes sincere

Item consists of 1 embossed picture postcard with a divided back of a horseshoe in front of holly. The postcard has 1 Edward VII one cent Canada postage stamp.

Wisdom of emptiness

This item is a half-page article by Henri Nouwen entitled, ‘Wisdom in Emptiness’ published in the National Catholic Reporter, October 4, 1974, p. 11. Nouwen begins the article by stating that most people need constant occupation and without it are restless and feel useless. He says ‘Being busy, active and on the move has nearly become part of our constitution’. Nouwen goes on to state ‘this is why silence is such a difficult task’. He suggests that occupation and preoccupation are our ’fearful ways to keep things the same’…’we hold on to the familiar life items which we have collected in the past’. Nouwen uses as an example of this a story by Carlos Castaneda and the story of Jesus’ exhortation that we should ‘not worry …your heavenly father knows what you need’. Nouwen concludes by saying, ‘ Conversion is an inner event that cannot be planned or organized, but needs to develop from within. Just as you cannot force a plant to grow, but can take away the weeds and stones which prevent its development, so you can… offer the space where such a conversion can take place’.

Windsor Beach. N.Y.

Item consists of 1 picture postcard with an undivided back of Windsor Beach in New York. The postcard has 1 series of 1902 Franklin one cent stamp.

Why do you invite people for dinner?

Item consists of a manuscript of "Why do you invite people to dinner?", a sermon given by Nouwen to priests and seminarians at Moreau Seminary, University of Notre Dame, before the summer break. He writes about hospitality: that inviting someone to dinner is also an invitation to intimacy, and that so is the Eucharist.

Why I came to L'Arche

This item is a half-page article by Henri Nouwen entitled ‘Why I came to L’Arche’, published in Scarboro Missions, by The Scarboro Foreign Missions Society, April 1987, Vol. 68, No. 4, p. 22. Nouwen briefly discusses his journey to the L’Arche community of Daybreak at Richmond Hill, On. He describes his time at Yale and Harvard and his sense that ‘I wasn’t living fully what I was speaking about’. Nouwen speaks of his contact with Jean Vanier and his eventual decision to try to live the community life of L’Arche.

Why Are You Going to the Trappists?: An Interview with Henri Nouwen

Item consists of an interview of Henri Nouwen by Parker Rossman. Rossman asks Nouwen questions about his choice to go to a Trappist monastery while on his sabbatical from Yale Divinity School. The interview is titled "Why Are You Going to the Trappists? An Interview with Henri Nouwen."

What men really want

Item consists of a copy of a magazine article called "What men really want" by Keith Thompson. The article is an interview with Robert Bly.

Weest stil, en weet...: De betekenis van het werk van Henri J.M. Nouwen voor de praktijk van het protestantse pastoraat

Item consists of a bound copy of a doctoral thesis by Annet van Lindenberg at the Theologische Universiteit van de Gereformeerde Kerken in Nederland from June 1988. The thesis is titled "Weest stil, en weet... De betekenis van het werk van Henri J.M. Nouwen voor de praktijk van het protestantse pastoraat" [Be still and know ... The significance of the work of Henri J.M. Nouwen on the practice of the Protestant chaplaincy].

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