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Associations

This series reflects Professor Bay’s involvement in the American Political Science Association and its radical Caucus for a New Political Science which was formed by 200 dissident political scientists, of which Professor Bay was one, at the September, 1967 meeting of the APSA. Bay was president from 1971 to 1972. Material included is minutes of meetings, correspondence, newsletters, memos, and election material. Some material related to addresses presented at panels and conferences can be found in this series. Related material may also be located in the correspondence series.

Associations and committees

An active joiner and participant, Dr. Solandt belonged to many associations and sat on many committees. Those documented here are those he was most interested in and his involvement often lasted many years. The title for this series is Dr. Solandt

Atomic bomb

In September, 1945 the British Chiefs of Staff were invited by their American counterparts to send a mission to Japan to study the effects of the atomic bomb. Omond Solandt was loaned to the Scientific Advisor to the Army Council in the War Office to go as his representative. He went as a specialist in damage to military installations but, there being none of significance in Hiroshima or Nagasaki, spent most of his time studying the casualties from a medical perspective.

This series includes Dr. Solandt

Barry Glenn Levine fonds

  • UTA 1477
  • Fonds
  • 1977-1989

Fonds consists of 2 accessions

B1985-0028: Research notes and files assembled for and drafts of portions of Barry Levine's book, A Century of Skill and Vigour, a history of the Toronto Engineering Society. (1 box, 1984-1985)

B2000-0014: Photographs document the activities of the University of Toronto Engineering Society which were used in publications such as the Skule Calendar, 1980-81 and 1982-83, as well as original photographs and layouts used in the book authored by Levine "A Century of Skill and Vigour". One copy of a special Toike publication called Rodent Track, a parady of the car magazine Road and Track, is also included. (2 boxes and 1 item, 1977-1989)

Levine, Barry Glenn

Bearing fruit in the Spirit: the gifts of God's love

This item is a 5 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled: Bearing Fruit in the Spirit, The House of God a Home amid an Anxious World, published in Sojourners, July 1985, Vol. 14, No. 7, pp. 26 – 30. This is part two of a three part series. Nouwen begins the article by speaking of the life-giving quality of fecundity in a world that seldom appears to experience that. Nouwen follows this with a section entitled, Fecundity and Fear. Here Nouwen identifies sterility and productivity as possible manifestations of a fearful approach to life-giving forces and fecundity. ‘In our contemporary society, with its emphasis on accomplishment and success, we often live as if being productive is the same as being fruitful’. In this section Nouwen writes of his experience with Jean Vanier and the people of L’Arche who showed him the life-giving gift of people who appear to ‘accomplish’ little. In the next section Nouwen writes of Fecundity and Love. He identifies three aspects of the fruitful life as ‘vulnerability, gratitude and love’ and discusses each in detail. Nouwen concludes the article with the section entitled: Fecundity and Mission. Here he begins by stating, ‘When we come to experience intimacy with God as including all of humanity, it will become clear that fecundity also has a global quality’. Nouwen goes on to say, ‘One of the most compelling aspects of the Spirit of Jesus is that it always sends us forth to bring and receive the gifts of God to and from all peoples and nations’. Nouwen suggests that our world would be very different if we recognized that there is something for us to receive from others, not just to give to them. He concludes the article by saying ‘ If giving and receiving the fruits of the intimate love of God for all people were our main concern, peace would be near’.

Because of Adam

This item is a 3 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled, ‘Because of Adam’, published in The Reader’s Digest, January 1990, pp. 114 – 116. This item is condensed from an article published in Weavings, March/April 1988. Nouwen begins by stating that he has recently moved from academia to living at the l’Arche community of Daybreak with men and women who have mental disabilities. He describes being assigned to help a very severely handicapped man named Adam Arnett. Nouwen describes his daily routine with the totally helpless 25 year old man and his growing awareness that Adam was doing more for him than he for Adam. ‘This severely handicapped young man, whom outsiders sometimes describe with very hurtful words, started to become my dearest companion’. Nouwen goes on to describe the very special effect Adam has on the people with whom he lives and the peace that, because of Adam’s need, helps them to work together.

Behold the beauty of the Lord: praying with icons

Item consists of a book which Nouwen wrote about four Russian icons, which first came to his attention when he visited L'Arche in Trosly, France in the fall of 1983. The book has been divided into the following: Introduction; I. The Icon of the Holy Trinity: Living in the House of Love, Introduction, A Gentle Invitation, Where Heart Speaks to Heart, The Circle, The Cross and Liberation, Conclusion; II. The Icon of the Virgin of Vladimir: Belonging to God, Introduction, The Eyes of the Virgin, The Hands of the Virgin, The Child of the Virgin, Conclusion; III. The Icon of the Savior of Zvenigorod: Seeing Christ, Introduction, Seeing a Damaged Image, Seeing a Tender Human Face, Seeing Eyes Which Penetrate both the Heart of God and Every Human Heart, Conclusion; IV. The Icon of the Descent of the Holy Spirit: Liberating the World, Introduction, The God-within, The Community of Faith, The Liberation of the World, Conclusion; Conclusion; References.
As is stated in the introduction: "Like the painting by Chagall, [which his parents bought when they were first married and to which Nouwen has connected his mother's beauty, the icons] . . . have imprinted themselves so deeply upon my inner life that they appear every time I need comfort and consolation."

Beyond the mirror: reflections on death and life

Item consists of a book written by Nouwen about an accident he had when he was hit by the side view mirror of a passing van. The book has been divided into the following: Acknowledgments; Prologue; The Accident; The Hospital; The Surgery; Recovery; Epilogue.

Biographical and personal files

This series is divided into two sections. The first contains biographical sketches and curriculum vitae, press clippings and articles about Dr. Solandt, along with photocopies of his birth certificate and copies of his will and that of his first wife, Elizabeth. There is correspondence with Elizabeth regarding their marriage, with relatives and friends, and relating to appointments. Also present is a cash book detailing personal expenses between 1923 and 1946, a diary of Dr. Solandt’s first trip to Europe in 1929.

The first portion of this series concludes with the programme for the Solandt Symposium on Organizing and Managing the Practical Application of Science to Problems in Peace and War (Queen’s University at Kingston, 1994), programs for dinners of the Royal Canadian Engineers 3rd Field Engineer Regiment and the Royal Canadian Signals 11th Signal Regiment, a presentation copy of Donald Y. Solandt’s Highways to Health, and a resolution by Donald M. Solandt (Omond and Donald’s father) to the Presbyterian Synod of Manitoba in 1915.

The second section of this series consists of diaries and daybooks (largely the latter), beginning with an account of Dr. Solandt’s trip to Europe in the summer of 1929 while he was an undergraduate at the University of Toronto. Dr. Solandt kept only the occasional diary, of which three are represented in this series. The first is for May, 1945 as the war ended in Europe. The last two both cover his trip to Japan in October-December, 1945 to study the effects of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These diaries are followed by "CDRB's U.K. Visit" (undated); an account book of Solandt's visit to the United Kingdom in November, 1966, and his American address book.

The remainder of the volumes in this series are daybooks and “pocket diaries”, of which Dr. Solandt created a large number. In the former, usually with the manufacturer’s label of as “diary” or “date book”, he recorded his appointments and, occasionally, his expenses and other related notations. These date from 1941, when he first went to Lulworth, to 1988. The volumes for 1945, 1947,1948, 1957, 1958, 1979, and 1986 are absent, either because they were never kept or, perhaps, were not written up in the same manner. For 1945, for instance, there are entries for January, June, and July in two different volumes, but none for the whole year. For two years (1956; 1971, where the second volume has "Mayo Muir" below Dr. Solandt's name and the entries are not in his hand) there are two volumes.

The "pocket diaries" complement the appointment books. The earliest year represented is 1945, the latest, 1988. There are no volumes for 1948-1951, 1953, 1957, and 1959-1965. For 1958, there are also two volumes containing notes on Dr. Solandt's European trip in March and appointments for another in July, and "at a glance" volumes both for 1958 and 1959.

For accounts of travel experiences, either for pleasure or work, see Series 11: Canoe trips and Series 13: Travel.

Biographical and personal records

The series consists of biographical and personal records of Professor Bay. The material reflects his personal life, and includes press clippings, articles, and a thesis about him; personal documents such as educational records; documents of identification; personal papers related to life events (baptism, marriage, home ownership, inheritance, death certificates); calendars and a condolence scrapbook.

The arrangement of the material begins with biographical information (press clippings, biographies, curriculum vitae, referees, work about Bay), then personal papers, followed by what he termed “his personal collection”, consisting of items primarily in Norwegian relating to his family and Norway generally. The most intriguing portion of this “collection” is the folders of “illegal papers” [/002(28) – (30)] that Professor Bay buried when he hurriedly left Norway early in World War II and which he dug up sometime after he returned. There are also books about Norwegian resistance, and two books by his uncle.

Black (Davidson) Family fonds

  • UTA 1084
  • Fonds
  • 1871-2011

Personal records of the Davidson Black family, covering three generations, with particular reference to Davidson Black, the discoverer of Peking Man. Included are his diaries, extensive family correspondence and a few professional letters; files on his education, his employment, including his service in World War I but especially at Peking Union Medical College, his life in China generally, along with a few on his writings, and some artifacts. There is an extensive and well documented photo collection that helps tie the whole together. There are also a number of films made by Davidson Black between the late 1920s and 1932.

Black (Davidson) Family

Blessed

This item is a 5 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled ‘Blessed’, published in Living Prayer, Vol. 25, No.4, July-August, 1992, pp. 3 – 7. This article is identified as an excerpt from a forthcoming book by Nouwen entitled, The Life of the Beloved. Nouwen opens with two stories of blessing; one about a young man at a Bar Mitzvah being blessed by his parents and the other about a woman at the L’Arche community of Daybreak asking for a blessing. In each story Nouwen speaks of our need to be blessed, ‘To give someone a blessing is the most significant affirmation we can offer’. Nouwen goes on, ‘ We also need an ongoing blessing that allows us to hear in an ever-new way that we belong to a loving God who will never leave us alone…’ Nouwen goes on to offer two suggestions for claiming our blessedness. The first is prayer in which, over time as we learn stillness, we can ‘hear’ God’s word of blessing. The second is ‘the cultivation of presence’. In this, Nouwen suggests, we learn to be present to the blessings that come to us each day, no matter how busy or unhappy or worried. Nouwen concludes, ‘ As you and I walk the streets of the cities in which we live, we can have no illusions about the darkness…Yet all of these people yearn for a blessing. That blessing can be given only by those who have heard it themselves.’

Boisen and the case method: roots of the case method in the work of Richard Cabot

This item is a 21 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled, ‘Boisen and the Case Method’, published in The Chicago Theological Seminary Register, Boisen Centennial Issue, Winter 1977, Vol. LXVII No.1. The first section entitled ‘ Roots of the Case Method in the work of Richard Cabot’, outlines Boisen’s meeting with Dr Richard C. Cabot, MD at the Andover Theological Seminary. Nouwen states, ‘The meeting of Cabot and Boisen not only made the start of the clinical training movement possible, but also offered him the model for the theology through living human documents’. Nouwen discusses Cabot’s teaching and training methods and his idea for a clinical year for theological students. Nouwen discusses Cabot’s Clinicopathological Conferences. This work and the volume which resulted from it ‘gave Boisen the clue for much of his later work: the case study method. This method moved from the theoretical learning found in seminaries to the ‘investigation of living human documents’. When Boisen moved to be Chaplain at the Worcester State Hospital he insisted that he be allowed to do research and to have ‘free access to the case records, the right to visit patients on all the wards, to attend staff meetings where the cases being discussed and to be recognized as part of the therapeutic team’. Nouwen suggests that this was the beginning of the acceptance of Chaplains as an important part of the therapeutic program for patients. Nouwen describes Boisen’s core idea for the use of the case system, ‘that certain types of mental disorder and certain types of religious experience are alike attempts at reorganization…’ Nouwen then speaks of Boisen’s limitations in his understanding and use of the case system as relating to his own personal experience of mental illness. He then outlines a case history of ‘Jonah’ that Boisen frequently used in his teaching and as a tool for training. In conclusion, Nouwen says, ‘ …his idea of training is based on the theoretical principle that theology should derive it authority not from books, but as in every science worth of its name, from observable and controllable data…[Boisen says] I wanted them to learn to read human documents as well as books’.

Books

File includes two books: Test Pattern: Instructional Television at Scarborough College, University of Toronto by John A. Lee (1971); A History of Scarborough edited by Robert B. Bonis. The first is signed by Plumptre on the front end paper (1965). N.B. Books are not in a folder.

Books

File contains 1 book, 2 booklets, 1 poster; 3 artifacts and 1 book in total. First material is a book called "Decade Book"; highlights years of history of Scarborough College from 1962-1972; book by William E. Beckel, first dean of Scarborough College; book in B&W. First artifact is a booklet titled "University of Toronto Scarborough College" ; shows original diagrams and photos of Scarborough College; outlines college's educational philosophy, design philosophy, site features, use of the site and project order; complete booklet in B&W; middle portion of booklet has been torn from binding; no date or markings on booklet. Second artifact is poster with title "U of T Co-op, University of Toronto Scarborough; outlines co-op programs in Management and Computer Science; poster is in colour; picture of student on computer; no date or markings on poster. Third artifact is a booklet, titled "Scarborough college, University of Toronto"; contains photos and diagrams of Scarborough College similar to ones included in first booklet; contains information about Scarborough College's beginning, the site, the concept and the building; no year or date on booklet; no markings; booklet in perfect condition.

Aerial photographs; Architects; Architectural models and drawings; Architecture; Brutalism; Co- Op Management program, Computer Science program; Computers and technology; Concrete construction; Construction; Contemporary architecture; Department of Computer and Mathematics; Department of Management; Faculty; Humanities Wing; Scarborough (Ont.); Scarborough College; Science Wing; Sculpture; Students; Television studio; University Buildings; University of Toronto Scarborough Campus

Border regions of faith: an anthology of religion and social change

Item consists of a book in which Nouwen has written Chapter 42, beginning on p. 347, titled: "Christ of the Americas." The article was first published in America, 102 (April 21, 1984), and reflects, in part, on his feeling that "in order to come to know the living Christ among the people in the northern part of the Americas, I had to be willing to expose myself to the way the living Christ reveals Himself in the southern part of the Americas."

Brieven aan Marc: over Jezus en de zin van het leven

Item consists of a book of seven letters; the translated title is: Letters to Marc About Jesus. Nouwen wrote this book in response to a publisher friend named Herman Pijfers, and his suggestion that Nouwen write a book in Dutch. As well, the book was written in collaboration with Marc van Campen, Nouwen's nephew, who agreed to share a 'book of letters' about the spiritual life. The book has been divided into the following: Preface; Letter 1. Jesus: the Heart of Our Existence; Letter 2. Jesus: the God Who Sets Us Free; Letter 3. Jesus: the Compassionate God; Letter 4. Jesus: the Descending God; Letter 5. Jesus: the Loving God; Letter 6. Jesus: the Hidden God; Letter 7. Listening to Jesus; Index of Biblical Quotations.

Brieven van lezers

Item consists of an article which criticizes Nouwen's article "Toekomstige parkeerplaats tussen de sterren" [according to a brief translation].

British Association for the Advancement of Science fonds

  • UTA 1082
  • Fonds
  • 1897, 1924

Fonds consists of 2 accessions

B1987-0045: Photo of 1924 meeting of the Association; the University of Toronto professors represented are Charles Ryle Fay and Robert Morrison MacIver.

B2009-0026: Bound volume of printed programmes, tickets, blank forms, published notices etc. re activities at the Toronto meeting of the Association in August 1897.

British Association for the Advancement of Science

Broken

This item is a 5- page article by Henri Nouwen entitled, ‘Broken’ published in ‘Living Prayer’ by Living Prayer Inc., Barre, VT, Vol. 26, No. 2, March – April 1993, pp. 3 – 7. This item is a slightly abbreviated chapter from Nouwen’s book ‘Life of the Beloved’. Nouwen is writing this as a letter to a secular friend. Nouwen begins by saying ‘Our sufferings and pains are not simply bothersome interruptions of our lives; rather they touch us in our uniqueness…the way I am broken tells you something unique about me’. Nouwen goes on to suggest that the most painful brokenness in society is what he calls ‘inner brokenness – a brokenness of the heart’. He suggests that the reaction of many is to feel rejected, alone and cast out by God. Nouwen offers two ways we may respond to our brokenness: befriending it and second, putting it under the blessing. Nouwen suggests that though looking the brokenness in the eye and befriending it is counter-cultural because we want to move away from pain, it is the way to healing. Nouwen then goes on to write about putting brokenness under the blessing as in fact, a precondition for befriending it. ‘Then our brokenness will gradually come to be seen as an opening toward the full acceptance of ourselves as the Beloved’. Nouwen concludes with some comments about how the music of Leonard Bernstein has helped him to understand what he is now writing about.

But what then can we do

This item is a one page article by Henri Nouwen entitled ‘But what then can we do?’ published in Alive Now! November-December, 1991, p. 47. It is the second article by Nouwen featured in this publication. The first article is entitled 'There's a lot of pain...' The theme of this issue is ‘Loneliness’ and this article is identified as an excerpt from Nouwen’s ‘Reaching Out’. Nouwen begins by asking ‘But what then can we do with our essential aloneness which so often breaks into our consciousness as the experience of a desperate sense of loneliness?’ Nouwen goes on to speak of the need to convert our loneliness into a fruitful solitude.

Called from darkness: a Lutheran worship celebration in support of the second special session on disarmament of the United Nations at jazz vespers

This item is a 7 page talk given by Henri Nouwen entitled ‘Called from Darkness’ given to a Lutheran Worship Celebration in support of the Second Special Session on Disarmament of the United Nations at Jazz Vespers, published in Sermons at St. Peter’s Church, Sunday, June 13, 1982. Nouwen identifies his intention in this talk to reflect on a ‘spirituality of peacemaking’ using three key words: prayer, resistance and community. In his discussion of prayer Nouwen first speaks of the difference between speaking out of our needs: for affection, attention, power and speaking from our relationship with God rooted in prayer. ‘Now prayer is that slow process in which we move away from that dark sticky place of our needs into the light of Christ’. Nouwen also identifies prayer as an act of resistance, ‘resistance against this needy, sucking and frightening go-around’. Nouwen then reflects on the word resistance. ‘Resistance means to say No! No! No! against all the forces of death’. Nouwen speaks about the power then of life and our resistance to it and that is our struggle not just in the big things in life but the small. Nouwen goes on to suggest that resistance is not just to say No! but even more to say yes. ‘Resistance in the deepest sense means to continuously proclaim that God is a God of the living, that God is a God of life’. Nouwen also states that ‘Resistance is prayer because it is a proclamation and a confession of the living God’. In discussing the third word ‘community’, Nouwen identifies community as the place of prayer and resistance. The person who acts towards peace with the support of community is rooted in a place of acceptance and forgiveness. Nouwen concludes the talk by saying that he believes the most important point is that ‘community is to be a Eucharistic community’.

Called to be hosts

This item is a 2 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled: Called to be Hosts, published in Faith/At/Work, September, 1976, p 30-31. Nouwen begins the article by stating ‘The call to ministry is the call to be a host to the many strangers passing by. In this world full of strangers…we search for a hospitable place, where life can be found’. Nouwen speaks then of our ambivalent feelings towards the stranger of both fear and attraction and suggests that ‘during the last years strangers have become more subject to hostility than to hospitality’. Nouwen then goes on to speak of the way in which a minister is to offer healing hospitality to the stranger. He speaks of the need to offer a space where the stranger can grow to be himself. ‘This will come to pass only when ministry is undergirded by spirituality, that is, when the outer movement from hostility to hospitality is supported by an inner movement from property to poverty. Poverty means that my identity in the final analysis is not determined by what I can do or think, but by what God’s Spirit can do, say, and think in me.’ Nouwen concludes, ‘When poverty enables us to create a friendly space for the stranger and to convert hostility into hospitality, then the stranger might be willing to show his real face’.

Canada House

Ruth Church was employed as the head librarian at Canada House in London from September 1945 to March 1950. She was the first permanent librarian hired by the Canadian High Commission and was tasked with building up the library almost from scratch, while serving the demands of the Canadian diplomatic corps and facilitating the use of the library by Canadians based in or travelling through London and interested members of the public.

She nearly lost her job when she married in 1948, as the Civil Service Commission’s policy was that once married, she would be supported by her husband and therefore would be replaced by an unmarried librarian as soon as possible. She appealed on the basis that she would be supporting her husband while he was a student at Oxford and was allowed to remain on with her full salary and allowances. In April 1949, her contract was renewed for six-months and, on request, for a further six months until 28 February 1950, which was extended to 31 March until her replacement arrived from Canada. During this period she fought back against the Department of External Affairs’ decision to reduce her allowance and the Receiver General’s clawback of portions of her salary. Forty-five years later she publicly objected to the closure of the Library and of Canada House and lived to attend its reopening in 1998.

The files in this series contain correspondence, salary stubs, poetry, reports, a manuscript, and articles.

Canada/Newfoundland Royal Commission on the Ocean Ranger Marine Disaster

When the Ocean Ranger oil rig tipped over in the Atlantic on 15 April, 1982, it set in motion an inquiry which involved two royal commissions, one federal and the other provincial (Newfoundland) which, due to a public outcry, were forced to amalgamate. David Grenville, secretary of the Commission, drew on advice from Dr. Solandt for the second volume of the report, which addressed safety on the oil rigs. An important part of this exercise was the convening of a conference in St. John

Canadian Forestry Advisory Council

While Dr. Solandt was working on his report for the PPRIC, it became apparent that the amount of forestry research being done in Canada was declining every year. Pierre Gendron proposed that the CFAC should commission a quick survey of the volume of forestry research being done in every agency that could be located in Canada. A Steering Committee was created to execute the study, which was carried out by Dr. Solandt in 1979.

The correspondence, notes, minutes, memoranda, reports, drafts of reports, and replies to questionnaires document the procedures and methodology that Dr. Solandt undertook in preparing his report.

Canadian National Railways

In the latter months of 1955, Omond Solandt began arranging his departure from the Defence Research Board to take up the position of Vice-President, Research and Development of Canadian National Railways, a position he held from 1 March, 1956 to 1 July, 1963.

This series contains correspondence, addresses, press clippings, reports, articles and photoprints (see Series 46) relating largely to the scientific research carried out by the Research and Development Department.

Canoe trips

Dr. Solandt was introduced to canoes at an early age but did not take up the sport seriously until he was 41. The group that assembled for the first canoe trip into Quetico Park in 1952 formed the core of what subsequently became the

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