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UTSC Photographic Services fonds

  • CA UTSC 001
  • Fonds
  • [ca.1960]-2010

The UTSC Photographic Services fonds covers the years of approximately 1964 and 1966 to 2008. The collection represents an invaluable visual history of the University of Toronto Scarborough campus and is made up almost entirely of photographic materials – negatives, contact sheets, slides, and prints.

Photographs in the collection from the 1970s to 1994 are attributed to David Harford and photographs from 1994 onward are attributed to Ken Jones. Photographs cover a broad range of subjects, such as the buildings and grounds of UTSC, campus events, faculty, staff, students, and much more.

Material is arranged into the following series:
• Series A: Slides
• Series B: Negatives and Contact Sheets
• Series C: Photographic Prints

Subject terms include:
Academic Resource Centre
Actors
Aerial photographs
African Studies program
Alumni
Alumni and alumnae
Alumni Association
Andrews, John, 1933-
Anthropology
Applied Microbiology program
Architectural models and drawings
Architecture
Architecture and recreation
Art History program
Arts and Administration Building
Arts and crafts movement
Arts Management program
Artwork
Athletics and recreation
Automobiles
Award ceremonies
Badminton
Baird/Sampson Associates, Architects
Ball, John L.
Band (Instrumental group)
Banquets
Basketball
Biodiversity, Ecology & Evolution program
Biology program
Birgeneau, Robert
Bissell, Claude Thomas, 1916-2000
Bladen Library
Bladen Wing
Bladen, Vincent Wheeler
Brutalism
Building damage
Buses
Business Administration program
Campbell, D. R. (Ralph)
Canadian 20th century Catalogs
Cellular and Molecular Biology program
Centre for French and Linguistics
Ceremonies and celebrations
Certificate in Business program
Chancellor
Cheerleading
Chemistry program
Choir (Musical group)
City Studies
Classical Studies program
Co-Op Management program
Computer Science program
Computers and technology
Concrete construction
Conferences and symposia
Construction
Contemporary architecture
Convocation
Correspondence
Cubism
Dean
Department of Arts, Culture and Media
Department of Biological Sciences
Department of Computer and Mathematics
Department of English
Department of Historical and Cultural Studies
Department of Management
Department of Philosophy
Department of Physical & Environmental Sciences
Department of Psychology
Department of Social Sciences
Diamond and Schmitt Architects
Diaspora & Transnationalism Studies
Diefenbaker, John G., 1895-1979
Donations
Doris McCarthy Gallery
Economics program
Educational television
English program
Environmental Science program
Equestrian
Events - Performances
Exhibitions
F.B. Watts Memorial Lecture
Faculty
Fire
Flood
Foley, Joan
Football
French program
Functionalism
Gallery
Geography
Glass construction
Global Asia Studies program
Governing Council
Governing Council
Greene, Edward Brodhead, 1855-1950
Ground breaking ceremonies
Health
Health Studies
Highland Creek Valley (Ont.)
History program
Hockey
Humanities Wing
Instructional Centre
Integrative Biology program
International Development Studies
International Studies
Journalism program
Kung, Hans, 1928-
Kuwabara, Payne, McKenna, Blumberg Architects
Laboratories
Languages program
Laurence, Margaret, 1926-1987
Lectures
Lewis, Stephen, 1937-
Librarians
Library
Library architecture
Library buildings
Lieutenant Governors--Ontario Linguistics program
Literature and film studies program
MacKay-Lyons, Brian
MacKenzie, Lewis, 1940- Management Wing
Mathematics program
Mayor
McCarthy, Doris, 1910-2010
Media Studies program
Meeting Place
Meetings
Mental Health Studies program
Microbiology
Miller-Lash House
Minimalism
Mirvish, Ed, 1914-2007
Montgomery Sisam Architects Moriyama & Teshima
Music & Culture program
New Media Studies program
Old Biology Building
Ombudsman
Onley, David C.
Open house
Opening ceremonies
Orchestra
Paramedicine program
Pearson, Lester B., 1897-1972
Performances
Phase 2
Philosophy program
Physics and Astrophysics program Plumptre, A. F. W. (Arthur FitzWalter Wynne), 1907-1977
President
Principal
Pritchard, Robert
Professors
Programmes
Provost
Psychology program
Public Policy
Rationalism
Recreation Wing
Registrar
Religion program
Residential architecture
Riding
Scarborough (Ont.)
Scarborough College
Scarborough College Council
Scarborough College Student Council
Scarborough College. Gallery Science Wing
Sculpture
Social Sciences Building Sociology
Stables
Staff
Stantec Consulting
Statistics program
Structuralism
Student Centre
Student government
Student groups
Student residences
Student unions
Students
Students and libraries
Students and teachers
Students--Art
Students--Athletics and recreation Students--Drama
Students--Fiction
Students--Humour
Students--Literary collections Students--Music
Students--Periodicals
Students--Poetry
Students--Political activity Students--Scholarships, fellowships, etc. Students, Graduate
Students, part time
Studio program
Studios
Studying
Sustainable architecture
Suzuki, David, 1936-
Television studio
Temporary buildings
Tennis
Theatre
Theatre & Performance Studies program
Thompson, R. Paul, 1947-
Toronto Transit Commission Transportation
Trudeau, Pierre Elliott, 1919-2000
University Buildings
University of Toronto at Scarborough. Gallery
University of Toronto. Scarborough Campus.
Women's and Gender Studies program UTSC Library
Vernacular architecture
Vice-principal
Volleyball
Women's and Gender Studies program

University of Toronto. Scarborough Campus. Photographic Services.

John Davidson Ketchum fonds

  • UTA 1451
  • Fonds
  • [189-]-1970

Fonds consists of 2 accessions

B1969-0004: Collection of songs, poems and skits of a humorous nature directly related to the faculty and students of the Department of Psychology. Most of the work is by J.D. Ketchum, but some is by students and other members of staff. (1 box, 1929-1961)

B1974-0072: Ketchum Family correspondence and papers. Personal correspondence and diaries of John Davidson Ketchum; "Ruhleben" manuscript: drafts of chapters, research materials including articles on Ruhleben Prison Camp, 1914-1918 (c1961); student notes, BA and MA theses. Addresses, papers, articles in psychology. The majority of these papers concern Prof. Ketchum's experiences and research regarding the Ruhleben prison camp. Photographs of Ketchum family members. (41 boxes, 1897-1970)

Ketchum, John Davidson

Norwood Family fonds

  • UTA 1619
  • Fonds
  • 1906-1953

Correspondence, curricula notes, photographs, diary, offprints of Gilbert Norwood. Some personal papers of Frances M. H. Norwood. Photographs include members of the Norwood family; men and women of the Canadian General Hospital No. 4 (University of Toronto) posing on front of University College. (Photoprint of Canadian General Hospital No. 4 taken by Panoramic Camera Co., Toronto.)

B2018-0005 contains a file of mimeographed and annotated copies of two one-act plays by Gilbert Norwood: "Brightening the Classics: a college farce in one act" and and "Pandora's Box", written in 1932 and 1933 and produced in the theatre space at the University College Women's Union in 1934, with a covering letter from Ruth Davidson, wife of Edward ("Ted") Moss Davidson (BA, UC 1934) who acted in both plays.

Norwood Family

Stuart Grenville Hennessey fonds

  • UTA 1371
  • Fonds
  • 1920-1985

Personal records of Dr. Hennessey documenting his academic activities as professor in Dept. of Political Economy, especially with Extension and Professional Association education. Includes correspondence (1949-1985), lecture notes and course outlines (1933-1983); student assignments, student marks, essays and examinations (printed) (1924-1983); subject files; photographs.

Hennessey, Stuart Grenville

Publishing

This series contains mainly galleys of pasted text for what is presumed to be Kaleidoscopes: selected writings of H.S.M. Coxeter. It also includes approximately 150-200 geometrical drawings, some original, others printed, but presumably most drawn by Coxeter for his many publications. Finally one file contains a typescript entitled “Summary of the first six chapters of Coxeter’s Projective Geometry, 1964”.

Series also contains copies of Professor Coxeter's publications on mathematical problems that have been translated into other languages. This series does not contain any manuscripts to any of the 12 books Coxeter wrote. Series 2, Professional Correspondence, contains some correspondence with publishers regarding some of his books.

Lorraine C. Smith fonds

  • UTA 1787
  • Fonds
  • 1949-1959

Student course notes, exercises, laboratory reports, examinations, and other records relating to Dr. Smith's undergraduate and graduate courses as a student in physiology, biochemistry, physics, etc at the University of Toronto.

Smith, Lorraine C.

Ken Koyama Papers

  • CA OTUTF MS COLL 00670
  • Manuscript Collection
  • 1987-1992

Small collection of printed material regarding Japanese Canadian immigrants after WWII .

Koyama, Ken

Correspondence

The correspondents in this series number just under four hundred individuals, of whom sixty-two read and commented on the entire manuscript (these names are listed on page 723 of the 2002 hardcover edition). The correspondents include Professor Friedland’s research assistants, archivists in the University of Toronto Archives, officials and editors at the University of Toronto Press, other editors, writers and independent researchers with an interest in the University’s history, and members of the public that Professor Friedland met in the course of his research and his giving of talks about the history of the University. The majority of the correspondents are academics and administrative personnel at the University of Toronto and elsewhere who were asked for information or offered their expertise. Some of the correspondence is post-publication reaction to the book.

The research assistants (in addition to those listed in Series I), are Sara Burke, David Bronskill, Colin Grey, Graham Rawlinson and Katrina Wyman. Of the staff in the University of Toronto Archives, Harold Averill was seconded part-time to the project to direct the researchers to the appropriate sources in the University Archives, to offer his knowledge of the history of the University and to read the manuscript. Other correspondents from the Archives are Garron Wells (University Archivist), Marnee Gamble (special media archivist) and Loryl MacDonald (administrative records archivist). The University of Toronto Press, the publisher of the book, is represented by Val Cooke, Ani Deyirmenjian, Malgosia Halliop, Bill Harnum, Anne Laughlin,
Melissa Pitts, and Ron Schoeffel. Presidents (past and current) of the University represented are: Robert Birgeneau, Claude Bissell, George Connell, Robert Prichard, and David Strangway. Some of the academics and university administrators forwarded drafts of articles or excerpts from books they were writing, while others commented on the manuscript or portions thereof. Papers or lengthy memoranda and reports are present on a cross-section of activities, disciplines themes and individuals relating to the University including (with the names of the correspondents in brackets). They include the admission of women (Sara Burke), botanical gardens (John Court), chemistry (Susanne McClelland), Connaught Laboratories (George Connell), engineering (Richard White), fees policy (David Stager), gays and lesbians (David Rayside), Jacob Hirschfelder (Sheldon J. Godfrey), Margaret Eaton School (John Byl), history of medicine (Jacalyn Duffin), medicine (David Bronskill), No. 4 General Hospital at Salonika, Greece during World War I (Mary Louise Gaby), philosophy (John Slater), the proposed Wolfe’s University (D. V. Anderson), women (Katrina Wyman), and women in graduate studies (Natalie Zemon Davis).

In addition to letters, the files may contain articles, notes, memoranda, background documents and publications, and the occasional press clipping A few of the files contain historical items, dating back to 1887, that had belonged early graduates and were forwarded by their descendants, Professor Friedland’s correspondents. The detailed comments on the drafts of the book by the correspondents in this series may, for the most part, be found in Series 4.

Ernest Fidlar fonds

  • UTA 1267
  • Fonds
  • 1908-1953

Fonds consists of records created by both Ernest Findlar, professor of medicine at the University of Toronto. Includes research, drafts, correspondence, and material related to his service in WWI. Fonds also includes letters written by Gladys Aileen East (his wife) back home when she attended Alma College in the 1920s. Fonds also includes a family tree. See file list for more details.

Fidlar, Ernest

Ernest (“Van”) Douglass fonds

  • UTA 1221
  • Fonds
  • 1949-1985; (predominant 1970-1985)

Correspondence, notes, brochures, press clippings, and publications documenting Professor Douglass' career as a speech - language pathologist; includes an audiotape of the "Song of Thanksgiving", n.d., written and sung by one of his students.

Douglass, Ernest (“Van”)

University of Toronto. Office of Convocation fonds

  • UTA 0150
  • Fonds
  • 1892-2017

This fonds contains 35 accessions

A2008-0006: Official Convocation Roll Book 2007 consists of Diplomas Upgraded to Honours, In Absentia Graduates, Spring and Fall Convocations. User copy available.

A1992-0011: Amendments to convocation rolls for 1988 as recorded in January, 1989, and for 1991 as recorded in January, 1992.

A1992-0017: Official Convocation roll book

A1993-0005: Official Convocation roll book and changes processed in 1992. Unofficial printed set in print room.

A1994-0005: Convocation Roll for the year 1993 and approved changes from 1952 to 1993; Unofficial printed set in print room

A1995-0002: Amendments to the Convocation Roll book vols. 1969 to v.1996 processed in 1997. No changes were made in vols. 1970-1977; 1979-1981; Convocation Roll Book 1997.

A1996-0002: 1995 convocations and changes from 1956-1995; lists of diplomas upgraded to honours and in absentia graduates included. Unofficial printed set in print room.

A2002-0002: Official changes to Convocation Roll Books processed in the year 2001 relating to vols from 1970 to 2000 including re-issued diplomas in Bachelor of Laws (LL.B) and Juris Doctor (JD) for graduates in 1939 -2000.
Official University of Toronto Convocation Roll Book for 2001 with amendments. NB: Trinity College programme was not received.

A1997-0001: Convocation Roll Book for 1996. Unofficial printed set in print room.

A1998-0002: Amendments to the Convocation Roll book vols. 1969 to v.1996 processed in 1997. No changes were made in vols. 1970-1977; 1979-1981; Convocation Roll Book 1997.

A1999-0002: Convocation Roll Book 1998 and amendments as recorded in February 1999 with reference to rolls 1973 to 1998.

A2000-0002: Amendments processed in 1999 to Convocation Roll vols. 1970 to 1998 and Convocation Roll Book 1999.

A2001-0008: Amendments processed in 2000 to Convocation Roll volume 1969 to vol. 2000.

A2001-0020: Correspondence, reports, minutes of meetings and statistical data prepared for "Student Statistics" publications, for the federal and provincial governments, university officials, academic divisions, other institutions on various categories relating to students, teaching staff, alumni, women, enrolment, withdrawal and other data required to allocate university entitlement to operating grants, basic income unit and fees. Some statistical data relate to information from 1843.

A2003-0001: Official Convocation Roll consists of Amendments (1952-2001), Diplomas Upgraded to Honours (1982-2002), In Absentia Graduates, Spring and Fall Convocations (2002).

A2004-0004: Official Convocation Roll 2003 consists of Diplomas Upgraded to Honours, In Absentia Graduates, conferring of degrees in the Spring and in the Fall Convocations including conferment of honorary degrees, the installation of the 31st Chancellor and the graduation ceremony in Hong Kong. Some copies are annotated; User copy in the Print Room.

A2005-0009: Official Convocation Roll consists of Diplomas Upgraded to Honours, In Absentia Graduates (01), Spring (02-03) and Fall Convocations (04). User copy in the print room.

A2006-0009: Official Convocation Roll Book 2005 consists of Diplomas Upgraded to Honours, In Absentia Graduates, Spring and Fall Convocations. User copy available.

A2007-0001: Official Convocation Roll Book 2007 consists of Diplomas Upgraded to Honours, In Absentia Graduates, Spring and Fall Convocations. User copy available.

A2009-0004: Amendments to Convocation Roll Books vols. 1982 to 2007 processed from January to December 31, 2008 ; the changes are listed by the year of graduation.

A2009-0005: Official Convocation Roll consists of In Absentia graduates, Diploma Upgraded to Honours, Undergraduate and graduate faculties, affiliated colleges and federated universities, Asia Pacific [Hong Kong], Spring and Fall convocations. User copy available.

A2010-0004: Official Convocation Roll consists of In Absentia graduates, University of Toronto undergraduate and graduate faculties, affiliated colleges, and federated universities. User copy available.

A2011-0001: Amendments to Convocation Roll Books vols. 1962-2010 processed from January 1, 2009 to December 31, 2010. The changes are listed by the year of graduation to facilitate filing.

A2011-0003: Official Convocation Roll consists of In Absentia graduates, University of Toronto undergraduate and graduate faculties, affiliated colleges, and federated universities. User copy available.

A2014-0016: Official Convocation Roll consists of In Absentia graduates, University of Toronto undergraduate and graduate faculties, affiliated colleges, and federated universities. User copy available.

A2014-0017: Official Convocation Roll consists of In Absentia graduates, University of Toronto undergraduate and graduate faculties, affiliated colleges, and federated universities. User copy available.

A2014-0018: Official Convocation Roll consists of In Absentia graduates, University of Toronto undergraduate and graduate faculties, affiliated colleges, and federated universities. User copy available.

A2015-0001:Amendments to Convocation Roll Books vols. 1967-2014 ( 1967-2014) processed from January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2014. The changes are listed by the year of graduation to facilitate filing.

A2015-0013: Official Convocation Roll consists of In Absentia graduates, University of Toronto undergraduate and graduate faculties, affiliated colleges, and federated universities. User copy available.

A2016-0010: Official Convocation Roll consists of In Absentia graduates, University of Toronto undergraduate and graduate faculties, affiliated colleges, and federated universities.

A2017-0007: Amendments to Convocation Roll Books 2016

A2018-0001: Amendments to Convocation Roll Books 2017

A2018-0008: Official roll (unbound) 2017

A2019-0024: Convocation Roll Books, In Absentia Graduates, Diplomas Upgraded to Honours from 2000, and Convocation Roll Books Amendments Processed in 2013.

University of Toronto. Office of Convocation

James Patton fonds

  • UTA 1647
  • Fonds
  • 1845-1863

Collection of 8 pamphlets relating to University of Toronto with mss annotations by James Patton. Pamphlets included are: "The university question considered: by a graduate" (1845), "Wesleyan conference memorial on the question of liberal education in Upper Canada, explained and defended by numerous proofs and illustrations, by a committee".(1860), "University reform. Report of the resolutions adopted at a great public meeting of the inhabitants of Kingston..." (1861), "Address before the select committee of the Legislative Assembly appointed to inquire into the management of the University of Toronto..." by Daniel Wilson (1860), "Report of the commissioners appointed to enquire into the expenditure of the funds of the University of Toronto, and into the state of its financial affairs..." (1862), "University reform defended: in reply to six editorials of the 'Globe' and 'Leader'..." by a committee of the Wesleyan Conference (1863), "Defence of the plan of University reform proposed by the Senate of the University of Toronto..." (1863), "Statutes of the University of Toronto, 1857".

Patton, James

Clara Elland Clinkscale fonds

  • UTA 1158
  • Fonds
  • 1889-1959

Course notes and textbooks belonging to Clara E. Clinkscale when she was a student in the Faculty of Arts at University College (BA 1912); problem sets, experiments and exam papers from the years she taught in the Department of Physics during the Second World War.

Clinkscale, Clara Elland

Lachlan Taylor Burwash fonds

  • UTA 1095
  • Fonds
  • 1889-1895

Contains notebooks, assignments and a textbook of Lachlan Taylor Burwash, who studied Mining Engineering at the School of Practical Science from 1893-1897. Included are Applied Chemistry (1893); Applied Chemistry II (1894?); Physics (1894); Dynamics and Kinematics (1894); Constructive Design and Surveying (1895). Also three general notebooks (1889, 1894, 1895) and assignments and a textbook from Book-keeping (1891).

Burwash, Lachlan Taylor

John Drennan Hamilton fonds

  • UTA 1343
  • Fonds
  • 1939-1973; (predominant 1959-1973)

Consists of correspondence (1966-1972), reports and notes on medical education and on the Presidential Committee on Hospital-University Relations (1959-1960), papers and addresses (1960-1973). Also includes publications (1939-1947).

Hamilton, John Drennan

French Theatre Collection

  • CA OTUTF MS COLL 00146 2B Annex
  • Manuscript Collection
  • [ca.1860]-1950

Plays in manuscript and typescript, articles, clippings, reviews and photographs pertaining to theatre in the French language.

James Scarth Gale Papers

  • CA OTUTF MS COLL 00245
  • Manuscript Collection
  • 1863-1937

Drafts of writings about Korea and translations of Korean texts; commonplace books, diaries, correspondence, family papers, photographs, his collection of manuscripts, photographs, printed appearances.

Gale, James Scarth

Mary Gilliam Papers

  • CA OTUTF MS COLL 00453
  • Manuscript Collection
  • 1928-1988

Collection consists primarily of material related to the British writer and poet Kenneth Hopkins. It includes correspondence Hopkins wrote in the 1960s to Franklin Gilliam, who at the time was proprietor of the Brick Row Book Shop, as well as a number of original Hopkins manuscripts from the late 1920s and early 1930s.

Gilliam, Mary

Martin Ahvenus Papers

  • CA OTUTF MS COLL 00574
  • Manuscript Collection
  • [192-]-2006

This collection of papers from the famed Toronto bookseller includes administrative records from his shop Village Books, including invoices, correspondence, book lists, as well as individual files related to the running of the store and the publishing arm of Village Books. It also contains material related to Ahvenus’ work as an appraiser, correspondence with various Canadian authors, a travel diary from 1993-94, and books, many of them signed and inscribed by the authors.

Avenus, Martin

M.R. Appell Papers

Collection consists of correspondence, including letters from Nelson Ball, J.W. Curry and Douglas Henderson, as well as poetry booklets created by Appell and small press imprints and publications.

Appell, M. R. (Melvin Robert)

Gilbert Bagnani Papers

  • CA OTUTF MS COLL 00265 2B Annex
  • Manuscript Collection
  • [1835?]-1980

A collection of volumes and papers from the library of Professor Gilbert Bagnani and his wife, Stewart Bagnani. It includes manuscripts collected by them or relating to their library.

Bagnani, Gilbert

Gerry Bennett Papers

  • CA OTUTF MS COLL 00362
  • Manuscript Collection
  • 1952-1998

Collection of papers from Gerry Bennett (1921-1999), ornithologist and author. He wrote and published the journal Birdfinding in Canada (1981-1989) and at least three books on birdwatching and birdwatchers. The papers consist of: GB's typed journals recording his bird sightings and other observations of natural history from the 1950s to 1998; his correspondence with naturalists from the late 1970s to 1990s; his research notes and files on ornithological topics, including bird records and lists for a variety of locations, and the newsletters from a number of ornithological organizations; drafts and typescripts of some of his writings.

Bennett, Gerry

Karl Schofield Bernhardt Papers

  • CA OTUTF MS COLL 00368
  • Manuscript Collection
  • 1926-1970

Collection of notes, drafts and manuscripts for articles, lectures and addresses by Bernhardt.

Bernhardt, Karl Schofield

William Craig Heron fonds

  • UTA 1375
  • Fonds
  • 1968-1972

Consists of files containing correspondence, reports, pamphlets, newspaper clippings, newsletters and periodicals, dealing with university discipline, the library crisis, Berkeley student protests, the 1971 University of Toronto Act, women's liberation, daycare, SAC, Glendon Forum, unemployment, student aid, Canadian Union of Students, drugs, and other student and education-related topics.

Heron, Craig

June Seel fonds

  • UTA 1758
  • Fonds
  • 1973

Copy of "Erindale College Library, the Early Years", a history of the Library submitted by Mrs. June Seel for the Histories of Libraries course at the Faculty of Library Science. Appendices contain original photographs and examples of publications of Erindale College Library.

Seel, June

Mykhailo Sytnyk Papers

  • CA OTUTF MS COLL 00578
  • Manuscript Collection
  • 1939-1982

The collection consists of correspondence between Sytnyk and his mother in Ukraine, whom he found in the last years of his life; other relatives in Ukraine; and his wife Hanna Cherin. The letters from Volodymyr Vynnychenko, a writer and political leader, forms the large part of the correspondence. The collection also includes some of Sytnyk's personal documents. The collection also contains many photographs of Sytnyk. They were taken when he was living in Lviv, Kyiv, Germany, and the United States. He was photographed with famous Ukrainian literary figures, such as, for example, IaUri- Kosach and IaUri- Klen (pseud. of Oswald Burghardt). The collection also contains Sytnyk's publications. These include two of his manuscripts, and a number of clippings of his poetry published in different periodicals. The collection also includes many articles about Sytnyk. In addition, the collection consists of material collected by John Luczkiw for a collection of Sytnyks poetry entitled TaSvit paporoti (Flower of the Fern). Luczkiw compiled the bibliography of Sytnyks works that was incorporated into the publication. The collection is organized into six series: biographical records, correspondence, publications, photographs, bibliographical materials, and miscellaneous.

Sytnyk, Mykhailo

Dossier Gustave Toudouze, secondary sources

  • Georges G. Toudouze, «La colonie artistique de Camaret», Les Cahiers de l’Iroise, 1955.
  • James Sanders, «Une lettre inédite de Gustave Toudouze à Georges Ancey, relative au “Bateau des sorcières”», Les cahiers de l’Iroise, 1994.
  • James Sanders, «Camaret, hâvre de pêcheurs et d’artistes», La Revue de l’Université Laval, octobre 1963.
  • André Dupuis, Une famille d’artistes. Les Toudouze-Colin-Leloir, 1690-1957, Paris, 1957.
  • Typed document (1 page): summary of an interview with Georges G. Toudouze.
  • Typed document (5 pages): draft of an article on Gustave Toudouze (by Sanders).
  • Photocopies of an article: Dr. M.-A. Levy-Alcover, «Le foyer artistique de Camaret: à propos de deux artistes dramatiques», in Nautisme, arts, culture, été 1990.

Dan Bender Zoo collection

  • CA UTSC 008
  • Collection
  • [193-]-1966

The collection consists of movie posters, ads, trading cards, postcards, books, magazines and journals, related to Frank Buck (Frank Howard Buck (1884-1950), a renowned American hunter, animal collector, film director, actor author and producer. The collection also consists of material related to zoo displays and architecture, catalogues and books related to zoo and animal collecting, photographs off various zoo related animals found in different parts of America and a board game. The material is divided into five series:

  1. Frank Buck
  2. Chimpanzee performance
  3. Zoo Architecture and display
  4. Miscellaneous printed materials.
  5. Zoo photographs

Bender, Daniel E.

A.F.W. Plumptre fonds

  • CA UTSC 009
  • Fonds
  • 1964-1974

The fonds serves as a representative sample of the activities carried out, and the relationships engendered, during A.F.W. Plumptre's tenure as principal of Scarborough College from 1965 to 1972. Both official papers and personal documents are included. Official documents include: reports, correspondence, transcripts of speeches, and seating plans. Personal documents include: invitations, cards, photograph albums, clippings, publications, books, and artifacts.

Plumptre, A. F. W. (Arthur FitzWalter Wynne)

Books

File includes two books: Test Pattern: Instructional Television at Scarborough College, University of Toronto by John A. Lee (1971); A History of Scarborough edited by Robert B. Bonis. The first is signed by Plumptre on the front end paper (1965). N.B. Books are not in a folder.

Report on the possibility and desirability of love

This item consists of a two page article by Henri Nouwen entitled: On the possibility and desirability of love, published in The National Catholic Reporter, April 10. 1968, pp. 7-8. Nouwen begins his article by asking if love is possible at all. ‘Is there a spark of misunderstanding in every intimate encounter, a painful experience of separateness in every attempt to unite, a fearful resistance in every act of surrender?’ He then states that he intends to describe what he calls two main forms of existing: 1) a power or ‘taking’ form and 2) a forgiving form. He then finally intends to ask the crucial questions, ‘Is love a utopian dream or a possibility within our reach?’ There are three major headings in the article: 1) The taking form, 2) The forgiving form and 3)The possibility of love. In 1) Nouwen describes the taking form as a form of power. We objectify the other, we try to control, to manipulate vulnerabilities and weaknesses and classify and label others. ‘This leaves us with the suspicion that the reality which we call “love” is nothing other than a blanket to cover the real fact that a man and a woman conquer each other in a long, subtle skirmish of taking movements in which one is always the winner who manipulates the other… we find ourselves doomed to the impossibility of love’. In 2) Nouwen describes the forgiving form as one of trust, openness and vulnerability. He suggests some characteristics of love. Love is truthful, tender and asks for total disarmament. He asks: ‘Can we ever meet a fellow man without any protection? Reveal ourselves to him in our total vulnerability? In 3) The possibility of love, Nouwen attempts to answer these questions. He begins by noting that life is often a very painful fluctuation between the two desires to take and to forgive. ‘And we have good reasons to be afraid. Love means openness, vulnerability and confession.’ Again, Nouwen asks if real love is possible and answers by saying that it is not if ‘the only real and final solution to life is death’. He then points to the person who he suggests has broken through the vicious circle and quotes from the prologue to the Gospel of John which speaks of Jesus breakthrough. ‘Suddenly everything is converted into its opposite. Darkness into light, enslavement into freedom, death into life, taking into giving, destruction into creation and hatred into love’. He concludes by stating that ‘the core of the Christian message is exactly this message of the possibility of transcending the taking form of our human existence.

The death of Dr. King

This item consists of a one page article by Henri Nouwen entitled: The Death of Dr King, published in the National Catholic Reporter, December 18, 1968, p. 4. This article is a subjective reflection by Nouwen on the atmosphere, experience and people he encountered following the death of Dr Martin Luther King Jr. on April 4, 1968. Nouwen uses a number of headings : 1) The News – this begins in Chicago where he first hears of King’s assassination. He describes the muted responses of the people he meets, 'Martin Luther King was dead, killed, assassinated. Everybody knew it but nobody wanted to know it'. 2) The Party – Here Nouwen describes the atmosphere at a party following his talk and notes particularly that most people are avoiding speaking of Dr King’s death. 3) The Cool City – moves on to Topeka, Kansas where Nouwen reflects on the contrast between the ‘slickness and artificiality’ and ‘the madness’. ‘We were killing the prophets…Between the hollow voices of those who tried to advertise their latest product, it became clear that violence was cutting through the thresholds of restraint. Topeka seemed a cool and indifferent city’. 4) In Kansas City Nouwen visits a young man in prison for draft evasion. This young man speaks of the influence of Dr King on his life and the lives of his fellow prisoners and the atmosphere in the prison: ’when they heard that he was dead they doubled the guards. They did not understand that we were just crying, my Afro-American friends and me’. 5) The Cab Driver –this speaks of Nouwen’s decision to change his plans and travel to Atlanta for the funeral. He describes his encounter at the airport with a cab driver who is also going. The cab driver shares with Nouwen: ‘ Dr King just tried to take Christ’s words seriously. He realized he had to follow him all the way. What would happen if we really would do just that?’ The remainder of the article describes the atmosphere in Atlanta: ‘It was a special occasion in which happiness and joy merged with sadness and distress. Perhaps it had never been different for them.’ Nouwen concludes this article by reflecting on his hope despite all the ‘anger, grief and frustration’. ‘I knew that out of my exhaustion a new faith could grow, a faith that it is possible to love’.

Find your center

This item is a half page article by Henri Nouwen entitled: Find Your Center, published in the National Catholic Reporter, May 3, 1974. This article is a continuation of Nouwen’s article from the National Catholic Reporter, April 26, 1974. He introduces this article by saying,” To live a Christian life means to live in the world without being of it. It is in solitude that this inner freedom can grow”. The entire article is a development of his statement that” A life without a lonely place, that is, a life without a quiet center,, easily becomes destructive since by clinging to the results of our actions as our only way of self-identification we become possessive and defensive and tend to look at our fellow human beings more as enemies to be kept at a distance than as friends with whom we share the gifts of life”. Nouwen discusses the importance to Jesus of his times of solitude and silence which fed his ministry and enabled him to face his death. The article concludes,” When you are somewhere able to create the lonely place in the middle of your actions and concerns, your successes or failures can slowly lose some of their powers over you.”

Protecting intimacy

This item is a half page article by Henri Nouwen entitled, ‘Protecting Intimacy’ published in the National Catholic Reporter, May 10, 1974. Nouwen begins this article by stating,”A most painful thing to say is that intimate love does not take our loneliness away but protects it and converts it into solitude. Therefore intimacy is first of all a protecting intimacy allowing us to move from loneliness to solitude.” Nouwen then goes on to give an example of a family whose mode of living is to avoid pain in their relationships. Nouwen suggests that “this world is full of lonely people trying hard to love each other without succeeding. The question is if this is not largely due to the fact that we are not able to face the pain of our loneliness”. Nouwen concludes by stating,“ Intimacy,..does not mean entering the other with an intruding curiosity or a hungry need for satisfaction. Intimacy touches gently, intimacy does not take, but gives, does not suffocate but lets grow, does not conquer and possess but sets free and keeps free.”

Out of solitude, healing

This item is a half-page article by Henri Nouwen entitled, Out of Solitude, Healing, published in the National Catholic Reporter, c. May 24, 1974. Renewing the theme of solitude from his previous articles (April and May) Nouwen states, “In solitude history becomes Kairos, which means history converts from a random collection of disconnected events into a constant opportunity for a change of heart and mind”. He goes on to say in clarification, “When history becomes Kairos, I am called to search for hope even in the middle of crying cities, burning hospitals and desperate parents and children”. Kairos, Nouwen suggests brings the depths of the heart into the actions of mind and hand; in Kairos which we touch in solitude, our actions are transformed. Nouwen concludes, “Every time in history that men and women have been able to respond to the manifestations of evil and death as to a Kairos, a historic opportunity, an inexhaustible source of generosity and new life has been opened, offering hope far beyond the limits of human prediction”.

Openness can get stale

This item is a half-page article by Henri Nouwen entitled ‘Openness can get Stale’ published in the National Catholic Reporter, June 21, 1974, p. 13. Nouwen begins the article by stating, ‘There is a false form of honesty that suggests nothing should remain hidden and everything should be said, expressed and communicated’. The article suggests that a lack of boundaries in relationships and a lack of silence and solitude can lead to a violation of our ‘inner sanctuary’. Nouwen writes that for all the openness we offer to one another there is however, still a ‘desire for protective boundaries by which man and woman do not have to cling to each other but can move graciously in and out of each other’s circle’. He then asks how we can find the road to conversion, ‘the conversion from loneliness into solitude. Instead of running away from my loneliness and trying to forget or deny it, I have to carefully protect it and turn it into a fruitful solitude’. Nouwen ends the article with a reference to his own struggles with this issue and concludes by stating, ‘The few times however in which I followed the counsel of my severe masters and listen silently to my restless heart I started to sense that in the middle of my sadness there was joy, that in the middle of my fears there was peace, that in the middle of my greediness there was compassion and that indeed in the middle of my irking loneliness I could find the beginnings of a quiet solitude’

Case-recording in pastoral education

This item is a 9 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled ‘Case-Recording in Pastoral Education’ published in The Journal of the Academy of Parish Clergy, by the Academy of Parish Clergy, Minneapolis, Mn., 1974, p. 16 – 24. In this article Nouwen is writing about the value for parish clergy of note-making in their interactions with parishioners. Although Nouwen suggests that such note-making is rarely done he outlines in the article a number of reasons why it is valuable and offers some case-studies as evidence. Nouwen first identifies some reasons why there may be resistance in clergy to undertake note-making: 1) That the interactions are private and privileged, 2) That note-taking is a form of creativity which pastors may not see as being relevant to their work 3) That pastors may not see the relevance of what they do to the development of pastoral theology. Nouwen then discusses some values of note-making for pastors: 1) It is a professional task and one which, if the pastor is to be considered a professional among other professionals, must be done.. ‘The pastor cannot seriously claim a place on the professional team if he does not have his case-record by which he presents his work with the patient for discussion, criticism and evaluation. 2) It is a form of self-supervision. Here Nouwen quotes Russell Dick, BD, that note writing ‘is a check upon one’s work; it is a clarifying and developing process; it relieves emotional strains for the writer.’ Preceding the presentation of several case studies Nouwen states the following, ‘ One of the reasons it is so difficult to learn from experience is that the nature of the experience itself often remains obscure, ambiguous or vague. Sometimes the pastor feels happy after a visit, sometimes disappointed, sometimes sad, angry or depressed. In many ways the pastor senses vaguely that something went right or wrong, but cannot put a finger on it. Usually he does not stop to think or reflect but moves on to another experience allowing his feelings to drift into the background, unavailable as a potential source for learning. But if the pastor sits and writes the conversation as he or she remembers it, and tries to formulate personal observations of the situation and reactions to it, the cloud can vanish and the experience can become clear and visible’.

Stranger in paradise

This item is a 6 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled, ‘Stranger in Paradise’, published in The Sign: National Catholic Magazine, Volume 55, No. 7, April 1976, PP. 13 – 18. It is part one of a two-part article. This article is an excerpt from: Nouwen, Henri: Genesee Diary, Doubleday & Co., 1976. Nouwen begins by stating that ‘My desire to live for seven months in a Trappist monastery, not as a guest but as a monk, did not develop overnight’. The remainder of the article describes some of his struggles and insights as he lived the life of a monk. Nouwen states that he had been looking for someone to help him find direction in his life. He then met Father John Eudes Bamberger at the monastery of Our Lady of Gethsemani in Kentucky in whom he says he found what he had been looking for: ‘He listened to me with care and real interest, but he also spoke with deep conviction and a clear vision…’. Three years later Nouwen went to the Abbey of the Genesee where Bamberger had become Abbot. It is the experience of the seven months in which lived as a monk at this Abbey which is the focus of this article and of the book from which it is taken. Nouwen describes his struggle with the rhythms and work of the monastic life; his struggle understanding monastic concepts of obedience and his own depression that followed his first month. Nouwen then outlines some of the areas in which he feels is learning: 1) Wanting to be different- Nouwen describes his lifelong desire to be thought different and his growing discovery that in the monastery one is to be unnoticed, not special, and in this ‘The mystery of God’s love is that in this sameness, we discover our uniqueness’. 2) Sacred Rhythm – ‘One of the things a monastery like this does for you is give a new rhythm, a sacred rhythm’ and in this, Nouwen rediscovers the Saints. 3) Mary – in the monastery Nouwen rediscovers his devotion to Mary that was part of his family life. 4) Love – In his time in this monastery Nouwen says he struggled with the sense that his experience of love had been ‘limited, imperfect and weak’. Nouwen goes on to say ‘I am beginning to experience that an unconditional, total love of God makes a very articulate, alert and attentive love for the neighbor possible’.

Compassion

This item is a 3 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled Compassion, published in Exchange, Summer 1976, pp. 8 – 10. Nouwen begins this article by saying ‘The word “compassion” always brings to mind a relationship with people…to be with a suffering human being, to suffer with him or her.’ He then asks if it is not possible also to speak about compassion with God which he sees as the basis for our compassion with others. Nouwen sees the dynamic of compassion with God as rooted in Jesus. ‘The great mystery of the spiritual life is that it is a life of union with God. But this union with God is a union through Jesus Christ who suffered all the pains of the world and carried these pains with him into his intimacy with the Father’. Nouwen goes on to say that ‘We cannot carry the pains of our world in our own mind but we can carry [them] in the mind of Jesus Christ’. Nouwen concludes the article by stating ‘Our hearts and minds are too small to carry the burdens of the world but in God’s mind and heart there is room for all that hurts’.

Called to be hosts

This item is a 2 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled: Called to be Hosts, published in Faith/At/Work, September, 1976, p 30-31. Nouwen begins the article by stating ‘The call to ministry is the call to be a host to the many strangers passing by. In this world full of strangers…we search for a hospitable place, where life can be found’. Nouwen speaks then of our ambivalent feelings towards the stranger of both fear and attraction and suggests that ‘during the last years strangers have become more subject to hostility than to hospitality’. Nouwen then goes on to speak of the way in which a minister is to offer healing hospitality to the stranger. He speaks of the need to offer a space where the stranger can grow to be himself. ‘This will come to pass only when ministry is undergirded by spirituality, that is, when the outer movement from hostility to hospitality is supported by an inner movement from property to poverty. Poverty means that my identity in the final analysis is not determined by what I can do or think, but by what God’s Spirit can do, say, and think in me.’ Nouwen concludes, ‘When poverty enables us to create a friendly space for the stranger and to convert hostility into hospitality, then the stranger might be willing to show his real face’.

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