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University of St. Michael's College, John M. Kelly Library, Special Collections Zola Research Programs fonds
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Files: 1578-1683

These files consist of biographical cards for various 19th century journals and correspondents with surnames
About to Coedes. Key correspondents in these files include Edmond About, Paul Alexis, the Aubert family
(Zola’s mother’s family), Saint-Georges de Bouhélier, Alfred Bruneau, Henry Céard, Paul Cézanne, Georges
Charpentier, and Jules Claretie. The journal index cards differ slightly from the biographical cards. The journal cards include information on the beginning and ending of publication, directors (main editors), nature of the
journal, its political orientation, collaborators and its role in Zola’s career.

Files: 111-118

These files consist of photocopies of handwritten correspondence (letters, postcards, cartes de visites and
telegrams) as well as typed/handwritten sent by Émile Zola between January of 1891 and September of 1892.
Recurring correspondents include Henry Céard, Léon Hennique, Jacques van Santen Kolff, Numa Coste,
Edmond de Goncourt, Gabriel Thyébaut and Alfred Bruneau. The letters pertain to both personal and
professional matters. Works discussed in these files include La Bête humaine, L’Argent and La Débâcle. This
period also includes the birth of Zola’s son, Jacques, as can be seen in Zola’s letter to Henry Céard explaining
that he would be away during Jacque’s birth and thus requests that Céard be present at his birth, name his son
and then place an ad in the newspaper to update Zola (letter dated September 8, 1891, in File #113). As well,
Zola’s language with various doctors and Céard implies a need for discretion and secrecy up until 1891, when
Alexandrine Zola finds out about Jeanne Rozerot and the children (as seen in letters to Céard and Jeanne
Rozerot, dated 10 November, 1891, in File #114).

Files: 146-150

These files consist of photocopies and typed transcriptions of letters, postcards, telegrams and cartes de visites
sent by Émile Zola in 1898. Recurring correspondents include Henry Céard, Alexandrine Zola, Fernand Xau,
Alfred Bruneau, Fernand Labori and Jeanne Rozerot. The contents of the letters are both personal and
professional, and span Zola’s involvement in the Dreyfus Affair starting with his article J’Accuse in January of
1898 through his trial and conviction in February and the first half of his exile. These files also include a
touching letter to Jeanne Rozerot, explaining that he must leave for England because of the turn the trial had
taken, dated July 18, 1898 (in File #148). There is a noticeable increase in the number of personal letters
written to family members in these files, due to Zola’s exile (largely Alexandrine Zola, Jeanne Rozerot, Denise
Rozerot and the Laborde family members).

Files: 179-192

These files consist of a variety of photocopies of letters written by Zola, as well as published catalogs
advertising letters written by Zola, with dates from 1843 through to 1902. The first half of the files contain
letters that were obtained from smaller collections (outside of the big collections such as Le Blond-Zola or
Bibliothèque Nationale), and have not consistently been filed with the general files in this series. Most of the
files in this half are accompanied by a typed inventory at the front of the file. Some of the main
correspondents in these files include Henry Céard, Ely Halpérine-Kaminsky, Ernest Vizetelly, the Laborde
family and Jacques van Santen Kolff. The second half of these files contain typed transcriptions of letters,
photocopies of handwritten letters and catalogs advertising letters that were either obtained from the Pierpont
Morgan Library or were included in the Supplement volume of the Émile Zola Correspondance series. These
letters have also not been consistently filed within the general files of the series.

Files: 213-222

These files consist of photocopies of letters sent to Zola between January of 1871 and December of 1879.
These files are primarily composed of photocopies of handwritten letters, although there are a few typed
transcriptions of the letters as well. These files follow the increased popularity and success of Zola’s writing
with the release of L’Assommoir and the creation of a theatre production of Thérèse Raquin, which is likewise
reflected in the increase of fan mail in the later years. The contents of letters between Numa Coste, Louis
Marguery and Georges Charpentier (Zola’s editor) indicate that Zola is becoming increasingly involved in the
social world of literary authors (with names like Henry Céard, Léon Hennique, Guy de Maupassant, Joris-Karl
Huysmans and Louis Edmond Duranty appearing in the contents of the correspondence). Similarly, there is a
clear globalization of Zola’s works as Zola receives correspondence from the United States (discussing
translations) and Georges Charpentier discusses potential German translations.

Files: 237-243

These files consist of photocopies of handwritten letters, cartes de visites, postcards, and some transcriptions
of letters sent to Zola between February of 1887 and July of 1888. There is a clear increase in both the number
of letters sent to Zola in these files, as well as his popularity (particularly in 1887). The files within are divided
into 2-3 month section. The early files are comprised of mostly short notes and cartes de visites, with quite a
few on letterheads from the journal Le Figaro and from the Théâtre de Paris. The later files contain mostly
lengthier letters from friends (recurring correspondents include Marius Roux, Jacques van Santen Kolff, Numa
Coste, Henry Céard and Georges Charpentier) as well as supporters and critics. The increase in the amount of
letters sent to Zola in 1887 could perhaps be attributed both to his increase in popularity (some of his most
ground-breaking books had recently been published), as well as a very critical article published in Le Figaro which targeted both Zola and his most recent novel La Terre. Additionally these files include personal
correspondence and professional papers that discuss the publication of the novel Le Rêve in the journal La
Revue Illustrée.

Files: 305 – 310

These files consist of photocopies of handwritten letters, postcards, cartes de visites, telegrams, newspaper
clippings and handwritten transcriptions of letters sent to Émile Zola between October 1899 and December 1900. The earlier correspondence is largely composed of either discussion around the Dreyfus Affair (the retrial
of Alfred Dreyfus at Rennes, his reconviction and subsequent pardon) or praise for Zola’s Fécondité. A
large portion of these files are correspondence between Ernest Vizetelly, Zola, Macmillan & Co.
representatives and Chatto & Windus regarding Vizetelly’s difficulties in translating Fécondité into a book that
would be deemed both legal and appropriate for the English-speaking audiences in England and the United
States. The later files begin to discuss Zola’s rough draft of Travail (the next novel in his Quatres Évangiles
series), as well as translations and rights of distribution.

Files: 330-362

These files consist of typed and handwritten transcriptions of letters, photocopies of handwritten letters, cartes
de visites and photocopies of some published items (from catalogs like Lettres & Manuscrits Autographes and
Hôtel Drouot) sent to Émile Zola, with dates spanning the 1860s through to 1902. The files within are
organized alphabetically, with recurring correspondents possessing their own files. The original box label
stated that these letters were obtained from “Other Collections,” which refers to smaller collections like
Collection Mitterand and Collection Labodens, as well as from catalogs.

Files: 363-367

These files consist of typed and handwritten transcriptions of letters, photocopies of handwritten letters, cartes
de visites and photocopies of some published items (from catalogs like Lettres & Manuscrits Autographes and
Hôtel Drouot) sent to Émile Zola, with dates spanning the 1860s through to 1902. The files within are
organized alphabetically, with recurring correspondents possessing their own files. The original box label
stated that these letters were obtained from “Other Collections,” which refers to smaller collections like
Collection Mitterand and Collection Labodens, as well as from catalogs.

Files: 368-372

These files consist of photocopies of handwritten and typed letters, postcards, cartes de visites and telegrams
sent to Émile Zola between November of 1897 and January 16, 1898. The letters in these files all pertain to
the Dreyfus Affair, with the early files focusing on the lead-up to Zola’s direct involvement in the Affair. The
later files mostly focus on Zola’s public letter to the President of the Republic, J’Accuse, printed in the
newspaper L’Aurore on January 13, 1898. Some of the letters refer to the Dreyfus Affair through general
discussion of events; however, most demonstrate a clear support or criticism of Zola’s involvement.

Files: 384-387

These files consist of photocopies of handwritten and typed letters, postcards, cartes de visites and telegrams
sent to Émile Zola between February 19 and 28, 1898. The contents of these files are primarily concerned with
the trial of Émile Zola, with correspondents expressing support or criticism for Zola’s involvement in the
Affair and the conviction outcome of the trial.

Files: 391-394

These files consist of photocopies of handwritten and typed letters, postcards, cartes de visites and telegrams
sent to Émile Zola between July of 1898 and September of 1902. The contents of these files are primarily
concerned with providing support to Zola while he is in exile as well as celebrating the reopening of the case in
June 1899 and Zola’s subsequent return to France.

Files: 418-447

These files consist of photocopies of letters written by and amongst Zola’s contemporaries with the surnames
A through L. Although most of the files are indistinct groupings of letters (for example, letters with authors that start with “A”), recurring correspondents possess their own distinct file (for example, File #424 is
dedicated to Alfred Bruneau). The dates of letters in these files range from 1864 to 1936. These files include
three original letters: one letter written by Paul Alexis to Léon Hennique (dated 19 September 1887, in File

420), one letter by Jules Claretie (undated, in File #432), one letter by Maurice Le Blond (1903, in File #445).

Files: 1905-2023

These files consist of biographical cards for correspondents with surnames Nadar to Zola. Key
correspondents in these files include Nadar, Auguste Rodin, Marius Roux, the Solari family, Gabriel Thyébaut,
Gustave Toudouze, Antony Valabrègue, Alexandrine Zola, and Zola’s mother and father (François and Émilie
Zola).

Files: 564-580

These files consist of a variety of documents that pertain to Émile Zola’s life and work. There are four broad
categories in these files:

  1. Miscellaneous: This file (#564) consists of a variety of documents that Zola signed or participated in
    that do not fit with the other categories. Types of documents include Marius Roux’s marriage
    certificate and the birth certificate of his daughter, as well as a photocopy of a document with
    responses from various men to Georges Charpentier regarding dinner at Zola’s (dated June 21, 1893).
  2. Homes: This file (#565) consists of various documents that pertain to Zola’s houses including a
    newspaper from 1995 discussing the sale of Zola’s Medan house to the Émile-Zola Museum, as well as
    a catalogue from the sale of Alexandrine Zola’s furniture after her death in 1925.
  3. Iconography: These files (#566-577) consist of photographs and illustrations on a variety of topics
    including the Dreyfus Affair, pamphlets documenting Zola’s photography hobby, and portraits of
    Zola and his family. Although most of these are photocopies, there are some photographs tracking
    Zola’s vacations/life in England taken during the 1970s, photographs taken in 2000 following one of
    Zola's vacations in the south of France (accompanied by the original Fujifilm roll), as well as an
    original colour newspaper from 1882 (in File #573). There are also 4 negatives of photographs of Zola
    (in File #575).
  4. Inventories: These files (#578-580) consist of an inventory of books dedicated to Émile Zola between
    1897 and 1901.
    Similar to the other boxes in this sub-series, these documents were likely collected to provide context and
    material for the annotations of the published letters.

Files: 581-601

These files consist of photocopies of documents pertaining to Émile Zola’s personal and professional life.
There are six broad categories in these files:

  1. Obituaries: This file (#581) contains various death notices and announcements for Zola, including 16
    original newspaper clippings with dates ranging from 1902-1904. This file also contains some
    documents regarding anniversaries of Zola’s life and death.
  2. Theatre: These files (#582-590) consist of documents relating to theatre productions of Zola’s novels,
    with particular focus on L’Assommoir, Germinal, Les Mystères de Marseille, Nana, Renée and Thérèse Raquin.
    The file on Théâtre Libre contains 5 original pamphlets and 2 booklets about Zola’s theatrical
    productions, dating from 1888-1904.
  3. Zola Today: These files (#591-592) contain photocopies of newspaper clippings and articles that
    document current tensions and issues arising around Zola, with particular focus on the sale of the
    J’Accuse manuscript in 1987.
  4. Zola and the Dreyfus Affair: These files (#593-594) consists of photocopies of handwritten and
    newspaper articles that explore Zola’s participation in the Dreyfus Affair from a non-French
    perspective (many English articles, as well as articles exploring the responses of various other countries
    • Germany and Russia, to name a couple). As well there is a catalog from the Beitler Family
      Foundation that held an exposition for the 100th anniversary of Zola’s involvement in the Affair.
  5. Zola and England: These files (#595-600) contain photocopies of newspaper clippings, articles and
    documents mostly pertaining to the development of the Émile Zola Society in 1990, as well as
    photocopies of handwritten documents donated to the Society by J.C. Burr and Chantal Morel. These
    files also contain photographs documenting the tracking of Zola’s experience in England by the Émile
    Zola Society and Zola’s descendants.
  6. Zola and La Société des gens de lettres: This file (#600) contains a listing of days upon which Zola
    attended meetings between 1891 and 1897.
    Similar to the other boxes in this sub-series, these documents were likely collected to provide context and
    material for the annotations of the published letters. This box in particular also represents some research into
    Zola’s influence in the modern world, the world in which the Zola Research Program was participating and
    adding research and knowledge.

Files: 602-628

These files consist of articles and research materials compiled by and written about the correspondents from
the Letters by Contemporaries series. Types of materials that can be found include photocopies of birth,
marriage and death certificates, some works written by them as well as photocopies of photographs. Key
correspondents in these files include various family members (Alexandrine Zola, Georges Loiseau and Dr.
François Émile-Zola), as well as other professional correspondents (such as Theodore Stanton, Ernest
Vizetelly, Saint-Arroman and Georges Charpentier) and personal correspondents (including Léon Hennique,
Jacques van Santen Kolff, Léona Queyrouze and Dr. Édouard Toudouze).

Files: 874-942

These files consist of photocopies of off-prints, articles and chapters of books that pertain to Émile Zola
and/or Naturalism written by authors with the surnames Nelson to Newton. The dates of publication range
from 1951 to 2004. Joy Newton dominates these files with over 60 articles, however other recurring authors
include Brian Nelson and William Newton.

Files: 1007-1081

These files consist of photocopies of articles, off-prints, and chapters from books that discuss Émile Zola
and/or Naturalism written by authors with surnames Pagès to Peyrot. The dates of publication for material in
these files range from 1858 to 2001. Recurring scholars in these files include Alain Pagès, Allan Pasco, and
Sandy Petrey

Files: 1559-1569

These files consist of a bibliography of works written about Émile Zola between 1864 and 1981. Although
not indicated on the document itself, the original folder identified D. Baguley as the compiler of the
document. Other materials in this fonds indicate that David Baguley was head of a project out of the Western
University (then University of Western Ontario) in the 1970s to compile an international bibliography of all
existing works written about Zola. It is likely that the bibliography included in this sub-series is an updated
version of this project. The document has been divided by year, with distinctions made between types of
publication (book or article). Publications in this document are mostly French and English, however there are
other languages present as well. The years 1896-1899 and 1922-1930 are missing from this document. This
bibliography is also available online and Baguley has continued updating it in recent years (it can be found at http://www.cahiers-naturalistes.com/baguley.htm).

Zola Research Programs fonds

  • CA ON00389 F17
  • Fonds
  • 1873-2008

Fonds consists of documents relating to the Zola Research Program and the publication of the 10 volume "Émile Zola Correspondance" series, including project files, inventories, reference materials, photocopies of Émile Zola’s correspondence and other documents related to the project. The project files contained in this fonds document the development and activities of the Zola Research Program. Project files records include inventories of various letters, funding information, budgetary forms, donor agreements, publicity documents and summaries of the project written both by external entities (newspapers) and internal figures (members of the Program staff). Also included are supplementary documents that were collected to create a broader contextual framework. Each letter is be supported with annotations and background information on the correspondents, events or people discussed in the letters as well as the social and political state of France during the 19th century. While the collection of letters by Zola was the primary mandate of the project, along the way the Program collected a vast number of reference materials to broaden the perspective. This fonds contains the off-prints, various documents (both collected by Zola and collected by the Zola Research Program about various 19th century figures) and bibliographies. Books collected by the Program are now the basis of the Émile Zola Collection in the Rare Book Collection of Kelly Library.

The correspondence is composed mostly of photocopies of handwritten letters, post cards, cartes de visites, telegrams and typed transcriptions of letters. The correspondence is a mixture of professional and personal letters that discuss various matters from the publication of Zola’s main works to the birth of his children. It is clear from the various handwritings and documentation styles that multiple figures were involved in the processing of the letters. However, as a Research Associate and long-term member of the team, Dorothy Speirs was the primary figure creating, processing and cross-referencing the letters. This can be seen through the presence of her initials on most of the documents. Additionally, as Project Archivist Hélène Issayevitch organized the letters and maintained the record-keeping practices throughout. It is important to note that after the dissolution of the Zola Research Program in 1995, Speirs continued collecting reference materials and adding them to the collection. As a result, there are a number of documents contained within that extend outside the dates of the Program. The result of this continued research is an additional publication completed in 2008, in association with Owen Morgan.

This collection remains the largest repository of Émile Zola’s letters available in North America. In recent years, the descendants of Zola have divided the estate, including the letters, resulting in a dispersal of the documents. This collection represents the largest single collection of Zola’s letters that is accessible and open to the public. Additionally, this fonds contains a fountain of information on key figures in the Naturalist Movement of the 19th century, as well as other well-known artists, scholars, intellectuals and political and social figures, including J.K. Huysmans, Edmond de Goncourt, Gustave Flaubert, Édouard Manet, Alfred Bruneau, Paul Alexis, Henry Céard, Léon Hennique, and Guy de Maupassant - all of which can be found either through personal discussions in the letters or supplementary documentation. The hidden value in this fonds lies in the plethora of reference resources that are available. The fonds also houses a vast number of off-prints that explore various aspects of Zola’s life as well as the broader Naturalist community of the 19th century. Some other significant pieces include original 19th century illustrated theatrical pamphlets from the Théâtre Libre, various original newspaper clippings and original letters by Émile Zola, Alexandrine Zola, Paul Alexis and Jules Claretie.

Fonds is arranged into 6 series:

1) Project Files series: consists of a variety of records that document the development of the project over the years, including funding information, publicity and marketing documents, donor agreements, budgetary forms and some correspondence amongst various scholars.

2) Letters by Zola series: consists of photocopies of letters written by Zola between 1856 and 1902. This series also contains an original letter by Émile Zola, dated June 22, 1890 (File #107).

3) Letters to Zola series: contains photocopies of letters written to Zola between 1858 and 1902. This series also contains an original letter by Alexandrine Zola to Émile Zola, dated May 27, 1890 (File #248).

4) Letters by Contemporaries series: consists of photocopies of letters sent between Zola’s family and contemporaries. This series contains an original letter from Paul Alexis to Léon Hennique, dated September 19, 1887 (File #420).

5) Collected and Reference Material series: contains photocopies of documents about the project and the various correspondents in the fonds (documents written by or about Émile Zola, documents about his family and correspondents, off-prints of works written about Émile Zola and naturalism, project inventories of letters and bibliographies). Series contains a variety of original documents including newspapers and theatrical pamphlets.

6) Alphabetical Index Forms series: consists of biographical and contextual information on correspondents of Émile Zola, figures mentioned in the letters, or the main journals for which he wrote.

Zola Research Program

Files: 20-32

These files consist of photocopies of handwritten letters and typed/handwritten transcriptions of letters
written by Émile Zola between January of 1856 and December of 1870. The letters contained within are both
personal and professional; Zola writes to his friends regarding his life in Paris and his burgeoning writing
career. Meanwhile, these files also contain letters from his job at Hachette Publishing as well as letters sent to
various editors and reviewers regarding his early works including Contes à Ninon, La Confession de Claude, and
Thérèse Raquin. Some recurring correspondents include Georges Charpentier, Philippe Solari, Paul Cézanne,
Edmond de Goncourt, Géry Legrand, Marius Roux and Antony Valabrègue.

Files: 80-89

These files consist of photocopies of letters, postcards and cartes de visites and typed/handwritten
transcriptions of correspondence sent by Émile Zola between January of 1885 and December of 1886.
Recurring correspondents include Antoine Guillemet, Alphonse Daudet, Ernst Kiegler, Henry Céard,
Edmond de Goncourt, Georges Charpentier, Jacques van Santen Kolff and various family members (Amélie
Laborde, Lina Laborde, etc.). The contents of the box are both personal and professional in nature as can be
seen through the various social gatherings mentioned in the letters, as well as professional discussion of the
publication and translation of the following works: La Joie de Vivre, Germinal, L'Œuvre and early talks about La
Terre.

Files: 136-145

These files consist of photocopies and typed transcriptions of letters, postcards, telegrams and cartes de visites
sent by Émile Zola between January of 1896 and December of 1897. Recurring correspondents include Henry
Céard, Alexandrine Zola, Alfred Bruneau, Jeanne Rozerot, Gabriel Thyébaut, and Ernest Vizetelly. The
contents of the letters are both personal and professional. Many of the letters sent to editors, publishers and
translators are regarding Rome and Paris. As well, these files cover the months leading up to Zola’s direct
involvement with the Dreyfus Affair. Discussion of the Dreyfus Affair becomes more prevalent in November
of 1897 (particularly when Zola writes to Alexandrine) and demonstrates Zola’s increasing involvement and
anger (as seen in letter to Alexandrine Zola, dated November 19, 1897, in File #144)

Files: 156-162

These files consist of photocopies of handwritten correspondence and typed/handwritten transcriptions sent
by Émile Zola between January of 1900 and June of 1901. Recurring correspondents include Fernand Labori,
Denise Rozerot, Alfred Bruneau, Fernand Desmoulin, Ernest Vizetelly and Joseph Reinach. Zola kept in close
contact with many of the figures involved in the Dreyfus Affair (as can be seen in the number of letters sent to
Fernand Labori, Alfred Dreyfus and others); however, a large portion of his correspondence is focused on
business after 1900. Most of the letters focus on Travail, however there are numerous references to articles and
critiques being written by Zola at this time

Files: 223-228

Files consist of photocopies handwritten letters, telegrams and cartes de visites written to Zola between the
years of January of 1880 and December of 1882. These letters are comprised of both personal correspondence
(letters from Zola’s godson, Paul Charpentier) and professional correspondence (people requesting
authorization to write various translations of Zola’s works). It is interesting to follow the progression of some
of Zola’s works throughout the time period in these letters (for example, Céard writing to Zola on January 13,
1880 about the editing on an upcoming compilation book titled Les Soirées à Médan between Zola, Henry
Céard, Léon Hennique, Joris-Karl Huysmans, Paul Alexis and Guy de Maupassant and then the incoming
letters from fans once the book is released in April of 1880). These files contain numerous fan mail letters
regarding various articles written in journals and books published during this period (including Pot-Bouille), as
well as requests from editors to write in their journals.

Files: 229-236

These files consist of photocopies of letters, cartes de visites telegrams and postcards written to Zola between
January of 1883 and January of 1887. Recurring correspondents include Georges Charpentier, Antoine
Guillemet, Numa Coste and the Manets. The early contents of the letters discuss Zola’s political and
philosophical battle concerning his naturalist literary style. There are multiple letters within these files that
indicate that Zola was considering multiple English journals when releasing the serial version of Germinal;
within these letters, we can see evidence of the concern on the part of the English for the moral and ethical
contents of Zola’s novels (see letter from Tilloston & Son, dated October 9, 1884, in File #232). Other works
mentioned in the letters include La Terre, L’Œuvre and L’Assommoir. File #235 contains the last letter between
Paul Cézanne and Zola in this collection (marking the end of their friendship) following the publication of
L’Œuvre, a work that was interpreted to be based upon the unsuccessful career of Cézanne (letter is dated
April 4, 1886).

Files: 244-249

These files consist of photocopies of handwritten letters, postcards, cartes de visites, telegrams and some typed
transcriptions of letters sent to Émile Zola between August of 1888 and December of 1890. Georges
Charpentier, Gabriel Thyébaut and Eugène Fasquelle are some of the recurring correspondents in these files.
File #246 includes an invitation sent to Zola in preparation of the birth of Fasquelle’s daughter, followed by a
letter the next day informing Zola of her birth (letters dated respectively November 10 and November 11,
1889). Most of the contents of these files are professional correspondence and fan mail regarding Zola’s
novels Le Rêve, La Bête humaine and L’Argent (pre-published interest). In particular, there is an ongoing
conversation of letters from Eliza E. Chase regarding the rights to the English translation of Le Rêve - these
letters follow the progression from the early stages of discussion through the negotiation and the eventual
agreement (this conversation encompasses both this box and the previous box). There is also an original letter
from Alexandrine Zola to Émile Zola, dated May 27, 1890 (in File #248).

Files: 280-285

These files consist of photocopies of handwritten letters, postcards, cartes de visites and telegrams as well as
typed and handwritten transcriptions of letters sent to Émile Zola from January of 1897 to January of 1898.
The contents of these files are divided between discussion around Rome and Paris, and rumblings about Zola’s
increasing involvement in the Dreyfus Affair, culminating with the publication of J’Accuse on January 13, 1898.
As a result, the later files of 1897 contain letters from various newspapers and journals (both in Europe and
the United States) requesting Zola’s opinion on the current social and political situation in France (the Dreyfus
Affair was becoming a massive issue), some of which directly mention the Dreyfus Affair. Additionally, these
files also contain correspondence from the first two weeks after Zola published J’Accuse. As well, the final file
of 1897 (File #283) contains correspondence that discusses the death of Alphonse Daudet. There are a large
number of Letters of Contemporaries in these files, both professional (sent from Ernest Vizetelly) and
personal (sent from Alexandrine Zola), which have presumably been placed here because the contents pertain
directly to Zola’s affairs.

Files: 286-291

These files consist of correspondence sent to Émile Zola between February and May of 1898. Files are
divided in half months due to the large number of correspondence sent during this period. This time period
marks Zola’s political alignment with Alfred Dreyfus throughout the Dreyfus Affair; the correspondence
within reflects this increase in political publicity. For the most part, these files consist of photocopies of
handwritten letters and telegrams sent to Zola, although there are also some postcards and cartes de visites, as
well as handwritten and typed transcriptions of correspondence. Some correspondence discusses Zola’s works,
mostly Paris, but also his future endeavors (as evidenced in letters from publishers across Europe and
America). Later in February and March, there are quite a few letters expressing both support and condolence
for Zola regarding the negative verdict in his trial. As well, there is an increase in the number of Letters of
Contemporaries included here, as more people write to Alexandrine Zola about her husband. These files also
contain the first instance of correspondence (that is included in this collection) from the Dreyfus family (dated
February 24, 1898, in File #287).

Files: 311-318

These files consist of photocopies of handwritten and typed letters, postcards, cartes de visites, telegrams and
typed and handwritten transcriptions of letters sent to Émile Zola between November of 1900 and December
of 1901. Recurring correspondents throughout these files include Alexandrine Zola, Ernest Vizetelly, Chatto
& Windus Publishers, the Loiseau family (Elina, née Laborde, and her husband Georges) and Antoine
Guillemet. For the most part, the correspondence within discusses both personal and professional matters,
including the death of Paul Alexis in July of 1901, as well as praise and requests for rights for Travail. Multiple
close family friends also comment on Zola’s hobby for photography. File #318 also contains the first
communication (in this series) between Alexandrine Zola and Denise Rozerot (Émile Zola’s daughter with
Jeanne Rozerot) in a postcard dated February 7, 1902.

Files: 373-377

These files consist of photocopies of handwritten and typed letters, postcards, cartes de visites and telegrams
sent to Émile Zola between January 17 and February 3, 1898. Most of the letters in these files discuss Zola’s
letter J’Accuse and indicate either support or criticism for his political alignments. Included in these files are multiples Letters of Contemporaries addressed to Alexandrine Zola, but they are likely included because they
discuss either the state of France during the Dreyfus Affair or Émile Zola’s involvement.

Files: 378-383

These files consist of photocopies of handwritten and typed letters, postcards, cartes de visites and telegrams
sent to Émile Zola between February 4 and 18, 1898. The contents of these files are primarily concerned with
the trial of Émile Zola (particularly between February 7 and 18), with correspondents expressing support or
criticism for Zola’s involvement in the Affair

Files: 406-412

These files consist of photocopies of handwritten and typed letter, postcards, cartes de visites, telegrams and
some photocopies of newspaper clippings sent to Émile Zola in April of 1898 through to December of 1899.
The period largely consists of Zola’s exile to England and his subsequent return to France in 1899. These files
were obtained from a distinct accession of Dreyfus Affair material from July and August of 1991.

Files: 1802-1904

These files consist of biographical cards for correspondents with surnames Henriques to Murger. Key
correspondents in these files include Joris-Karl Huysmans, the Laborde family (Amélie, Albert, Elina),
Édouard Manet, Louis Margery, Guy de Maupassant and Octave Mirbeau.

Files: 743-801

These files consist of photocopies of off-prints, articles and chapters from books that relate to Émile Zola or
Naturalism written by authors with the surnames Iwabuchi to Mitterand. The dates of publication range from
1897 to 2001. Recurring scholars include Gian-Carlo Menichelli, Elise Michel and Henri Mitterand. There are
also multiple booklets written in Japanese in these files.

Files: 802-873

These files consist of photocopies of off-prints, articles and chapters from books that discuss Émile Zola
and/or Naturalism written by authors with the surname Mitterand to Nardi. The dates of publication range
from [1894] to 2001. Recurring authors include Henri Mitterand and Owen Morgan.

Files: 1280-1351

These files consist of off-prints, articles and chapters from books that pertain to Émile Zola and/or
Naturalism written by authors with surnames Sederberg to Symons. The publication dates for works contained
in these files range from 1891 to 1997. Recurring authors include Masakazu Shimizu, Dolorès Signori,
Dorothy Speirs and Halini Suwala. Most of the works in these files are written in French or English, however
Shimizu’s works are written in Japanese. File #1291 contains an original article by Severine, published in 1898
and titled "Notes d’une frondeuse - Liste de suspects."

Files: 497-509

These files consist of photocopies of a variety of documents written and/or owned by Émile Zola or that
pertain to his business affairs between 1863 and 1903. There are four broad categories of documents included
in these files:

  1. Articles, Declarations, Speeches, Interviews: These files consist of photocopies of a variety of
    documents created by Zola throughout his career, including articles for journals, speeches and
    declarations he wrote and/or made, as well as copies of interviews with various people.
  2. Contracts and Financial Documents: This file consists of various legal documents belonging to Zola,
    including contracts for his works and financial documents
  3. Dedications, Introductions, Prefaces: These files consist of photocopies of works written by Zola for
    the purpose of dedications, introductions or prefaces to others’ works.
  4. Handwritten Manuscripts: These files consist of photocopies of notes on his various works as well as
    notes that Zola wrote about various hobbies, including photography. There are four original pieces in these files: the first is an original article handwritten by Saint-Georges de
    Bouhélier titled Une entrevue avec Émile Zola (dated 1894, found in File #497) and three newspapers from
    L’Aurore, (all dated 1900, found in File #498).

Files: 1544-1558

These files consist of inventories created by the Zola Research Program between the years of 1975 and 1991.
The inventories are a mixture of handwritten and typed, with various additions and annotations present. In
particular, the inventories documenting the Collection Le Blond Zola have very interesting ways of organizing
letters sent to Zola based on various information including author, content of letter or reference of Zola’s
work and country from which the letter was sent. These inventories are documenting the early years of the
program, as they developed more advanced systems of record keeping later on. As a result, most of the
inventories in these files were created in 1975 and 1976. There are also an extensive number of inventories in
the second half of the box that were used for cross-checking between the two teams. These inventories were
divided into years by the Zola Research Program staff, and a letter between Hélène Issayevitch and Collette
Morin-Laborde dates them to 1991. There is also an inventory of Letters by Contemporaries sent amongst
Zola’s family members (corresponds with letters in Boxes 54 and 55), which have been arranged by
correspondent.

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