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Student activities

Personal correspondence with friends and University officials, brochures, flyers, pamphlets, and reports relating to courses in Caribbean studies created and collected during Mr. Pieters undergraduate years (B.A. Political Science, 1993) at New College. Also included is a file on New College Alumni Association containing copies of reports, etc relating to the provostial review of the college, 1996. This series also includes photos documenting his activities as a student including social events, meetings, dinners and his graduation.

Research files (general)

This series consists of the general files that Mr. Grenville assembled in his attempt to write Dr. Solandt’s story. It begins with a variety of biographical information on Dr. Solandt, including curriculum vitae, tributes and obituaries, his memorial service, press clippings, and an article about him. This is followed by grant applications, a project outline, correspondence, and files on sources, family history, and Dr. Solandt’s activities (including summaries of diaries), arranged alphabetically. The principal areas of activity covered are the atomic bomb/nuclear weapons, Canadian National Railway, Defence Research Board, forestry, medical research, operational research, the Science Council of Canada, and ‘voyaguers’. The photographs associated with some of the files have been removed and stored separately.

Biographical and personal

This series contains passports, daily agendas (58 volumes) and an address book, as well as files relating to the Banff School of Fine Arts, Professor Peers’ academic life, awards that he received and books that he wrote. Also included are a class photograph of the East Coulee School where Peers taught and was principal from 1939-1942, personal correspondence, photographs of Peers with friends, travel documents and records relating to his 90th birthday and the memorial service held upon his death. The series concludes with a file of records relating to David Rayside, a U of T professor and close friend of Peers.

The “biographical information” file [/003(04)] contains, amongst many other items, several pieces that Professor Peers himself penned between 1980 and 2002 about his family and background and his years as a high school teacher. Included with this is a CD from one of his nieces, Bev Swanton, titled “Acadia Valley Homecoming 2012”, that celebrates the hamlet, the surrounding farms (including that of the Peers family) and includes the centennial parade.

Personal/biographical

This series contains material relating to Prof. York’s life. It includes a curriculum vitae from 1998 and a copy of the U of T National Report on Derek York and his work with laser probe argon-argon dating.

Personal and family

This series consists of files documenting Professor Friedland’s personal and family activities. It begins with a number of files documenting Friedland’s activities as a student and professor of law at the University of Toronto, his post-retirement professional and other activities. There follow files relating to members of his family, arranged by name, which focus broadly on family affairs and more specifically on personal lives, including professional and social activities, achievements, births, weddings and deaths. These are followed by other files containing correspondence sent home from England, Europe and Israel, and relating to the Friedland residences on Hillsdale Avenue and Belsize Drive.

The files contain correspondence, appointment books, certificates, curriculum vitae, greeting cards, honours, notes, notices, legal documents such as passports and wills, medical reports, programmes, postcards, photographs, and press clippings (including obituaries).

Personal and biographical

This series contains copies of Professor Flynn’s curriculum vitae and some correspondence, both personal and professional and including letters of reference, and examination questions for his undergraduate work in Arts at the University of Toronto in the early 1940s. Included are three photographs and a satirical drawing of his receiving his doctorate from the Sorbonne.

Harold Keith Box

Personal records of Dr. Harold Keith Box including correspondence, lecture and research notes relating to his career in dentistry and as research professor in peridontology in the Faculty of Dentistry.

Lectures and conferences

Series consists of posters for lectures and conferences hosted by university offices, departments, faculties, and student/alumni groups. Topics in include science, astronomy, politics, archaeology, medicine, literature, history, philosophy, theatre, theology, law, current events, and higher education. See item listing for more details.

National Research Council

Series contains is composed of records dating from McKay’s time at the National Research Council. During the Second World War, the organization was mobilized to support the Allied war effort. As a result, most of the series’ records relate to military research and development. Canadian Army Operational Research Group (C.A.O.R.G.) reports compose approximately half the files that make up the series. These reports cover subjects ranging from blast measurements for anti-tank mine clearance to the number and distribution of Japanese paper balloons in North America. There are also two summary reports on Japanese balloon incidents.
The remainder of the textual and graphic records are made up of committee minutes, general Department of Defence documents, and a short paper on Canada’s part in the development of the radio proximity fuse, which McKay contributed to as assistant to project leader Professor Arnold Pitt.

Also included in this series are the remains of a Japanese paper balloon. Paper balloons, also known as balloon bombs, were a by-product of an atmospheric experiment by Axis scientists, which discovered a powerful air current traveling across the Pacific at about 30,000 feet [1]. Taking advantage of this knowledge, the Japanese military developed what may well have been the first intercontinental weapon in the form of explosive devices attached to paper balloons. These balloons were released in Japan and carried along the Pacific by a jet stream, ultimately finding their way to North America’s West Coast. Although the Japanese are thought to have released as many as 9,000 paper balloons, only 1,000 or so are thought to have reached North America, resulting in a total of six casualties [2].

NOTES

  1. Johnna Rizzo, “Japan’s secret WWII weapon: Balloon bombs,” National Geographic, 27 May 2013.
  2. Ibid.

General correspondence

This series is made up of general correspondence files, arranged alphabetically by the name of the correspondent or by the name of the person about whom Prof. McNeill is corresponding. Incoming and outgoing correspondence cover such areas as research, supervision of graduate students, editing of papers, trips, as well as numerous letters of reference for past students and colleagues seeking recommendations for appointments, tenure, awards and grants. Some correspondence relates to consultancy work such as files on the Ministry of the Solicitor General, Advanced Medical Systems, Inc., and Scintrex Ltd.. There is extensive correspondence with colleagues in Australia regarding his involvement in the development of a body compositional laboratory at Prince Henry Hospital in Melbourne.

The files often contain attached documentation to the correspondence. This is most often the case when corresponding with or about students under his supervision. Files may include drafts of thesis, research reports and Ph.D. oral assessments.

Personal files

This series contains biographical sketches compiled for internal University of Toronto purposes and for several biographical dictionaries (ca. 1960-1992), including a selection of photographs; a personal data file compiled by Professor Glass in July, 1986; certificates and diplomas for academic and honorary degrees and other awards (1947-1986); and press clippings (1977-1985).

Early biographical information

The records in this series provide biographical information on Marion Walker’s early life, 1921-1942. Series includes 7 photographs. Subjects are: 5 portraits of Marion Walker; the Phi Beta sorority, 1940; and the University College graduating class, 1942. Also included is a scrapbook of newspaper clippings concerning Ms. Walker’s amateur golfing activities, 1937-1941.

Personal files

This series contains material documenting the personal side of Dr. Hastings’ life. It begins with genealogical and biographical information about and articles regarding Hastings and his family, followed by copies of his curriculum vitae (1961-1994). Other items include his baby book (1928), membership cards and memorabilia, and miscellaneous writings. There is a file of badges and certificates from the Royal Life Saving Society and files on awards and honours, in particular from the Pan American Health Organization, the University of Toronto alumni, and the Canadian Public Health Association. There are several files on trips, beginning when Hastings was a teenager, and on the deaths of his parents.

The larger part of this series consists of daybooks documenting Dr. Hastings’ activities between 1955 and 1967. These take the form of quarterly volumes, a few of which are missing. There are also a number of casual and formal photographs of Dr. Hastings and slides of his father’s funeral. The arrangement of the daybooks and the photographs is chronological.

An electronic version of Dr. Hastings' CV is attached (in pdf)

Personal and biographical

Series consists of textual records and graphic material documenting Ian Hacking’s personal life and career, with eight files related to the histories of both the Hacking and MacDougall families. Records include a passport, birth and marriage certificates, family snapshots, drawings by his children, as well as correspondence detailing financial contributions made to various charities and initiatives. Ian Hacking’s professional and academic activity is reflected in written and photographic documentation of awards and honours received, including the Killam Prize for the Humanities, the Companion to the Order of Canada, and the Holberg International Memorial Prize. Also included in the series is an autobiographical document written by Dr. Hacking detailing the orientation of his research.

Personal and biographical

The biographical information in this series is provided largely by several versions of Frederic Urban’s curriculum vitae. The other files contain a notebook (1975-1977) primarily on life in Boston and Halifax, a wall calendar (1981), greeting cards from his partner, Larry Richards, and others, design elements for a garden at Urban and Richards’ penthouse in Etobicoke, and material from a trip to Columbia at Christmas, 1976. Accompanying this textual material are two files of slides, one of “Danny, Halifax”, and the other “Studies for Natchitoches”, Urban and Richards’ property in Louisiana.

Professor Urban has always had a great interest in history, American politics and the presidency; the passion for politics he shared with his partner, Larry. In the late 1960s they both took part in demonstrations on the Boston Common against the Vietnam War; a poster by the Vietnam Moratorium Committee is a memento of that struggle. Another from that era is a special issue of Life (5 July 1968) on the Presidency.

Textual records and photographs

This series contains course notes, correspondence, addresses, articles, manuscripts, notes, minutes, and photographs relating to the activities of Thom Greenfield as a professor of educational administration at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education and as a gay activist, especially in relation to "Gay Fathers of Toronto", of which he was one of the founders.

Biographical and personal records

The series consists of biographical and personal records of Professor Bay. The material reflects his personal life, and includes press clippings, articles, and a thesis about him; personal documents such as educational records; documents of identification; personal papers related to life events (baptism, marriage, home ownership, inheritance, death certificates); calendars and a condolence scrapbook.

The arrangement of the material begins with biographical information (press clippings, biographies, curriculum vitae, referees, work about Bay), then personal papers, followed by what he termed “his personal collection”, consisting of items primarily in Norwegian relating to his family and Norway generally. The most intriguing portion of this “collection” is the folders of “illegal papers” [/002(28) – (30)] that Professor Bay buried when he hurriedly left Norway early in World War II and which he dug up sometime after he returned. There are also books about Norwegian resistance, and two books by his uncle.

Personal

The series consists of records documenting Gilbert Edward Jackson’s family life and professional career, from the early 1920s to his death in 1959. Arranged alphabetically by function, the files of the series include: typed autobiographical notes illustrating Mr. Jackson’s life from the day he was born until 1919, prior to his emigration to Toronto; two biographical sketches highlighting key moments within Mr. Jackson’s personal and professional career; typed and handwritten incoming and outgoing correspondence from family members, friends, colleagues and acquaintances regarding the death of his son, John Denison Jackson (1944), Mrs. Maria Elizabeth Jackson’s estate (1952-1953), notes of thanks for reference letters, gifts and lunch meetings, personal regards for his family, and an unsigned letter to Misses Jackson, Mr. Jackson’s sisters regarding the economist’s declining health (1959); a handwritten copy of Mr. Jackson’s obituary (1959); and a photograph of a portrait of Mr. Jackson (B2004-0019/001P). Within the files of correspondence, the letters are arranged chronologically, except for those offering condolences to Mr. Jackson for the loss of his son which are arranged alphabetically by the last-name of the sender.

The series also consists of several files of press clippings about Mr. Jackson’s personal life, career moves, thoughts, views, as well as Canada’s economic stance on various issues. The subject matter of the newspaper clippings include: France and Germany’s economic situation after World War I; Canada’s immigration policies (1923), tariff fallacies and taxation system (ca. 1935); unemployment insurance within Canada; the analogous trading problems with England (1934); Mr. Jackson’s speech on overcoming the depression and difficulties through the improvement of the human character before the Empire Club in the Royal York Hotel (1933) and Canadian Club in Ottawa (1934); being appointed Economic Adviser to the Governors of the Bank of England (1935); the selling of Mr. Jackson’s house in Toronto prior to leaving for England (1935); the return of economic liberalism to Canada; the doctrine of free trade; and reviews about Mr. Jackson’s book An economist’s confession of faith (1935). Letters to the editor can also be found within the press clippings regarding similar themes. Arranged chronologically within their individual files, the press clippings, which are from newspapers across Canada and England, were possibly collected by Mr. Jackson.

Biographical and personal

This series contains files with Joan Winearls' curriculum vitae and other information on professional activities, followed by several files of professional correspondence, including commentary on specific manuscripts. There are also files on her employment at the University of Toronto and her applications for research leave, on the Historical Atlas of Canada project, and relating to her consultative position with the Legislative Library of Ontario in 1983. The series concludes with several files on honours and awards bestowed on her.

Education and personal activities

The series documents Allan Irving’s activities as a doctoral candidates at the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Social Work, between 1976 and 1983 : his application and registration; the fellowship he received from the department of National Health and Welfare of Canada; lecturer position at the Faculty for Professor Albert Rose; doctoral seminars he attended, papers he prepared during his graduates years and academic results. The series also documents his membership with historical associations such as the Ontario Historical Society and the University of Tennessee’s Social Welfare History Group. The series documents Allan Irving’s applications for teaching positions in Canadian universities, from 1982 to 1994 ; his nomination for the Ontario Confederation of University Faculty Association’s Teaching Award in 1994, nomination prepared by Marion Bogo, associate professor and acting dean of the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Social Work, and Mary Lee. This series also partially documents Irving’s friendship with professors and/or colleagues.

The series consists of 37 files including application for fellowship and report on his doctoral work at the intention of the department of National Health and Welfare of Canada ; statements of academic records ; library card; seminar notes; working notes, bibliographies, drafts and final version of papers (some annotated) ; curriculum vitae ; letters of support ; personal correspondence and press clippings. The series also includes one photograph of Allan Irving with James Gripton’s son, Stuart, at the age of 6 in Calgary (Alberta) ; one photograph of Ernie Lightman’s daughter, Naomi.

Correspondence and committees

Alphabetically arranged files contain correspondence with individuals and groups and give a good overview of Etkin’s professional activities and relationships. Included are files with colleagues at many Canadian and American universities as well as with representatives of the aviation industry including Boeing, DeHavilland and Royal Aircraft Establishment. This series also contains correspondence and related documents for various committees and professional associations such a committee of NATO called AGARD (Advisory Group for Aerospace Research), the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, the Association of Professional Engineers and the Canadian Aeronautical Space Institute. There is documentation on Etkin’s time as chair of the Aeronautics Advisory Board of Transport Canada. Some files relate to professional trips or visits including Etkin’s trip to China in 1982 and the Chinese subsequent visit to IAS.

Also found in this series is correspondence with Ph.D. students and colleagues within the University of Toronto such as G.N. Patterson, Israel Glass, J.B. French, James Gotlieb and many more.

Correspondence

This series contains professional and personal correspondence covering the years 1952-1990. Topics covered include administrative matters in the Department of Slavic Studies, issues relating more widely to slavic studies, and Professor Luckyj's writings, including correspondence with publishers. Interspersed with this correspondence are drafts of book reviews, articles, and memorials; notes, press clippings, and photoprints. Many of the letters are written in Ukrainian, and there are a few also in Russian and French.

Photographs

Series contains photographs collected, maintained, and/or accumulated by Kathleen Parlow. Includes the following sub-series: individual photographs; negatives; albums; gifted photos.

Writings and publication drafts

Series consists of W. E. Gallie’s writings, manuscripts and reports that eventually went to publication. The series consists of both typed and handwritten reports, drafts, some correspondence related to copying and publishing, and in some cases, medical photographs or images have been attached as figures. A bibliography of many of Gallie’s works is included. Some of the publications in this series are co-authored by Gallie and Dr.’s Robertson, LeMesurier, and Janes. The files in this series have been arranged in chronological order. The titles for the files in this series reflect the given title of each report, if one exists.

Personal and education

This series consists of records such as her curriculum vitae, her association with the Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing, personal documents such as register of birth, certificates and diplomas relating to her nursing education at the University of Toronto, and her association as an elder with St. Andrews Presbyterian Church, Owen Sound. Records relating to her education also include her personal scrapbook of photographs, clippings, correspondence and other documents recording her years as a student of nursing in the diploma programme at the University of Toronto. This series also contains a file relating to her Honorary Doctorate in Nursing Science from the University of Turku in Finland in 1993.

In addition to photographs in the scrapbook, portrait photographs of Prof. Jones as a graduate in nursing in 1950, as Dean (ca 1979-1988) and informal photographs of the honorary degree ceremony at University of Turku will be found in /001P.

Correspondence

This extensive series contains both personal and professional correspondence received by Prof Berger during his academic career. Some of Prof. Berger’s draft replies will be found in later files. The earliest letters document his doctoral education and his appointment to the Department of History at the University of Toronto. Correspondence from the 1970s through the 1990s document his flourishing career as prominent historian, author, teacher and advisor, etc. Later correspondence is dominated by requests from editors and other scholars relating to his publications, requests for review of other manuscripts, as well as his history of the Royal Society (1996)

Correspondents include, among others, prominent academics such as Prof. Ray MacLean, Dept. of History, St. Francis Xavier University (b 1927 d. 2004), Prof. Ramsay Cook, George (now Sir George) S. Bain, a former classmate at the University of Manitoba and member of Board of Bombardier Aerospace, as well as former students such as Doug Owram (professor, University of Alberta 1976-2006), and colleagues at Canadian and foreign universities. Subjects include personal information about family, friends and colleagues, academic correspondence with students and other academics about research progress, requests for letters of reference and support, comments on recent publications, and other academic activities. Two files at the end of this series contain letters to single correspondents: M. Brook Taylor (1986-2006) former student and faculty member in Department of History, Mount St.Vincent University and Sam Waller, amateur historian and founder of the Sam Waller Museum in The Pas, Manitoba.

Biographical

This series gives researchers a good overview of Prof. Hume’s career and highlights. It includes biographical sketches, C.V., clippings, awards and correspondence regarding his various appointments. Photographs of Prof. Hume and relating to his career have also been placed in this series including portraits, a photo of Prof. Hume at a 1969 IFIP meeting and early computer installations in the Computer Centre. Finally, there is one framed painting of the Sanford Fleming building that hung in his office.

Manuscripts

Series consists of draft manuscripts and typescripts of more than 150 books and articles, forewords and introductions, sermons, and talks by Henri Nouwen. The date range of the materials is from 1956 to 1996. The series contains drafts of 49 of his articles and drafts of 41 books (Nouwen published over 300 articles and 39 books in his lifetime). In addition to handwritten drafts or typescripts some files may also include loose notes (usually background reading notes), galley and print proofs, administrative papers, correspondence regarding the materials, and photographs and artwork used in the process of publication.

The materials in the Series reflect Nouwen’s general writing process: for the most part he hand-wrote his works on foolscap or in hard-back journals, often he created reading notes pertaining to the subject he was writing on, drafts were typed by an administrative assistant and then circulated to friends and other readers for comment. He saved all of the drafts, often incorporating the notes made by himself and other readers, in order to create one final work.

Common themes present in the drafts include: spirituality, love, God, psychology, theology, relationships, prayer, ministry, and Christian life. Nouwen often reflected on his own spiritual journey and experiences in his works in journal form. This writing was often deeply personal and it is for this reason that some of the manuscripts and drafts are restricted from use, including Man at the Watershed, A Spiritual Journey, Taken, Blessed, Broken, Given (parts of which were published in Life of the Beloved), The Inner Voice of Love, Adam, and Sabbatical Journey.

With exception of the sermons, most material has been published. Eight transcripts have been identified as unpublished, including a book on Anton T. Boisen based on Nouwen’s doctoral thesis, a draft of a work about Nouwen’s friend Richard Alan White, and notes for a book Nouwen began in 1991 regarding the trapeze and the spiritual life as well as some of the restricted material listed above. See file descriptions for more information on each work.

The series has been arranged into two sub-series:

    1. Books and articles
    1. Talks and sermons

Each of these sub-series has sub-sub-series, files, and items. They have been arranged chronologically.

Papers of Father John O'Connor

Series consists of a collection of hand-written and typed manuscripts, poems, translations and radio transcripts created and accumulated by Monsignor John O'Connor, as well as his correspondence, collected ephemera (including news clippings, Christmas cards, posters, pamphlets, and small press publications) and research notes. The majority of the material relates to O'Connor's friendship with the author G.K. Chesterton, although O'Connor also translated Latin religious poetry and composed his own verse and wrote prose pieces on literature, Church history, morality, religion and philosophy.

Personal

Davidson Black kept a diary throughout much of his adult life. There are 28 volumes in this series. The earliest is for 1902, the year he entered medicine at the University of Toronto; it includes a tally of monthly expenses. The last diary is for 1934, the final entry being for 9 March, six days before his death. For each of the years 1922 and 1925, there are two volumes of diaries. There are no diaries present for the years 1907, 1908, 1909, 1911, and 1912. The diary Davidson kept while on active service during World War I is filed with his service records in Series 4. Most of the entries are brief as the diaries, except for 1902, are small. Some of the loose entries with the diaries are longer.

A number of items document his personal activities. The earliest is a small well-thumbed copy of 'The Book of Common Prayer', presented to him by his mother on his 9th birthday in 1893. A notebook, a journal, and permits document his early interest in ornithology. Finally, there are files of memorabilia, poems and sketches, and on honours bestowed on him later in life, along with twelve diplomas and certificates.

Biographical and personal files

This series is divided into two sections. The first contains biographical sketches and curriculum vitae, press clippings and articles about Dr. Solandt, along with photocopies of his birth certificate and copies of his will and that of his first wife, Elizabeth. There is correspondence with Elizabeth regarding their marriage, with relatives and friends, and relating to appointments. Also present is a cash book detailing personal expenses between 1923 and 1946, a diary of Dr. Solandt’s first trip to Europe in 1929.

The first portion of this series concludes with the programme for the Solandt Symposium on Organizing and Managing the Practical Application of Science to Problems in Peace and War (Queen’s University at Kingston, 1994), programs for dinners of the Royal Canadian Engineers 3rd Field Engineer Regiment and the Royal Canadian Signals 11th Signal Regiment, a presentation copy of Donald Y. Solandt’s Highways to Health, and a resolution by Donald M. Solandt (Omond and Donald’s father) to the Presbyterian Synod of Manitoba in 1915.

The second section of this series consists of diaries and daybooks (largely the latter), beginning with an account of Dr. Solandt’s trip to Europe in the summer of 1929 while he was an undergraduate at the University of Toronto. Dr. Solandt kept only the occasional diary, of which three are represented in this series. The first is for May, 1945 as the war ended in Europe. The last two both cover his trip to Japan in October-December, 1945 to study the effects of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These diaries are followed by "CDRB's U.K. Visit" (undated); an account book of Solandt's visit to the United Kingdom in November, 1966, and his American address book.

The remainder of the volumes in this series are daybooks and “pocket diaries”, of which Dr. Solandt created a large number. In the former, usually with the manufacturer’s label of as “diary” or “date book”, he recorded his appointments and, occasionally, his expenses and other related notations. These date from 1941, when he first went to Lulworth, to 1988. The volumes for 1945, 1947,1948, 1957, 1958, 1979, and 1986 are absent, either because they were never kept or, perhaps, were not written up in the same manner. For 1945, for instance, there are entries for January, June, and July in two different volumes, but none for the whole year. For two years (1956; 1971, where the second volume has "Mayo Muir" below Dr. Solandt's name and the entries are not in his hand) there are two volumes.

The "pocket diaries" complement the appointment books. The earliest year represented is 1945, the latest, 1988. There are no volumes for 1948-1951, 1953, 1957, and 1959-1965. For 1958, there are also two volumes containing notes on Dr. Solandt's European trip in March and appointments for another in July, and "at a glance" volumes both for 1958 and 1959.

For accounts of travel experiences, either for pleasure or work, see Series 11: Canoe trips and Series 13: Travel.

Frank Buck

The series contains material related to Frank Buck the animal hunter, movie actor, producer, director and author. Material consists of ads, movie stills, books (primarily in comic book style), and trading cards.

Academic activity files

This series contains documents pulled together by Prof. Armatage for her tenure review as well as for subsequent yearly reviews. Files contain mainly professional correspondence, descriptive reports on research and teaching activities, yearly activity reports and clippings about her work. There is information on promotions, awards, research leaves and grants. Clippings in this series also give evidence to Prof. Armatage’s work outside mainstream academia including her role as a documentary filmmaker and curator for the Toronto International Film Festival.

Menus

The series comprises menus from around the world featuring a variety of cuisines including Afghan, American Argentinian, Armenian, Asian, Bangladeshi, Brazilian, Burmese, Cambodian, Caribbean, Chinese (Peking, Szechuan, Shanghai, Yunnan, Mandarin, Cantonese, Hunan and Jiangnan), Colombian, Cuban, Dutch, Ecuadorian, Egyptian, European, Filipino, Finnish, French, Hong Kong style, Indian, Indochinese, Indonesian, Islamic, Israeli, Italian, Jamaican, Japanese, Korean, Laotian, Latin American, Lebanese, Malaysian, Mediterranean, Mexican, Middle Eastern, Mongolian, Moroccan, Mughlai, Nepalese, Pakistani, Pan-Asian, Peruvian, Russian, Scandinavian, Singaporean, Southwestern, Spanish, Taiwanese, Thai, Tibetan, Turkish, Venezuelan, Vietnamese, seafood and vegetarian.

Menus are from restaurants located in Kenya, Morocco, South Africa, China (Beijing, Hangzhou and Shanghai), Egypt, Guam, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Israel, Japan, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, Tibet, Turkey, Vietnam, Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, England, Finland, France, Germany, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Malta, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Scotland, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Wales, Antigua and Barbuda, the Bahamas, Bermuda, Canada (British Columbia, Manitoba, Newfoundland and Labrador, Northwest Territories, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Quebec, Saskatchewan and Yukon Territory), Costa Rica, Cuba, Curaçao, El Salvador, Greenland, Guatemala, Mexico, Panama, the United States (Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming), Australia, New Caledonia (France) New Zealand, Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Peru and Venezuela.

Menus types included placemat menus, single sheet menus, trifold and four fold, five fold and seven fold menus and menus in booklet style. Some menus are laminated while others are in vinyl enclosures. Menus range from take away and delivery to eat in and include wine lists as well.

Menus from hotels, cruises and airlines are also included in this series.

The series is divided into 6 subseries: Africa, Asia, Europe, North America, Oceania and South America. The division is based on the 7-continent model, substituting Australia as a continent and replacing it with Oceania for greater geographical coverage.

Personal files

This small series contains Dr. Glass' curriculum vitae, entries for biographical dictionaries, press clippings and articles; appointment calendars for 1974 and 1976; files from his employment as a stress analysts at Canadair (1945) and in 1947 as an aeronautical engineer with the Canadian Car and Foundry; and a file containing an offer of a position at Technion, the Israel Institute of Technology (1971-1972).

Elgin Rowland Hastings

This series is comprised almost wholly of material assembled by Elgin Hastings while a student in the then new five-year Bachelor of Medicine program at the University of Toronto between 1908 and 1913. The records consist primarily of a comprehensive collection of course notes, laboratory notes and drawings. Hastings kept detailed notes, dated his notebooks and many of the lectures and exercises, and often recorded the name of the professor or tutor teaching the course. He also preserved a list of all the courses for which he had registered at the beginning of each academic year and the professors who taught them. He did, however, take some additional courses that were not listed; one example is a course in psychiatry taught by Ernest Jones during the Easter term 1912. The course notes are arranged by academic year and alphabetically by name of course within each year.

The series also contains certificates relating to Hastings’ medical education and professional certification, a student handbook, memorabilia of his extra-curricular activities, photographs of some of his classmates, photographs including family members and the graduating Class of 1913 (Medicine), and a transcript of the evidence given in a court case in 1914 (two pages of Hastings’ evidence have been torn out).

Correspondence and biographical

Consists of correspondence with colleagues, publishers, and his wife. Also includes a framed letter from Duncan Campbell Scott, 2 annotated books, educational diplomas and certificates, memoirs, scrapbooks, graduation robes, and various medals.

Incoming correspondence

Series consists of Fred T. Flahiff's personal correspondence, deposited with the library due to its relevance to Flahiff's work on Sheila Watson. Includes 53 letters from Sheila Watson, 3 letters and 34 pages of poetry and 20 illustrations in ink and pastel (17 of which are photocopied) from Wilfred Watson. Also includes letters from others: one letter from B.J. Mitchell; one letter from a Mike (last name unknown), regarding an entry on Sheila Watson in the UBC yearbook "Totem" from 1931; one letter from Douglas M. Gibson, publisher at McClelland and Stewart.

Personal

These boxes contain personal materials relating to my early years, my undergraduate years, various correspondence from and to family members and others, materials relating to the immediate family, files involving homes and other property that we owned, my income tax returns, other financial matters, and assorted other files.

There is relatively little material relating to my early years, including my high school years (files 3 and 4). I saved very little of that material. Similarly there is very little with respect to my University undergraduate years (files 5-16). There are no files relating to courses in Commerce and Finance (file 7). There are a few scattered things involving the university fraternity, the University College Literary and Athletic Society (UC “Lit”), U of T athletics, Hart House, and the Historical Club (files 6-13). A few postcards and letters and newspapers relate to the World University Service (WUS) trip to West Africa in the summer of 1955 and the many trips thumbing through the states while an undergraduate and law student (files 14 and 15). Material relating to my time at law school is contained in the “Law School” sub-series in Series 4.

I have included correspondence and other documents involving our children and the immediate family (files 17-27) and letters received from Judy’s and my folks while we were in Israel (files 28-30). Letters relating to our times in Cambridge are found in the boxes on Double Jeopardy and Law Reform (Series 5).

There are files relating to the purchase and sale of 169 Hillsdale, our first house, and the purchase and rentals while away of 77 Belsize Drive, our second house (files 31-38). There is also a file on the purchase and sale of property in Barrie, Ontario (file 39). I have not included at this time the material that I have on the purchase from Dean WPM Kennedy’s son, Frere, in 1983 of the Kennedy property in Kearney, Ontario, where our summer place is.

I have included a file relating to the estates of Ben and Sarah Garfield, Judy’s uncle and aunt, of which I was an executor (file 48). There are also other financial matters in the files, particularly my income tax returns for the years 1963-1992 (files 50 and 52-57).

Other miscellaneous files include records of the Public Lending Rights scheme (file 41), a Cambridge Boat Race Dinner speech that I gave in 1990 (file 42), some correspondence with Jewish groups (file 43), and various who’s who entries (file 40).

Biographical

This series gives a good overview of Prof. Prentice’s career. It includes biographies, C.V.s, correspondence on appointments, newspaper clippings, honours received and photographs.

Correspondence

Prof. Heichelheim maintained a regular correspondence with friends, family and colleagues both in Canada and around the world up to the year of his death. His brother’s name was Arthur Heichelheim and he lived in London England. This series dominates this fonds and includes correspondence with classical scholars at Cambridge and Oxford and at the University of Giessen (Prof. Heichelheim’s former employer), as well as at the University of Toronto. Such scholars include many of his co-authors such as E.N. Adler, Prof. F. L. Griffith, J. G. Tait, T. Frank, H. Michel, Prof. Elemer Balogh and Prof. Cedric Yeo. Correspondence is in English or German, depending on the nationality of the correspondent.

During World War II he continued to maintain ongoing correspondence with his brother and other family members, along with other scholars left in Europe and frequently describe living conditions, lost friends, the death camps and establishment of a Jewish state in Palestine. Correspondence with family and friends is often in German.

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