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University of Toronto Archives and Records Management Services Subseries
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Later advisory work

Records relating to post 1992 work that Prof. Cameron did with the Ontario Government, providing advice on constitutional matters throughout the 1990s, and then with the Panel on the Future of Government in Ontario (2002-2004). Prof. Cameron (with Graham White and Celine Mulhern) produced Democracy in Ontario, a report for the Panel on the Future Role of Government in Ontario, in August 2003.

Industry Canada

Records relating to work for Industry Canada on the market value of cellular telephony, personal communications services (PCS) and enhanced specialized mobile radio licenses (ESMR).

Friedrich Engels and Marxian Political Economy

Friedrich Engels and Marxian Political Economy (2011) was derived out of Hollanders extensive research for his 2008 text The Economics of Karl Marx. The book looks at Engels’ earlier contributions to Marx’s economic analysis, and provides background into how Marx developed his theories.

The sub-series includes notes and correspondence related to the work as well as two full annotated drafts of the book. The sub-series also contains annotated chapters of The Economics of Karl Marx which were adapted for use in Friedrich Engels and Marxian Political Economy

Progress without planning: the economic history of Ontario from Confederation to the Second World War (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1987)

B1995-0013/013: Chapters 1 to 14: drafts and correspondence, 1981-1986
B1995-0013/014: Chapters 15 to 19; appendices, figures. Drafts and correspondence, 1980-1985
B1995-0013/015: Final drafts of manuscript with editor's marks and comments of D.G. Paterson, ca 1987. See also correspondence regarding this publication in Box /007(06-07)

Hydro case

In 1985-1986 Wilson provided advice on the financial impact of Ontario Hydro’s plans for Southwestern Ontario, as submitted for environmental assessment. In 1990-1991, Wilson provided advice on the impact of the current federal sales tax system on Ontario Hydro’s input costs

Lipski

In the Spring of 1981, I started looking for a project that would build on my interest in Mr. Justice James Fitzjames Stephen, who had played a prominent role in the article on criminal codes that I had completed on my sabbatical in 1979-80. I knew that Stephen had been involved in a number of interesting murder cases, such as the Maybrick case. I started to play around with a plot, perhaps a fictional one, that would involve Stephen, the Maybrick murder case, and Stephen’s son, J.K. Stephen, who may have been Jack the Ripper. In the course of this speculative investigation I came across the Lipski case. (See file 10.)

I had earlier seen brief references to the Lipski case that Stephen had tried in 1887, but did not know much about it except for the fact that Lipski was a Polish Jew and was hanged for murder. I looked through the London Times microfilm of the case that took place over the summer of 1887. The case was a fascinating one and I wrote to England to see if there were records on the case. They had records and even though they were closed for 100 years they would make them available for me. I was going over to England that summer to give a paper at the Cambridge Lectures and made arrangements to view the documents at the Home Office (file 2). The papers were very extensive (files 88-93) and there was also a transcript of the two-day trial (files 94 & 95). I arranged to have the documents copied and sent to me in Canada.

I quickly concluded that the case was an excellent one to explore the frailty of the criminal process and various other issues that interested me, such as Jewish immigration to England. It would also enable me to show the danger of capital punishment. One of the files I have included in this collection contains notes that I made in the 1960s on the issue of capital punishment (file 3).

There were, of course, many documents in other libraries and archives (file 4). The Cambridge Library, for example, contained the Stephen papers -- papers that I had used in the R. S. Wright article -- which included letters that Stephen had sent to his wife in the country during the trial and which showed what was going through his mind during the trial and in the later fight for a reprieve.

John Atkinson, a law student, was my research assistant that summer and did excellent work in helping me find material putting the case in the social and economic context of the times. He also helped me the following summer in Canada as well as in London where he spent a month in various libraries (See file 8.). (John died from cancer shortly after graduating from Law School. I gave the eulogy at his funeral. It has not been easy sorting through the file containing his notes.) Another excellent research assistant was Stephen Perry, who had just graduated from the Law School and had returned to Oxford to complete his doctorate in jurisprudence. (He is now
teaching at the University of Pennsylvania Law School.)He visited various archives for me in England in the fall of 1981 (file 9).

There was extensive correspondence with a large number of persons who had expertise in the various subjects covered in the manuscript (files 5 to 7). Some were experts on immigration to England, some on life in the East End of London, some on W. T. Stead, the journalist, who played a prominent role in the case, some on locked-door murder mysteries, and many others topics.

I have kept only a small part--perhaps about 10%--of my research files dealing with the case. Most had been culled earlier. Those kept include a number of spiral binders which show, to some extent, the chronological development of my ideas (files 10-13) and various specific files that may be of particular interest to future researchers. These include research on Jack the Ripper, locked-door mysteries, Rabbi Simeon Singer, W. T. Stead, and immigration matters (files 14-24).

There is no complete hand-written draft of the manuscript. It seems that I had my secretary type short hand-written sections after I had completed them. Some of these early drafts that I did keep are contained in various files in the collection (files 1, 25, 26, and 30).

In early drafts I gave away in the opening the fact that Lipski was hanged (see file 1). In later drafts, however, I decided that because virtually no one knew the Lipski case, I would keep back from the reader the fact that he was hanged, although I would state at the outset that he was convicted. The drama in the case would therefore turn on the issue of whether there would be a reprieve.

The book went through various typed and word-processed drafts (files 27-29, 53-56). The endnotes were done after the text was completed (files 30-38). There is considerable correspondence relating to pictures that were used in the book and for the slides that I later used in the various talks that I gave (files 57-60).

Macmillan London agreed to publish the book in December 1982 and a contract was concluded in 1983 (files 39-46). A number of other publishers had turned it down (file 50). Box 3 contains the various matters pertaining to publication such as author’s publicity sheets and catalogues. I was particularly pleased to have Macmillan London publish the book because they were Stephen’s publishers a hundred years earlier. Subsequently arrangements were made to have Macmillan Canada distribute the book in Canada at a reasonable price (file 48). The American rights were finally sold to Beaufort Books (file 49). No paperback edition was brought out (file 47). In 1995 copyright in the book reverted to the author (file 46).

A selection from the book appeared in the Canadian lawyer and in 1995 it was given the Crime Writers of Canada Award for Non-fiction for 1984 and was short-listed for the English Crime Writer’s Dagger Award for Non-fiction (files 51 and 52). I gave many talks with slides on the book, and did a number of radio interviews (Peter Gzowski and Vikki Gabereau, etc.) (See files 72 & 73.)

The book was widely reviewed in England, Canada, and the United States (files 65-69). The files contain extensive correspondence after publication (files 62-64), including correspondence with some of the reviewers (file 70) and correspondence with respect to the W. T. Stead Society.

There are a large number of files in box 45 dealing with possible movies. An Australian company, the principal of which was the murdered women’s granddaughter, took an option on the book and came fairly close to getting the financing for a movie (files 75-84). It had some of the leading character actors in England, such as John Mills and Leo McKern, lined up to play roles in the movie (file 83). A number of Canadian directors and producers, such as Pat Ferns and Beryl Fox, took an interest in the project, but nothing concrete developed. An American company also took an interest in the book, but again, nothing came of it (file 85). As I state later with respect to my other murder books, I’m still hoping!

Other peace work and resources

Subseries consists of general records and resources related to peace, including papers, background materials, and news articles. Subseries also includes a file on the 1962 Ann Arbor Conference on Arms Control, the first of a series of conferences related to arms control and disarmament sponsored by the Centre for Conflict Resolution at the University of Michigan, held under the guidance of Kenneth Boulding. This conference, which brought together pacifist scholars and military and defence analysts, was very influential in shaping the various approaches of peace research and disarmament activities. The file includes conference summaries, lists of participants and Dr. Franklin’s notes.

The Economics of Karl Marx: Analysis and Application

The Economics of Karl Marx: Analysis and Application (2008) is Hollander’s 6th text on the classical economists. The book is an assessment of Marx's Capital and other writings, and addresses Marx’s thoughts on the transformation and the surplus-value doctrine, the reproduction schemes, the falling real-wage and profit rates, and the trade cycle. The book attempts to present criticisms that Marx would have encountered during the time of his writing.

This sub-series includes rough notes taken by Hollander on Marx and his reviewers, reference lists, drafts of chapters, and correspondence related to the book and its publication.

Chemical and biological warfare

Subseries consists of records documenting Dr. Franklin’s concerns around chemical and biological warfare/weapons (CBW), as a scientist, a Quaker, and a member of VOW. Subseries includes background material on issues relating to the making, testing and use of chemical poisoning.

According to Dr. Franklin, both Voice of Women and some members of the scientific community were interested in clarifying Canada’s role in this area of research and development, including the role of universities. These groups were also active in public education to achieve a complete banning of research, production, testing and use of such weapons. There are several recurring issues: one is Canada’s official role in the research and testing of chemical weapons, particularly the use, on behalf of her allies, of the test station in Suffield, Alberta. Voice of Women in particular made many attempts to question the use of this large tract of land for testing highly poisonous agents. The Canadian government always responded that their work has been entirely defensive, i.e. the testing of protective clothing for soldiers who might be subjected to chemical attacks. The Canadian government has never attempted to suggest that it could protect civilians or that in fact protection was possible. The storage of small amounts of toxic gases on the grounds of Suffield was never denied, however subsequent inquiries showed that the military found it impossible to actually track down the existing location of their supplies.

Records in this subseries include background material from public sources, as well as unclassified Suffield documents. One of the strong forces in the Canadian scientific community who tried to expose research activities in Canadian universities has been Dr. Arthur Forrer of York University’s Department of Biology. He did much to assess the published papers of staff members from Suffield to ascertain their professional expertise so as to deduce the area of their classified activities.

See also: Relevant tapes can be found in Series 18 (Sound recordings), including the visit of VOW members to Suffield; an interview of Ester McCantiless by Dr. Franklin regarding work at the Suffield military base and recruitment of her students; an interview with chief of the Defence Research Board and Muriel Duckworth and Ursula Franklin; and Dr. Franklin’s recorded thoughts to Ann Gertler re the failure of the Chemical, Biological Warfare Control Workshop.

Discount rate case

Brief records relating to the Subcommittee of the Civil Rules Committee on the Discount Rate and Other Matters, in the Court of Appeal for Ontario.

The Economics of Thomas Robert Malthus

The Economics of Thomas Robert Malthus (1997) is another of Hollander’s books in his continued study of the classical economists and like its predecessors, especially Ricardo, is poised to set off debate. Economist A.M.C. Waterman, in his article “Reappraisal of ‘Malthus the Economist’, 1933-97” (History of Political Economy 30:2 1998 pp 293-334) in which he reviews important literature surrounding Malthus, writes:

It is quite possible that scholars of the twenty-first century will come to regard Hollander on Malthus as the most important book in the history of economic analysis since Schumpeter 1954… And like most other books Hollander has so far produced, his latest will get its fair share of controversy and disagreement.

Included are various generations of drafts as well as early research and papers on Malthus.

R.S. Wright Articles

My sabbatical in 1979-80 was to be devoted to the process of law reform. While in Israel in the fall working on codification of the criminal law, I became interested in R.S. Wright and his Jamaica Code. I couldn’t discover very much about it. I wanted to add it as a footnote to what I was writing. Professor Yoram Schachar, then at the Hebrew University, urged me to go to the Public Record Office in London, where he had done work (file 4) and where I had never been. When I got to England at the end of December 1979 I went to the PRO at Kew Gardens. I spent most of the remaining part of the sabbatical working on the RS Wright story comparing his code with that of James Fitzjames Stephen (files 2-12). In the end, rather than one footnote, it had 324 footnotes (file 12). It was the first time that I told a story and I enjoyed the archival work so much that it led naturally to my later murder books.

The article, “R.S. Wright’s Model Criminal Code--a Forgotten Chapter in the History of the Criminal Law,” was published in the new Oxford Journal of Legal Studies (file 12). It is my favourite article by far. I gave a talk on it--‘Old and New Criminal Codes’--at the University of Windsor and at other law Schools (files 14 and 16). The Windsor talk was published in the Law Society of Upper Canada Gazette (file 15). In 1990, I gave a talk at the Washington meeting of the Society for the Reform of the Criminal Law on Codification in the Commonwealth, based on the Wright story, which was published in the Criminal Law Forum (files 17-19).

Phases

Ontario Government Records on Constitutional Renewal records relate to a variety of meetings and groups (including those in other subseries) that were kept by Prof. Cameron, typically in chronological order (ex. one file per month) or by project phases. These files include minutes, draft reports, briefing books, correspondence, and other records.

Research and teaching files

Comments on and revisions to manuscripts, book reviews, essay topics and reading lists for courses, subject correspondence files, microfilm copies (3 reels, 35mm.) of manuscripts in the PRO (“Reflections on the Roman Commonwealth) – [manuscript attributed to Locke but identical w. Walter Moyle’s Essay Upon the Roman Clth.], the Bodleian Library (Locke Ms e, “Treatise on the Civil Magistrate [autumn 1660]), and the Library of Union Theological Seminary, New York (McAlpin Collection: 1. Overton: An Arrow; 2. Lilburne: Rash Oaths; 3. To the supreme authority.)

Coronary Primary Prevention Trial (CPPT) and other studies

Series consists of five files related to the Coronary Primary Prevention Trial (CPPT). The trial tested whether lowering plasma cholesterol would prevent fatal and non-fatal heart attacks. The clinical trial was conducted at the Toronto McMaster Lipid Research Centre as well as eleven other US centres. Series also includes a proposal for a second analysis for nutrient intake. Records include notes, summaries of results, speaking notes from a 1984 press conference, and commentary of published CPPT findings and data tape documentation.

Population (Prevalence) Studies

Series contains records documenting research performed as part of the Toronto McMaster Lipid Research Clinics Population (Prevalence) Studies. Comprised of a number of individual studies, the project analyzed data from more than 8,200 subjects from both Hamilton and Toronto over two visits. Material within the series includes progress reports from the initial visits in addition to representing specific component studies. Component studies included in the sub-series are morbidity and mortality follow-up studies, high-density lipoproteins triglyceride (HDL-TG) risk factor analysis, and the Toronto Hamilton Comparison Study. Records includes data, notes, correspondence, typescripts and tables.

APO C-II deficiency research

Series contains material documenting specific studies and general research within the Studies of Familial Apolipoprotein CII Deficiency project. Initiated in 1977, the project aimed to study family members with apolipoprotein C-II deficiencies in order to establish the clinical and genetic characteristics of the condition. Lead investigators were Diane Wilson Cox, Carl Breckenridge, and Alick Little. The project also included collaborative studies with external researchers. Included in the material are records related to the APO CII Deficient Pedigree Study and the Apoloprotein CII deficiency: An investigation of abnormalities of Lipids and Lipoproteins and the Anemia of Homozygotes project as well as documentation of field trips to the United States (Texas. Records include proposals, correspondence with patients, fellow researchers and doctors, patient records, data print-outs, family study questionnaires, lab results, and reports.

Ontario Arts Council

Prof. Schabas has been involved with the Ontario Arts Council since the mid 1960's when he was commissioned to write a report on "Ontario Community Orchestras" (1966) which became a blueprint for developing 40 professional and amateur orchestras in Ontario. This series of correspondence, minutes, notes, and reports documents these activities. Included are records on the OAC's Advisory Committee on Touring which resulted in the report "Touring in Ontario" with David Silcox, William Wylie, and Reva Gerstein and led to the formation of the Council's Touring Office; and a copy of "Choral Music in Ontario" with Keith Bissell, which led to the formation of the Ontario Choral Federation, Ontario Youth Choir and annual province-wide 'Choirs in Contact'.

Negotiating freer trade: the United Kingdom, the United States, Canada and the trade agreements of 1938.(Waterloo, Ont.: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 1989). Written with Norman Hillmer

Early manuscripts of this book were prepared under the title "A shaft of Baltic pine: negotiating the anglo-american-Canadian Trade agreements of 1938." Included in this subseries are an annotated paper presented to the 61st Annual meeting of the CHA (1982); manuscript version originally submitted to the Social Science Federation of Canada for subsidy (Sept. 1985); drafts of various chapters, research notes, and correspondence with Wilfrid Laurier University Press.

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