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Department of Fine Art

Between 1957 and 1985, Marion Walker was a professor in the history of stage and costume design in the Department of Fine Art and its Graduate Centre for the Study of Drama. In this capacity, she taught Stage Design (FAS 333Y) and 18th Century Stage Design (FAS 435). She also assisted in the staging of the Graduate Centre for the Study of Drama’s 1974 productions of Marsh Hay and T’is a Pity She’s a Whore.

The records in this series document Ms. Walker’s teaching and research activities in the Department of Fine Art. The textual records mainly consist of subject files containing research and lectures notes. Topics covered include: correspondence, Baroque theatre, Ferdinando Bibiena, Comedia dell’ Arte, Elizabethan theatre, Fratelli Galliari, Greek theatre, Filippo Juvarra, Renaissance theatre, opera, research grants and Wagner’s The Ring. Also included is a scrapbook commemorating Ms. Walker’s retirement from the Department in 1985.

This series also consists of approximately 130 slides used to teach the History of Stage and 18th Century Stage Design. Subjects include the stage designs of Marsh Hay, Ferdinando Bibiena, Filippo Juvarra, Fratelli Gallieri and Pietro Gonzaga.

Also included are 10 stage plans created by Ms. Walker for the Graduate Centre for the Study of Drama’s 1974 productions of Marsh Hay and T’is a Pity She’s a Whore.

The series also contains one scrapbook of costume designs for the Graduate Centre for the Study of Drama’s production of Fuente Ovejuna (The Sheep Well), [n.d.].

Photographs

University of Toronto. Senior Hockey Team. Practice. 1949-1950.
(l. to r.) N.D. Fox, T.C. Turcott, W.R. Moore

Photographs

Portrait of Kay Riddell and images of gatherings and events of the International Student Centre and its predecessor Friendly Relations with Overseas Students. Pen sketch of the International Student Centre House.

Conferences and exhibitions

This series documents the conferences on map librarianship in which Ms Winearls participated, exhibitions she prepared, and publications arising from them. It begins with several files containing correspondence and research notes on cartography and the early lithography of maps in Canada that Ms Winearls compiled between 1973 and 1998, and many of her applications to attend the conferences. Then follow the conferences and exhibits, the arrangement for which is generally alphabetical, beginning with the Association of Canadian Map Librarians 1993 workshop on the cataloguing rare maps.

Next is a file on the formative years (1975-1978) of the Canadian Cartographic Association and its History of Cartography Interest Group. This group drew on the formation three years earlier of a working group on the history of cartography within the International Cartographic Association. Ms Winerals was the co-ordinator of the cartobibliography section of the ICA, which organized the 11th International Conference on the History of Cartography in Ottawa in 1985. The files on this conference contain correspondence, notes, programs, and the papers presented by some of the participants. Also included are files on the Working Group on Cartobibliography’s proposal to

publish as a manual Coolie Verner’s manuscript on carto-bibliography. There also files on the ICHC conferences in 1987, 1989, and 1991. This part of the series ends with a file from 1992 for a project on cataloguing maps. All of these files are in B1998-0012, boxes 012 and 013, files 01-04.

In 1984, in conjunction with the sesquicentennial celebrations of the City of Toronto, Ms Winerals was invited to be a guest curator for an exhibit at the Canadiana Gallery of the Royal Ontario Museum, “Mapping Toronto’s first century, 1787-1884.” The files [B1998-0013/013(05) – (13), /014(01) – (02)], trace the development of the exhibition and include drafts of the catalogue and photographs. There is also a diary [B1996-0021/003(05)] that she kept while planning the exhibition.

Ms Winearls began attending meeting of the Conference on Editorial Problems in 1991 as convenor of its 29th annual conference in 1993 that coincided with the publication of The Historical Atlas of Canada. The title of the conference was “Editing early and historical atlases”. In conjunction with the conference she mounted an exhibition, “The atlas as a book”, in the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library. She also edited a volume of selected conference papers that was published by the University of Toronto Press in 1995. Most of the files are in B1998-0013 but there is one in B2007-0015.

The Conference files contain minutes, correspondence, grant applications, editing notes, drafts of the papers published, and reviews. The exhibition files contain background notes, research files for each exhibition case, collations, and drafts of the catalogue.

Finally, Ms Winearls curated an exhibit in the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library called “Art on the Wing” in 1999. Records includes notes on cases, drafts and final copy of the catalogue as well her lecture. The Conference files contain minutes, correspondence, grant applications, editing notes, drafts of the papers published, and reviews. The exhibition files contain background notes, research files for each exhibition case, collations, and drafts of the catalog.

Research

Professor Flinn’s academic research centred on bourgeoise literature in the Middle Ages, particularly in France, and the iconography of the Roman de Renart, Renard the fox, and related works in medieval Europe. It led to one book, Le Roman de Renart dans la littérature française et dans les literatures étrangères au Moyen Age and a number of articles and addresses. His research continued into retirement and over the years he corresponded with a number of fellow enthusiasts, especially Tobias Hagtingius in the Netherlands and Kenneth Varty at the University of Glasgow.

The files contain notes, original material sent by colleagues, correspondence relating to Professor Flinn’s research interests and partial drafts of some writing projects. Some relate to his book, others to the iconography of the Roman de Renart, and still others to a ‘Reynard the Fox in Europe’ project proposed by Erwin Verzandvoort of the Netherlands in the late 1980s, which apparently came to naught. It is not possible, for the most part, to relate these files directly to a single publication, except for a few files relating to Professor Flinn’s book; these can be found in the next series.

The arrangement of the files follows Professor Flinn’s quite closely, with the description of each file (except for the “Renart’ prefix to each, done by the arranger) being, very largely, what he provided.

Included are photoprints, film strips, photonegatives, slides and postcards from sources in Europe and Britain; these are often referred to in the correspondence or in Professor Flinn’s notes. The images in B2009-0038/002P have been left in the envelopes provided by Professor Flinn, with his notations thereon; the descriptions of the other photos are taken from his notations. For an accompanying file of notes, see B2009-0038/005(18). The arrangement has been left in the order he created.

Diplomas and certificates

This series contains diplomas and certificates, including all honorary degrees and all earned degrees. For some there are related correspondence, programs, invitations, and photoprints.

Files of correspondence, citations, programs and photoprints associated with the diplomas and certificates are interspersed with them. Some diplomas and certificates are not present, but any surviving material associated with them is filed.

Graphic material

Consists of graphic material, including photographs of Gill and some taken by him and photographs and postcards of European locations, art and architecture.

Research files

This series contains mainly correspondence, manuscripts, drafts and notes relating to some of the many research papers, reports and proposals that were published or presented by Etkin over a 40 year span. To list only a few, papers document his work in: wind engineering, flight dynamics, satellite stability, flight in turbulent winds, supersonic wing design, wind tunnel design and aerodynamic particle separator design.

Of particular note are files relating to his research on the spin decay of the Alouette I Satellite and his subsequent design modifications for Alouette II. Etkin identified the deceleration of the early Alouette I satellite as one of the most interesting science and engineering problems that he was faced with throughout his career. Scientific papers presenting his findings can be found in this series while records relating to grants to design a modification for Alouette II are found in Series 5 – Grants.

A second file to note, documents the role he and his IAS colleagues played in the safe return of the Apollo 13 mission. Identified by Etkin as the most dramatic event in his career, the story is preserved here in correspondence, notes, clippings and a photo. Etkin’s discussion of the event can be found in a recent talk to the Engineering Alumni Association found in Series 2 - Lectures, Talks and Seminars (B2004-0017/005(42).

Finally Etkin’s comments on peer publications, referee reports and reviews for several journals can also be found in this series along with files relating to his time as one of the editors of Progress in Aerospace Science.

Photographs

Portraits of Professor Macallum; copies of illuminated address presented to Professor Macallum on 9 March 1906 by undergraduates in the Faculty of Medicine, on the occasion of his election to the Royal Society of Canada. Taken by Steffens-Colmer, Vancouver; C.T. Blackburne; Freeland, Toronto; Lafayette, Glasgow; McCaul's Pond, c. 1880. Also includes photo of McCaul's Pond, ca. 1880.

Professional Activities: University of Toronto

In the three years before Dr. Hastings was hired full-time at the University of Toronto in 1956, he combined a donship at South House, Burwash Hall, Victoria College with teaching courses in the Department of Public Health Administration, where he was employed as a fellow in medical care administration without salary (he did have two fellowships). He made enduring friendships from his stint as a don and the relative freedom he was given allowed him, as has been shown in the last series, to travel to India and Japan with the World University Service (further files on his travels with WUS are found in Series 5). In July of 1954 he embarked on a trip to western Canada to gain first-hand experience of the integration of medical care administration with the administration of a provincial health department. He worked in the Medical Services Division of the Department of Health in Saskatchewan until the end of August. Then, for three weeks, he was on the train, first to the West Coast, stopping en route to consult with medical officials in Alberta and British Columbia, and then returning to Toronto.

This first section of this series documents Dr. Hastings’ history of employment at the University, his activities in his early years, some of his teaching experience, and various ceremonial occasions. It begins with detailed files on Dr. Hastings’ two years (1953-1955) as a residence don, including correspondence, notes on residence discipline and items about student life generally. Next are the notebooks, diaries and letters documenting his trip across Canada. These are followed by a file [box 023, file 13] with correspondence and course material relating to his activities as a fellow in public health and preventive medicine and by files documenting the history of his employment at the University of Toronto. Next come the few files of lecture material (ca. 1953-1961, 1981-1982) in this accession, including documentation on a thesis supervised (1989-1991). This portion of the series concludes with files on ceremonies at the University and at York University between 1957 and 1965, including the installation of two chancellors and of Claude Bissell as president, and a file on the honorary doctorate bestowed on Hafldan Mahler in 1990.

The remainder of the files in this series is arranged from the broader University activities to the more specific; they document in detail Dr. Hastings’ role in planning and policy making. The first section contains files [box 025/(01)-(02)] on activities of the Governing Council relating to a sub-committee of its Planning and Resources Committee, of which Hastings was a member, and to the School of Hygiene. They are followed by presidential and presidential advisory committees and task forces on the future of the School of Hygiene (1972); gerontology, which Hastings chaired (1976-1977); the future of health care in Ontario (1991), and health services (1993); provostial reviews of the faculty of medicine (1986-1987 and 1992); and the Decanal Community Health Review task force (1987-1988). This section concludes with a study tour of Lithuanian health care facilities in 1995.

The second section, beginning with box 025, file 11, documents the activities of the Faculty of Medicine, primarily in its relationship to the School of Hygiene and community health programs at the University of Toronto. Included are such activities and events as the 60th anniversary of the School of Hygiene (1988); the Task Force on Professional Masters Programs in Community Health (1975-1977) and the Interfaculty Committee of Heath Science Deans on Outreach Project (1978-1979), both of which Hastings chaired; the Community Health Review and Planning Task Force (1978-1979); the faculty’s external review of the Division of Community Health (1978-1980) and its Decanal Community Health Review Task Force (1987-1988), of which Hastings was a member and which is thoroughly documented [see box 027].

The files relating to activities of the School of Hygiene from the 1950s to the 1970s [box 028], include its comparative study on the health care delivery systems in Sault Ste. Marie and St. Catharines; Dr. Hastings had a deep and long-term interest in the Sault project. Later Dr. Hastings was a member of the advisory committee on the history of the School of Hygiene, Within Reach of Everyone; there are files relating to the second volume. There are also files on the anniversary symposium of the School (1973) and undergraduate students’ reaction to the Hastings report of 1972 (see also Series 7).

Next are a few files documenting Dr. Hastings involvement with the Department of Health Administration, primarily between 1973 and 1981. The principal activity documented is the Canadian Health Administrator Study (1978-1981), for which Dr. Hastings was the principal investigator. Other files document the W. K. Kellogg Foundation grants, seminars and a name change in 2001 to the Department of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation.

The fifth section [box 029] begins with the formation of the Division of Community Health in the Faculty of Medicine in 1975, as the School of Hygiene was being dismantled, and the appointment of Dr. Hastings as associate dean. The principal subsequent activities documented here are the annual refresher course (1978), an advisory task force on the development of a professional master’s degree (1975-1978), a strategic plan for the Division (1990), and the 1992 divisional report. The files on the Graduate Department of Community Health [box 030] concentrate on program changes and reviews between 1979 and 1996 and on student research days (1990, 1997, 1998).

Issues relating to environmental health at the University of Toronto have traditionally been spread across several disciplines. The Faculty of Medicine’s Occupational and Environmental Health Unit was one such body in the early 1980s. In 1988 Dr. Hastings was appointed a member of a task force on environmental and human health, and throughout 1990 a work party on environmental and human health was the venue for discussions between the U of T and McMaster University over the creation of a joint Institute of Environment and Health which emerged during the following two years. Records here document the discussions and planning that took place and include the inaugural workshop in November 1991.

The next three boxes [031-033] contain records detailing the planning for and the first decade (1988-2001) of the Division of Community Health’s Centre for Health Promotion.
Included are initial proposals for the Centre, files on the interim management committee and the search first for an interim and then a permanent director, and meetings of the Centre’s advisory board. There are also files on workshops and seminars and a proposal on devolution submitted to the Premier’s Council on Health, Well-Being and Social Justice in 1993. These are followed by files on the Centre for International Health and the Department of Public Health Sciences, a 1997 merger of the departments of Behavioural Science and Preventive Medicine and Biostatistics. This section concludes with another task force (2002), on the future of the Centre for Health Promotion.

There then follows files documenting two City of Toronto projects from the end of the 1980s, the Board of Health’s Healthy Toronto 2000: a strategy for a healthier city and the city’s health care fund, both of which attracted considerable interest in the Faculty of Medicine, and files on Hastings’ participation in an advisory committee of the Wellesley Hospital relating to its urban community health project.

The series concludes with files on seven research proposals, of which five were rejected. The accepted projects were an annotated bibliography on the rationalization of child and material health services (1990) and of stakeholder perceptions of changes in the health care system (1991).

Professional associations and activities

Professor Franceschetti has been deeply involved with a number of professional associations, especially the Associazione Internazionale per gli Studi di Lingua e Letteratura Italiana (AISLLI), the Canadian Federation of the Humanities and its publication committee, and the Canadian Society for Italian Studies (CSIS). The files on AISLLI are particularly extensive, partly because its 12th convention was held in Canada, with Professor Franceschetti as co-ordinator of the organizing committee. There are files on most of the other AISLLI conventions between 1983 and 1997and some of its general assembly meetings. With CSIS, most of the files document Professor Franceschetti’s work as associate editor and then editor of its journal, Quaderni d’Italianistica. The files here include extensive correspondence with the writers of articles and some financial records. There are also files on CSIS’ nominating committee and most of its annual conferences.

The other organizations documented in this series are the American Association for Italian Studies (its 1980 and 1990 conferences), the American Boccaccio Association, the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (its 1990 conference), the Canadian Mediterranean Institute and its Canadian Academic Centre in Italy, the Centro di Studi Umanistici “Angelo Poliziano”, the Dante Society of Toronto, the Humanities Research Council of Canada, the International Association of Hispanists, and the Modern Language Association of America. The series ends with a file on the World Petrarch Conference in Washington, DC in 1974.

The files contain a wide range of correspondence, minutes of meetings, grant applications, programmes, some drafts of addresses, legal documents such as constitutions, appraisals of applications for funding of publications, and associated material, and posters.

Star Cluster Files and Index Cards

The Star Cluster files, assembled over her 40 years as an astronomer, represent the core of Dr. Hogg's research in a field for which she is an authority and from which many of her published articles were derived. The files are variously comprised of raw data, calculations, correspondence, draft and published articles relating to specific globular clusters. Prints from photographic plates also accompany some files . Most files are titled according to the New General Catalogue number, e.g. NGC 6626, of the star cluster and are arranged numerically following Dr. Hogg's own filing system.

A set of ten boxes of bibliographic index cards accompanies the Star Cluster Files. Cards in boxes seem to relate to specific subjects ie. external galaxies, variables in clusters, interstellar absorption. Boxes /044 - /048 are arranged more or less chronologically by the date of the bibliographic references. All were used for various editions of "A Catalogue of Variable Stars in Globular Clusters". Box B1994-0002/048 appears to relate specifically to references used in "A of Bibliography of Individual Globular Clusters" and its supplement. Index cards in box B1994-0002/049 do not appear to be bibliographic references but rather relate information on specific star clusters and are arranged by NGC number.

Photographs have been left in their original files because of their immediate association with the research materials. It was feared that removal of these photos from individual files would obscure the meaning of both the research in the file and the photographs themselves.

Addresses, manuscripts and publications

At convocations, seminars and conferences, Professor Harris spoke on topics relating to university affairs and the study of higher education. This series contains original and copies of his addresses, lectures, notes, and papers that he presented at academic events as well as undated typescripts, correspondence, manuscripts. His research material for the Graduate Studies Lecture Series contain information relating to prominent academic staff, namely, J.C. McLennan, J.P. MacMurrich, A.B. Macallum, Andrew Hunter, Harold Innis, George Sidney Brett and Andrew Gordon.

Articles and reviews written by Professor Harris, programmes of events he attended, and sample invitation cards issued by him as Principal of Innis College form part of a scrapbook, which also has an original photo of Professor Harris with unidentified group.

Law school activities

The records in this series document Professor Friedland’s activities as a student, professor of law, and as an administrator in his capacity as dean of the Faculty of Law at the University of Toronto.

Employment

The records in this series document Frederic Urban’s employment record up to 1999. There are files on his public school teaching in Massachusetts, his being a director of Networks Ltd. in Halifax, his years at the University of Waterloo, including his visiting professorship in
China, his year as a director of the S. L. Simpson Gallery, and his employment by the University of Toronto. The arrangement is by position of employment.

The first few files contain primarily correspondence and, in the case of his employment at the University of Waterloo, outlines of courses he taught, Architecture 192 and 193.
There are, in addition, a large number of slides relating to his teaching activities there. The
material relating to Urban’s years at the University of Toronto consists almost entirely of teaching slides.

Urban was occasionally asked to photograph the work of architects and designers. The two examples in this series are from 1982: photographs of “Haig House” as redesigned by George Baird and slides of Melvin Charney’s A Toronto Construction, built at 139 King Street East.

The last three boxes of this series document Urban’s activities as visiting professor, Nanjing Institute of Technology (renamed South East University in May 1988), Nanjing, China, in 1987 and 1988. The files contain correspondence relating to the exchange program and with professors and students, background material, briefing books, journals, lecture notes and student exercises, exhibition material, memorabilia, the report Urban wrote on his return, and press clippings. Accompanying these files is a selection of photographs and slides. Box 011 contains the drawings done by his students.

The series ends with files on the S. L. Simpson Gallery and slides used for lectures at the University of Toronto between 1992 and 1999. The slides are arranged by year, where identified as such.

University of Toronto Administrative Committees

This series documents some of Prof. McNeill's administrative positions within the University including member of the Slowpoke Reactor Committee (1970-1991); the Council of the Faculty of Medicine (1962-1967); the Presidential Advisory Committee on Appointments and Terms of Office (Haist Committee) (1964-1968); as well as various administrative positions with Trinity College. The amount and type of records vary from one position to another but usually include copies of minutes, correspondence, reports and memoranda and some original correspondence between Prof. McNeill and other committee members.

Organizations and conferences

Dr. Glass belonged to many professional associations, and was in wide demand at conferences. He also, as already has been noted, was deeply involved in a number of organizations devoted to various causes on behalf of Jewish peoples. The activities of both groups overlapped, especially on the issue of scientific freedom.

The organizations represented here are the Committee on Scientific Freedom and Responsibility of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (1980-1981), the Canadian Committee of Scientists and Scholars (1980-1981), the Commission on Post-Secondary Education in Ontario (1971), the Committee of Concerned Scientists (1980-1986), the 2nd International Colloquium on Gasdynamics of Explosions held in Novosibirisk, USSR, in 1969 (1966-1972), the International Conference in Honour of Andrei Sakharov (1981), the 15th International Congress of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics held at the University of Toronto in 1980 (1979-1980), the Sino-Judaic Institute (1981-1990), and the University of Toronto protest regarding anti-Semitism in the USSR (1976-1978).

The organization files contain primarily correspondence, with some background and other reports, programs, notes, manuscripts and press clippings. The conference files also contain some addresses.

The arrangement is alphabetical.

Photographs

As an engineering student at the University of Toronto, D. F. McCarthy was involved in a number of activities including water polo, and as a member, 4th year Executive of Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering. Included are photographs water polo teams, graduation photos for high school and university, class photographs, as a professional engineer with the City of Toronto and as an alumnus of U of T., including the Chancellor’s Circle (1994) and Arbor Award (1993). Also included is sketch by Owen Staples of “Memorial Tower University of Toronto” ca 1930.

Employment

Except for photographs, this series contains little documentation on Davidson Black’s employment before 1917 when he enlisted with the Canadian Army Medical Corps and went overseas. The bulk of this series relates to his work in China at the Peking Union Medical College, his anthropological research including his discovery of "Peking man", and his travels within China and to Mongolia, India, Siam, and elsewhere.

The files contain correspondence, photographs, addresses, and publications (including some drafts), and memorabilia. Most of the photographs were taken by Dr. Black himself, though some were taken by Adena and others (especially presentation copies) by friends and colleagues. Dr. Black carefully annotated many of the photos he took, often in considerable detail even to the time of day and the shutter speed used. Included are a few glass-plate negatives and about 50 lantern slides. The negatives are usually dated and were kept except if they were in good condition. On his travels, Dr. Black collected autographed photographs of many of the scientists and academics he met; these are included in this series.

Miscellaneous

Series consists of other posters for various events and announcements, including Board of Governor elections, hearings, examinations, contests, exhibitions, and new book announcements. See item listing for more details.

Addresses

This series documents Dr. Mastromatteo’s research and advocacy in the form of addresses. The addresses in this series are mostly Dr. Mastromatteo’s but there are some addresses by others, possibly sent to him for review or reference purposes. There are also some small amounts of reference material filed with his addresses.

The addresses in this series are mainly about occupational health, with some on environmental issues and human rights issues as they relate to occupational health (for example workers’ compensation). Most addresses in this series were given at meetings of professional associations with a small number of talks given at private companies.

Records in this series include notes, manuscripts, correspondence, projector slides, reports and press clippings.

Graphic material

Includes photoprints, illustrations, film and glass lantern slides and exhibit display panels documenting research on the liver. Boxes 001P and 003P contain mainly images from his book The Scarring of the Liver Acini. Many of the images were used in other publications, as well as for seminars, exihibits and lectures.

Advocacy

Throughout his teaching career at the University of Toronto, Prof. Rayside has been an advocate on gay, lesbian and feminist issues. His university advocacy activities are numerous. Between 1985 and 1987, he served on the Ad Hoc Committee on the Status of Women, University of Toronto. Prof. Rayside was also a Member of the Sexual Harassment Hearing Panel, University of Toronto, 1988-1992. In this capacity, he heard the first case under the new Sexual Harassment Policy, Torfason vs. Hummel. He was a founding member and coordinator of the Committee on Homophobia from 1989-1991 and remained a member until 1994. In addition, between 1989 and 1994, Prof. Rayside was a member of the Men’s Forum. He also served on the Teach-In Committee and was responsible for organising a university-wide teach-in on sexism and violence against women in 1990. Prof. Rayside also participated on the Ad hoc crisis team to handle the case of a U. of T. residence student with AIDS, 1991-1992, and helped prepare a discussion of report on university AIDS policy. He also assisted in the organisation of the “Queer Sites: Studies in Lesbian and Gay Culture” Conference in 1993.

Records in this series document Prof. Rayside’s advocacy activities and leadership on equity issues relating to gender and sexual orientation. Types of records include: correspondence, reports, briefs, notes, meeting minutes, programmes, and conference posters.

Committees documented in B1998-0029 are: Ad Hoc Committee on the Status of Women; Ad hoc crisis team to handle the case of a U. of T. residence student with AIDS; Men’s Forum, Queer Sites Conference Organising Committee; Sexual Harassment Hearing Panel; and Teach-In Committee.

Groups or committees documented in B2008-0023 include: Committee on Homophobia, Men’s Forum, Positive Space Campaign, Lesbian and Gay Academic Society, Toronto Centre for Gay and Lesbian Studies, Working Group on Policy Issues (response to homelessness) and the Equity Committee for the Canadian Federation of Humanities and Social Sciences. Other files generally document Rayside’s involvement on issues of pay equity, diversity, human rights as well a gay and lesbian rights. There are two files that document the Bent on Change conferences in 2000 and 2002 of which Rayside was a key organizer. Finally, filed separately because of restrictions are two files documenting Rayside’s legal challenges against councillor Betty Disero over election funding.

Groups or committees documented in B2013-0015 include the Bill 7 Coalition, The Body Politic, Canadian Lesbian and Gay Archives, Canadian Union of Public Employees, Community Research Initiative of Toronto, Free the Press Foundation, Committee on Homophobia, Positive Space Campaign, Right to Privacy Committee, and the Toronto Gay Community Council. There are also select files related to court cases and affidavits Prof. Rayside was involved in, or wrote, and files related to activism carried out within the University of Toronto, as well as his work related to gender issues, including the Hummel case. Files are arranged alphabetically by name of the group, organization, or person they pertain to, and in rare cases, the name of the issue they concern, if no group, organization, or person name is available. This series also contains one file of photographs and one file of artifacts.

Pulp and Paper Research Institute of Canada

When Pierre Gendron took over as Director of PPRIC, he obtained approval from the Board to appoint a small committee to report on specific issues that were raising concerns amongst the members of the Institute. Dr. Solandt chaired the committee, which met during the early months of 1978 and presented a report in May.

This series contains correspondence relating to the activities of the Review Committee, along with minutes, memoranda, notes, and reports.

International Centre for Diarrhoeal Diseases Research, Bangladesh (ICDDRB)

Dr. Solandt was a member of the original Board of ICDDRB, which inaugurated the new organization to replace the Cholera Research Centre in 1979, and remained on it until 1982. While there he took considerable interest in the financial management of the Centre, and was also concerned with maintaining its international status.

This series contains detailed correspondence, minutes, memoranda and reports documenting the problems that ICDDRB faced and the limited success that was met by Dr. Solandt and others in addressing them. Dr. Solandt

International Centre for Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE)

ICIPE, based in Nairobi, is one of two important international research centres (the other is WARDA) whose origins lie in the native populations of the area in which they operate. Late in 1976, Omond Solandt was asked to join the Board of ICIPE, which was badly in need of help in management. He formally took his seat in June, 1977 and the reorganization that he engineered addressed problems of efficiency, a lingering colonial mentality, and the appointment of a new chair. A financial crisis forced Solandt to assume the duties as chair in April, 1982, a position he retained for a year. He remained actively associated with ICIPE until 1987 and in 1989 was a one of the founders of its Honorary Alumni Association.

The correspondence, minutes, background papers, reports, programs, publications and photoprints and slides provide a thorough documentation of the complex problems that Dr. Solandt faced at ICIPE, the progress that was made in resolving them, and the impact of many individuals involved in it, especially its founder, Dr. Tom Odhiambo.

Centro Internacional de Majorimiente de Maiz y Trigo/International Maize And Wheat Improvement Centre (CIMMYT)

Dr. Solandt was appointed to the Board of CIMMYT in 1976 and remained for ten years, until April, 1986. One his last official acts was to participate in the selection of a new Director-General. He also sat on the Board of another of the CGIAR centres, ICARDA, and two that were similar but not part of CGIAR, the International Centre for Insect Physiology and Ecology in Nairobi and the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Diseases Research in Dhaka, Bangladesh. His experience in CIMMYT was central to all this involvement. After he retired from the Board, he conducted, in April, 1988, a brief management review of the organization as a prelude to a more extensive review by CGIAR later in the year.

This series contains correspondence, agenda books for Board meetings, notes, notices, memo-randa, drafts of reports and reviews, other reports and publications, programs and photoprints that provide detailed coverage of the functions of the organization and Solandt

Research, publications and presentations

Series consists of records related to Joan and Frederick Winter’s archaeological research, particularly their study of Pausauias’ travels. Material includes typescripts, background research material, and images. In addition to a published article, a significant portion of the material documents the presentation of the couple’s research through scripts, a ‘photographic companion’ (annotated) album, and slides.

Correspondence

This series includes some professional correspondence but much of it consists of letters to and from Dr. Hastings’ parents, his grandmother, his aunts, Bessie Ferguson, Betty Graham and Louise Hastings, and other relatives and friends met over a lifetime of public service and devotion to his church. The last influenced many of his interests outside his academic and administrative work at University of Toronto, and is reflected in thirty years of correspondence arising from visits to India and Japan beginning in the early 1950s.

While most of the correspondence is filed chronologically, the first files contain exchanges of letters with the Drever family (especially Michael Drever), the politician Eugene Forsey, and the relatives mentioned above. Dr. Hastings met the Drevers from Montevideo, Uruguay, in 1959, when he went on a tour of Latin America to observe preventive medicine and public health teaching. He was to return to Uruguay at the end of 1964 as a member of the World Health Organization/Pan American Health Organization program on health planning in Latin America that also entailed visits to Chile and Argentina (he had a regular correspondent from Santiago after that date).

Dr. Hastings first went to India in 1953 as the University of Toronto’s representative to the World University Service International Seminar (the files for which are in Series 5). While there he first visited the Christian Medical College and Hospital in Vellore, near Madras, that received support from the Canadian Council of Churches through its Vellore/Ludhiana Committee, of which he was a member from 1962 to 1975 and to which he was an advisor from 1975 to 1981. Over the years Dr. Hasting was to provide financial support to many young people he met in India, helping some with their education overseas and others to immigrate to Canada. In 1955 he had the opportunity to go abroad again, this time as a faculty member of the WUS International Seminar, Japan, followed by a month for studying medical education and medical care in that country. He wrote a widely praised report on his return, and kept up a voluminous correspondence with many of the people he had met. In later years Dr. Hastings came to regard these two visits as seminal events in his life.

The first files of chronological correspondence is primarily with his parents, consisting largely of letters sent and received while at Camp Kagawong on Balsam Lake near Fenelon Falls, Ontario where Hastings was to spend many summers from about 1937 and where he was sometime counsellor and a director. (Correspondence from his vacation trips to Quebec in 1943 and 1946 is filed in Series 1). From 1953 and his visit to India, the chronological arrangement is divided in each year into the following categories: general, parents (later ‘mother’, India and (from 1955) Japan.

The volume of correspondence tails off in the mid-1970s; one file covers the years 1986-1997.

Hart House Theatre

Marion Walker was Production Assistant at Hart House Theatre from 1946 to 1957. Under the directorship of Robert Gill, she designed sets and costumes for each of the Theatre’s annual four plays. Her first production was St. Joan, starring Charmian King. Other early performers who worked with Ms. Walker at Hart House Theatre included Kate Reid, Donald Sutherland, and William Hutt.

The records in this series pertain to Ms. Walker’s involvement with Hart House Theatre. Textual records include scripts 1946, annotated Hart House Theatre programmes 1946 – 1957, and obituaries for Robert Gill, 1974.

Series also includes approximately 100 photographs of various productions for which Ms. Walker designed costumes and sets. The photographs depict various scenes, actors and set designs. Productions represented are: Romeo and Juliet, 1947; Julius Caesar, 1948; the Seagull, 1948; The Skin of Our Teeth, 1948, The Doctor’s Dilemma, 1948; Crime and Punishment, 1949; Othello, 1949; Fortune My Foe, 1950; The Guardsman, 1950; Captain Brassbound’s Conversion, 1950; Medea, 1950; Henry IV, 1950; Marco Millions, 1950; Richard II, 1951; Pygmalion, 1951; The Madwoman of Chaillot, 1951; The Admirable Crichton, 1952; The Winslow Boy, 1952; Macbeth, 1952; The Wild Duck, 1953; The School for Wives, 1956; and The Innocent, 1957.

Series also contains 8 sketchbooks of costume designs for the following Hart House productions: The Internal Machine, 1946; Othello, 1949; Medea, 1950; Richard II, 1951; School for Wives, 1956; Hamlet, [n.d.]; and King Lear, [n.d.].

University of Toronto

This series contains records relating to Professor Peers’ activities as a professor and professor emeritus, as an alumnus, and as a very generous donor to the University of Toronto and also to Queen’s University. Included is general information about his retirement, correspondence and related material regarding the Department of Political Science. There are also extensive files of correspondence, donor agreements, endowment reports, and other material regarding scholarships and fellowships that he funded in the Department of Political Science and elsewhere, and a file on the purchase of and later transfer to the University of Toronto of his condominium at 190 St. George St.

Education

Robert Spencer received his elementary, high school, and undergraduate education in Montreal, at Kensington School, the High School of Montreal, and McGill University respectively. The files relating to these stages of Professor Spencer’s education contain correspondence, report cards and certificates, term papers, programmes for student dinners and graduation ceremonies, short stories, student newspapers and yearbooks, flyers and other material relating to student organizations, and social activities.
The basic arrangement is by the institutions that Professor Spencer attended, with some files on teacher training during and after his undergraduate years at McGill.

Professor Spencer was on military service in Europe from 1942 to 1946. Once back in Canada, he decided to undertake post-graduate work in history. C.P. Stacey, Director of the Historical Section of the General Staff at Canadian Military Headquarters in London, England, for which Spencer had been working since the beginning of 1946 under the direction of Eric Harrison, could not find funds to assist him. Harrison, who in civil life was a professor of history at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, supported Spencer’s applications for scholarships; he was successful in getting the James C. Cumming Fellowship from Trinity College in the University of Toronto. From 1946 to 1950, he also received ‘university training” funds from the Department of Veterans Affairs. Spencer spent a year (1946-1947) at the U of T, studying under Professors Ralph Flenley and G.P. de T. Glazebrook and reading widely. His MA thesis, “History of the Fifteenth Canadian Field Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery, 1941-1945”, was essentially the study he had written while with the Canadian Forces in the Netherlands in 1945; 1,000 copies of which had been printed by Elsevier in Amsterdam.

Following his graduation from the University of Toronto, Spencer applied to study modern history at Oxford University and was accepted by St. John’s College. He received funding from McGill University (Moyse Travelling Fellowship worth $350), the Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire (Overseas Scholarship, $800), and part (₤30) of a scholarship from the British Council. In September, 1947 he sailed on the Queen Mary to Southampton. He studied under W. Norton Medlicott and A.J.P. Taylor, receiving his B.Litt in 1950. He was then accepted to do a Doctor of Philosophy.

The files relating to his graduate studies contain correspondence, official documents, essays, programmes, flyers, press clippings, booklets relating to Oxford, St. John’s College, and the Bodleian Library, greeting cards and other souvenirs of his time at Oxford.

Education

Omond Solandt attended Mulvey School in Winnipeg from 1915 to November 1920, when his family moved to Toronto. He then attended Rosedale Junior Public School, transferring to Central Technical School in 1922. For his last year of high school he attended Jarvis Collegiate.

He enrolled at the University of Toronto in 1927, as an undergraduate at Victoria College. He graduated with a BA in 1931 with first class honours in biological and medical sciences. Omond

Research files

These files consist of correspondence, notes, photographs and negatives, articles used for research, and drafts of manuscripts relating to Professor Rouillard's ongoing research about the Turks in French history, thought, and literature.

Correspondence

The correspondence files in this series are arranged alphabetically by author. They document Professor Friedland’s activities as a friend, as a student advisor and thesis supervisor, as a colleague assisting in honours bestowed on his peers, as an author, and as an authority on legal matters. They also document the increased leisure that came with official retirement.

The correspondence touches on many aspects of Dr. Friedland’s life, both personal and professional. It reveals his enormous network of contacts in legal and academic circles ranging from Lord Denning down to lowly law students. The letters cover a wide range of topics and issues, including some very topical ones such as international terrorism. Dr. Friedland received numerous requests for references from students and colleagues and, because he sat on the manuscript review committee of the University of Toronto Press, he was also asked to evaluate many manuscripts.

Some of the files contain commentary on legal issues on which Dr. Friedland was working. They may also hold drafts of articles forwarded by colleagues for commentary or presented a complementary copies [published copies have been removed, though the appropriate references have been retained], letters of congratulation and of reference. There is also correspondence regarding and programmes of conferences, and correspondence re and programmes for installation ceremonies. There are numerous invitations to dinners and other events and tributes on the deaths of friends and colleagues and notes on any of the above. Also present are greeting cards and several photographs.

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