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Christian Bay fonds
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Christian Bay fonds

  • UTA 1047
  • Fonds
  • 1938-1997

This accession documents Professor Bay’s personal and professional life. A little over half of the material consists of correspondence to and from Bay of a professional and personal nature. Some of the personal letters include frank opinions of situations in his professional life. Approximately half of the correspondence includes carbon copies and originals written by Bay. The principal years covered are the 1960s to the 1980s. There is also a great deal of material on the Norwegian resistance movement.

The addresses, publications and manuscripts form the second and third largest grouping of material. The latter consists of final copies, drafts, and correspondence related to tributes, letters to the editor, book reviews, as well as books, book chapters, and articles written by Bay from 1949 to 1987.

The remainder of the material consists of personal and biographical documents ( his “personal collections” include ‘illegal’ papers of the Norwegian resistance during World War II); annotated books and offprints sent to Bay; some of his teaching material at the following universities: Michigan State, the University of California Berkley, Stanford, Alberta, and Toronto; material related to his activities in professional associations such as the American Political Science Association and the Caucus for a New Political Science; photographs; and special media which mainly includes recordings of addresses.

This fonds also includes a small sous-fonds on the personal and professional life of his wife, Juanita Bay.

Bay, Christian

Biographical and personal records

The series consists of biographical and personal records of Professor Bay. The material reflects his personal life, and includes press clippings, articles, and a thesis about him; personal documents such as educational records; documents of identification; personal papers related to life events (baptism, marriage, home ownership, inheritance, death certificates); calendars and a condolence scrapbook.

The arrangement of the material begins with biographical information (press clippings, biographies, curriculum vitae, referees, work about Bay), then personal papers, followed by what he termed “his personal collection”, consisting of items primarily in Norwegian relating to his family and Norway generally. The most intriguing portion of this “collection” is the folders of “illegal papers” [/002(28) – (30)] that Professor Bay buried when he hurriedly left Norway early in World War II and which he dug up sometime after he returned. There are also books about Norwegian resistance, and two books by his uncle.

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