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Early biographical information

The records in this series provide biographical information on Marion Walker’s early life, 1921-1942. Series includes 7 photographs. Subjects are: 5 portraits of Marion Walker; the Phi Beta sorority, 1940; and the University College graduating class, 1942. Also included is a scrapbook of newspaper clippings concerning Ms. Walker’s amateur golfing activities, 1937-1941.

Student reports and theses

This series consists of student projects collected by van Ginkel over the years. Included are examples of theses, theses programs and drafts, technical reports, mounted exhibits. This is a multimedia series consisting of textual records, architectural drawings, photographs and slides. Along with Series VI, this series best documents what was taught within the Faculty, how it was taught and how this knowledge was interpreted and applied by individual students. Most of the records are from the late 1980s but there are some projects that date back to the early 1960s which were probably collected during the Centenary exhibit, Restatements and Realizations.

Teaching files

Included are lectures, assignments, student evaluations, project reviews, thesis statements and reports. Also found in these files are correspondence, memos and notes on the teaching of various courses within the Faculty of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. Arrangement is by course chronological.

Professional associations

This series consists of minutes, memorandum, correspondence, discussion papers and membership lists documenting van Ginkel's wider activities within her profession through various associations. Included are numerous files from the Ontario Association of Architects while she served on its Registration Board, and from the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture of which she was president in 1986/87. Her activities in other associations noted here include the Congress of International Union of Architects and the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada. Records are grouped by association and are filed chronologically.

Exhibition files

Files relating to the mounting of exhibits by faculty and students, most notably Connaitre/Reconnaitre Le Corbusier exhibit in 1987 and Restatements and Realizations: Built work of graduates of the School since 1893, put together by van Ginkel as part of the Centenary Celebrations.

The general administrative files around borrowing, lending and mounting exhibits are filed at the beginning of this series, followed by the specific administrative files on the above mentioned exhibits. Finally, files relating to exhibits borrowed and mounted at the Faculty's gallery are arranged in chronological order.

This series contains photographs, negatives and slides documenting the mounting of exhibits in the Faculty of Architecture including the 1983 exhibit on Le Corbusier and the school's centenary exhibit "Restatement and Realizations: Built work of graduates of the School since 1893". All photographs, slides and negatives have been removed, placed in their own files and boxed separately. In such cases, a SEPARATION NOTICE has been inserted to indicate the existence of graphic materials.

Administrative files

This series documents van Ginkel's administrative activities within the Faculty of Architecture. It consists of subject files arranged alphabetically by file title, containing, for the most part, notes, correspondence, memos, clippings, reports and minutes of meetings. Included are files relating to the planning of the Centenary Celebrations for the Faculty of Architecture, as well as records on the controversial recommendation to close the School of Architecture in 1986. Also included are files containing correspondence with the Dean, minutes of the Faculty Council and Programme Committee.

Day notes

These "notes" are essentially daily journals of events, listed usually by the name of the person with whom van Ginkel had dealings. Listed are appointments, meetings, deadlines, decisions made, things needed to be done or followed up on. They serve as a good overview of van Ginkel's activities but do not provide much detail.

Correspondence

This series consists of incoming and outgoing correspondence arranged chronologically. Included is some personal correspondence but most is professional correspondence with colleagues on varied academic and administrative topics including exhibits, issues on teaching architecture, research and design philosophy. Also included is administrative correspondence within the Faculty.

Photographs and slides

The photographs, slides and contact prints in this series consist mainly of images associated with the textual records and usually removed from them. The arrangement relates directly to the textual series of which they are part and then arranged chronologically within.

Manuscripts and publications

Professor Urban’s writings focus on the relationship between art and architectural design. Six of his publications are present in this series. Some of those that appeared before 1986 and all published afterward are absent. His earliest writing are based on his involvement with Networks Limited in Halifax, then on collaboration with New York City artist Brian Boigon, and finally on his research in Italy in the 1980s.

Lectures and criticism

Frederic Urban gave a number of addresses as a visiting artist and lecturer. In 1979 he was a visiting artist at Ohio State University, where he photographed a number of student street performances. In October 1981 he was guest lecturer with the Venice Study Abroad Program run by the Department of Architecture at the University of Toronto. The following year he was a guest lecturer at University College in the University of Toronto for Larry Richard’s course, “Introduction to architecture”. In 1984 and 1985 he gave lectures
on his Sacri Monti project at Carleton University and the University of Toronto. In 1991 he
was a visiting lecturer at the University of Wisconsin at Stout. Some of the addresses are documented in this series. For related correspondence, see Series 2.

Professor Urban was a member of the Board of Directors of the Sharon Temple Museum Society from 1996 to 2001 and he and Larry were invited to participate in a series of readings and performances.

Studio work, exhibitions and performances

This series begins with Frederick Urban’s formative years as an artist when he created a large number of exhibits and participated in some performance pieces, primarily in Halifax and New York City. For some of these, he drew on his personal experiences. Two examples are An Acadian genealogy (April 1977), inspired by his family roots in the Acadian region of Brunswick, and Monk (July 1977) by his training as a novice in 1961-1962.

The files cover his years at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (1976-1977), continue through his post-graduate studies at the Whitney Museum of American Art, his interest in the art and architecture of Italy (spurred on by his meeting Giuseppe Panza di Biumo), and several installations connected to Canadian architecture and architectural history. The last exhibition, ‘The place of work’, accompanied the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada’s annual conference in Winnipeg in 1989. The arrangement is primarily chronological.

The series ends with several files on performance pieces, the most significant being Anne Wilson and her Butler’s lives of the saints, which was performed both in Halifax and New York City, and an oversized folder of posters for exhibitions and performance pieces collected by Urban.

Some of the exhibitions and performance pieces contain correspondence, drawings and sketches, photographs and/or slides. A number are represented by a combination of photographs and slides or slides alone, with no textual accompaniment. There are also several oversized folders of sketches and drawings for of posters for exhibitions and performance pieces with which Urban was involved and one of posters for events which he may have attended but to which he did not contribute.

Research

Frederick Urban had a passionate interest in the art and architecture of Italy and much of his research, after his studies at the Whitney Museum of Modern Art, was focussed on that country. He received grants for two projects in Italy, “The Sacri Monti of Northern Italy” (1985-1989) and for his “House/Custoza” project (1985). The other principal grants funded his visiting professorship at Nanjing Institute of Technology/South East University in Nanjing, China in 1987 and 1988, the files for which are found in Series 4.

This series begins with general files on the Sacri Monti research project, including corres-pondence and grant applications, literature, maps, general research material, photographs, posters, and some tracings. There are also files for each year that Urban was in Italy, arranged chronologically. They document his itinerary and contain correspondence, a sampling of programs and brochures, programs for the Biennale of Venice (1985), and one journal (1986).

The series ends with files on exhibitions and performances of interest, along with a selection of slides, photoprints, postcards and posters. There is a folder of cards, notices and programs for a number of exhibitions and performances, primarily Canadian (1978-1992), followed by cards and catalogues for particular exhibits: Christo (1979-1982), Creative Time (including Butler’s lives of the saints), Garry Neil Kennedy, Miami University Art Museum, The New Yorker, and Andy Warhol/Jamie Wyeth. The slides are of ‘design elements’, raves in Toronto, the Toronto Sculpture Garden, and ‘Women study’. The photoprints are of streetscapes in Toronto, taken in the early 1980s. There are ‘Special postcards’ [design elements] collected by Urban, postcards of photographs taken by the British photographer, Frank Sutcliffe, ‘Die einrichtungen der Akaademie der Kűnste der DDR’ (1979), and ‘The theatre of architecture’ by Susan Speigel (Toronto, 1986).

Employment

The records in this series document Frederic Urban’s employment record up to 1999. There are files on his public school teaching in Massachusetts, his being a director of Networks Ltd. in Halifax, his years at the University of Waterloo, including his visiting professorship in
China, his year as a director of the S. L. Simpson Gallery, and his employment by the University of Toronto. The arrangement is by position of employment.

The first few files contain primarily correspondence and, in the case of his employment at the University of Waterloo, outlines of courses he taught, Architecture 192 and 193.
There are, in addition, a large number of slides relating to his teaching activities there. The
material relating to Urban’s years at the University of Toronto consists almost entirely of teaching slides.

Urban was occasionally asked to photograph the work of architects and designers. The two examples in this series are from 1982: photographs of “Haig House” as redesigned by George Baird and slides of Melvin Charney’s A Toronto Construction, built at 139 King Street East.

The last three boxes of this series document Urban’s activities as visiting professor, Nanjing Institute of Technology (renamed South East University in May 1988), Nanjing, China, in 1987 and 1988. The files contain correspondence relating to the exchange program and with professors and students, background material, briefing books, journals, lecture notes and student exercises, exhibition material, memorabilia, the report Urban wrote on his return, and press clippings. Accompanying these files is a selection of photographs and slides. Box 011 contains the drawings done by his students.

The series ends with files on the S. L. Simpson Gallery and slides used for lectures at the University of Toronto between 1992 and 1999. The slides are arranged by year, where identified as such.

Education

In the fall of 1960 Frederic Urban entered Merrimack College, a private Roman Catholic institution in North Andover, Massachusetts. In the summer of 1961, he studied Latin at Glastonbury Abbey, a Benedictine abbey in Hingham, Massachusetts, and that autumn entered the Augustinian Good Counsel Novitiate in New Hamburg, New York as a novice monk. In the fall of 1962 he returned to his studies at Merrimack, from which he received an AB (Humanities) in 1964. His other degrees were an MA in literature from Boston College in 1970, a Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) from the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (NSCAD) in 1978, followed by an independent study program at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1978-1979. This series documents his studies at the last two institutions. The arrangement is by name of institution.

The files relating to Urban’s studies at NSCAD and the Whitney Museum include his applications, covering correspondence, and material relating to courses taken. There are also a number of slides documenting his time at both institutions. Material on exhibitions and performance pieces done while a student is filed with Series 6. While at the Whitney, one of Frederic’s friends, Colin Lee, had an artwork published in a San Francisco Chinese newspaper. The series ends with a file on the Whitney Museum of American Art Independent Study Program Alumni Association.

Correspondence

This series begins with two files of general personal and professional correspondence, followed by files of correspondence with individuals and organizations, arranged alphabetically. The latter document principally Urban’s professional interests, including donations of copies of some of his portfolios to archival repositories, and with artists such as Brian Boignon, who hand-illustrated his correspondence and with whom Urban co-authored an article, and about Mrozinski, a New York musician and performance artist (with accompanying photographs and slides from a performance in 1978). Included also are letters from E. A. (Betty) Murray while vacationing in Italy in 1973.

Personal and biographical

The biographical information in this series is provided largely by several versions of Frederic Urban’s curriculum vitae. The other files contain a notebook (1975-1977) primarily on life in Boston and Halifax, a wall calendar (1981), greeting cards from his partner, Larry Richards, and others, design elements for a garden at Urban and Richards’ penthouse in Etobicoke, and material from a trip to Columbia at Christmas, 1976. Accompanying this textual material are two files of slides, one of “Danny, Halifax”, and the other “Studies for Natchitoches”, Urban and Richards’ property in Louisiana.

Professor Urban has always had a great interest in history, American politics and the presidency; the passion for politics he shared with his partner, Larry. In the late 1960s they both took part in demonstrations on the Boston Common against the Vietnam War; a poster by the Vietnam Moratorium Committee is a memento of that struggle. Another from that era is a special issue of Life (5 July 1968) on the Presidency.

Photographs

Series consists of photograph collections of N.J. Turnbull. There are twelve albums containing 432 photographs of the Royal Commission on Forestry relating to Newfoundland and Labrador in 1954. There are also two photo albums containing approximately 600 photographs in total that focus on Kukatush, Kapuskasing, Spring Camp, Smoky Line, Groundhog River Drive, and St. Williams, ranging in date from 1946 – 1953. In addition to the photo albums, there are also 8 loose photographs. Six of these were found in Album 2 [B2014-0018/003P(01)] and two from N.J. Turnbull’s Daily Journal [B2014-0018/003(04)]. The majority of the photographs have descriptions and identifications on the verso.

John Fulton Turnbull: Logging reports

Included in the N.J. Turnbull collection are seven logging reports produced by his father, J.F. Turnbull. The majority of the reports are the Annual Report of the Forester of the North Bay District (1923-1929) during his time as district forester there. There are several photographs that are included within the reports that have not been removed or catalogued, but pertain to the content of the report. The final item – a Certificate of Life Membership to the Ontario Professional Foresters Association – is oversized and therefore stored in a separate location.

Turnbull, John Fulton

Education and employment

This series consists of N.J. Turnbull’s records relating to his education at the University of Toronto in the Faculty of Forestry. Included are class notes, assignments, and laboratory reports. Three Field Books, co-produced with other students, are also included. The series also consists of Field Notes corresponding to specific regions, primarily Kapuskasing. N.J. Turnbull worked here as summer employment while still enrolled at the Faculty of Forestry. There are two Field Notes that span long periods of time (1939-1982 and 1988-2007 respectively) which appear to be miscellaneous notes. There are two Daily Journals which are comprised primarily of notes on the weather and geographical information. Additionally there are some other materials corresponding to N.J. Turnbull’s employment, including a booklet on insects which is accompanied by a letter addressed to N.J. Turnbull from the author of the booklet, a notebook regarding the S.F. Woodlands Strike, and two maps of the Ontario Timber Limits of the Spruce Falls Power & Paper Co.

Scripts

Series consists of three scripts written by Prof. Thornton, two of which are operettas.

Research notes and publishing

Series consists records that document a sampling of Prof. Thornton’s writing and research spanning from early in his career to 2003. Writing is comprised of predominantly academic articles, book chapters, and reviews on a range of topics including British imperial history, colonial states, power and individual rights. Material include typescripts, drafts, off-prints, and correspondence. Notes also cover similar areas of interest, though many are unidentified and partial.

University of Toronto

Series consist of records related to Prof. Thornton’s work with the UofT’s Presidential Advisory Board, specifically related to debates over the University’s divestment in South Africa. Records include copy of the report written by A.P. Thornton, meeting notes, press clippings, and background material.

References

Series consists of correspondence primarily with colleagues and third parties regarding assessments and recommendations for faculty positions, grants, or fellowship applications.

Teaching

Series consists of teaching material produced by A.P. Thornton at both the University of Toronto and the University of Aberdeen.

Presentations and addresses

Series consists of documentation of some of the presentations given by Prof. Thornton in both academic and community settings. Series also includes a recording of an address given by Thornton on the topic of war.

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