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Martin Lawrence Friedland fonds
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Friedland 1st 2002 accession

Records compiled by Professor Martin Friedland in the researching and writing of his University of Toronto: A history (University of Toronto Press, 2002). Included are correspondence files, files on the structure of the project, research notes and material, drafts of the manuscript, correspondence relating to publication matters, addresses, photographs, audiotapes, books, pamphlets and other publications.

The records document how the project was conceived and carried out, including the evolution of the manuscript and discussions over the shaping of the book. One consequence was putting the footnotes on line, a first for the University of Toronto Press, and also issuing them in a separate hardcopy volume. The records document the major issues at the University and, by extension, in higher education in Ontario over more than 175 years. The research reports, correspondence from academics, university administrators and graduates from across North America, original material forwarded by individuals, and the commentaries by some sixty people who read the whole manuscript, together provide extra breadth and depth to this historical record of the University.

Correspondence

The correspondents in this series number just under four hundred individuals, of whom sixty-two read and commented on the entire manuscript (these names are listed on page 723 of the 2002 hardcover edition). The correspondents include Professor Friedland’s research assistants, archivists in the University of Toronto Archives, officials and editors at the University of Toronto Press, other editors, writers and independent researchers with an interest in the University’s history, and members of the public that Professor Friedland met in the course of his research and his giving of talks about the history of the University. The majority of the correspondents are academics and administrative personnel at the University of Toronto and elsewhere who were asked for information or offered their expertise. Some of the correspondence is post-publication reaction to the book.

The research assistants (in addition to those listed in Series I), are Sara Burke, David Bronskill, Colin Grey, Graham Rawlinson and Katrina Wyman. Of the staff in the University of Toronto Archives, Harold Averill was seconded part-time to the project to direct the researchers to the appropriate sources in the University Archives, to offer his knowledge of the history of the University and to read the manuscript. Other correspondents from the Archives are Garron Wells (University Archivist), Marnee Gamble (special media archivist) and Loryl MacDonald (administrative records archivist). The University of Toronto Press, the publisher of the book, is represented by Val Cooke, Ani Deyirmenjian, Malgosia Halliop, Bill Harnum, Anne Laughlin,
Melissa Pitts, and Ron Schoeffel. Presidents (past and current) of the University represented are: Robert Birgeneau, Claude Bissell, George Connell, Robert Prichard, and David Strangway. Some of the academics and university administrators forwarded drafts of articles or excerpts from books they were writing, while others commented on the manuscript or portions thereof. Papers or lengthy memoranda and reports are present on a cross-section of activities, disciplines themes and individuals relating to the University including (with the names of the correspondents in brackets). They include the admission of women (Sara Burke), botanical gardens (John Court), chemistry (Susanne McClelland), Connaught Laboratories (George Connell), engineering (Richard White), fees policy (David Stager), gays and lesbians (David Rayside), Jacob Hirschfelder (Sheldon J. Godfrey), Margaret Eaton School (John Byl), history of medicine (Jacalyn Duffin), medicine (David Bronskill), No. 4 General Hospital at Salonika, Greece during World War I (Mary Louise Gaby), philosophy (John Slater), the proposed Wolfe’s University (D. V. Anderson), women (Katrina Wyman), and women in graduate studies (Natalie Zemon Davis).

In addition to letters, the files may contain articles, notes, memoranda, background documents and publications, and the occasional press clipping A few of the files contain historical items, dating back to 1887, that had belonged early graduates and were forwarded by their descendants, Professor Friedland’s correspondents. The detailed comments on the drafts of the book by the correspondents in this series may, for the most part, be found in Series 4.

Personal and family

This series consists of files documenting Professor Friedland’s personal and family activities. It begins with a number of files documenting Friedland’s activities as a student and professor of law at the University of Toronto, his post-retirement professional and other activities. There follow files relating to members of his family, arranged by name, which focus broadly on family affairs and more specifically on personal lives, including professional and social activities, achievements, births, weddings and deaths. These are followed by other files containing correspondence sent home from England, Europe and Israel, and relating to the Friedland residences on Hillsdale Avenue and Belsize Drive.

The files contain correspondence, appointment books, certificates, curriculum vitae, greeting cards, honours, notes, notices, legal documents such as passports and wills, medical reports, programmes, postcards, photographs, and press clippings (including obituaries).

Honours

The files in this series contain correspondence, addresses, certificates, programmes, and a photoprint relating to honours bestowed in Professor Friedland.

The honours described herein are: Queen’s Council (Canada), 1976; James Marshall Tory Dean’s Chair, Faculty of Law, University of Toronto, 1996; an LLD degree from Cambridge University (2000); and an honorary degree from the University of Toronto (2001).

Correspondence

The correspondence files in this series are arranged alphabetically by author. They document Professor Friedland’s activities as a friend, as a student advisor and thesis supervisor, as a colleague assisting in honours bestowed on his peers, as an author, and as an authority on legal matters. They also document the increased leisure that came with official retirement.

The correspondence touches on many aspects of Dr. Friedland’s life, both personal and professional. It reveals his enormous network of contacts in legal and academic circles ranging from Lord Denning down to lowly law students. The letters cover a wide range of topics and issues, including some very topical ones such as international terrorism. Dr. Friedland received numerous requests for references from students and colleagues and, because he sat on the manuscript review committee of the University of Toronto Press, he was also asked to evaluate many manuscripts.

Some of the files contain commentary on legal issues on which Dr. Friedland was working. They may also hold drafts of articles forwarded by colleagues for commentary or presented a complementary copies [published copies have been removed, though the appropriate references have been retained], letters of congratulation and of reference. There is also correspondence regarding and programmes of conferences, and correspondence re and programmes for installation ceremonies. There are numerous invitations to dinners and other events and tributes on the deaths of friends and colleagues and notes on any of the above. Also present are greeting cards and several photographs.

Friedland 1998 accession

Records documenting the life of Martin L. Friedland, as a student, professor of law and administrator at the University of Toronto; as an expert on legal matters and a contributor to the formation of public policy at the provincial and federal levels; and as an author of sixteen books and numerous articles. Also personal records of William Paul McClure Kennedy, professor of law.

Included in this accession is correspondence, certificates and diplomas, diaries, course and lecture notes, memoranda, minutes of meetings, notes, research material, manuscripts, transcripts of oral history interviews, audiotapes, radio scripts, book reviews, books, pamphlets, reports, press clippings, photographs and maps.

Friedland 2nd 2002 accession

Personal records of Martin L. Friedland, Professor and former Dean of Law, consisting of personal and professional correspondence, certificates, memoranda, notes, briefs, reports, and drafts of publications relating to his administrative and other activities in the Faculty of Law and other divisions at the University of Toronto, various legal organizations, his work as a consultant, and his writings.

The publications documented in depth are a comparison of jury selection in Canada and the United States, judicial independence in Canada, and the eighth edition of his casebook on criminal law. Dr. Friedland’s work as a consultant includes studies for the federal Somalia enquiry, the Criminal Justice Review Committee and the Office of the Attorney General of Ontario, and projects for other provincial and territorial governments. Other files document his activities as a member of the Board and Manuscript Review Committee of the University of Toronto Press, and a number of other organizations including the Canada-China Senior Judges Training program, the Osgoode Society, the Royal Society of Canada. Included are photographs and a video.

Graphic material

The photographs in this series document the personal and professional life of Professor Friedland. The series beings with eleven files of photographs relating to Professor Friedland and his family, including formal portraits of himself, and informal images of his parents, his wife and children, and other relatives. Other images document events at the Faculty of Law, including informal parties and reunions; honours (including awards and honorary degrees) bestowed upon Friedland and his colleagues in law and university administration; and photographs relating to some of his research projects, including the University of Toronto history project.

Friedland 2014 accession

Further personal records of Professor Emeritus Martin L. Friedland, consisting of files documenting personal and family activities and achievements and honours bestowed; correspondence; Faculty of Law and other University of Toronto activities; research and publications, and addresses; files on the first and second editions of his "The University of Toronto: a history (2002 and 2013), and of "The Campus guide - University of Toronto"; and files on committee work and other professional activities.

Martin L. Friedland personal records

Records documenting the life of Martin L. Friedland, as a student, professor of law and administrator at the University of Toronto; as an expert on legal matters and a contributor to the formation of public policy at the provincial and federal levels; and as an author of sixteen books and numerous articles.

Included in this accession is correspondence, certificates and diplomas, diaries, course and lecture notes, memoranda, minutes of meetings, notes, research material, manuscripts, transcripts of oral history interviews, audiotapes, radio scripts, book reviews, books, pamphlets, reports, press clippings, photographs and maps.

Law school activities

The records in this series document Professor Friedland’s activities as a student, professor of law, and as an administrator in his capacity as dean of the Faculty of Law at the University of Toronto.

Law School: Student, Professor, and Dean

The four boxes in this sub-series contain documents relating to my experience as a student, my four years at Osgoode Hall Law School, and my time as a law teacher and dean at the University of Toronto Law School.

There are very few documents relating to my student days at law school (files 2 and 3), apart from my moot factum (file 2) and notes and a small paper prepared for Abe Weston’s jurisprudence course and a set of notes taken in Bob McKay’s criminal law course (files 4 and 5). I have included several marked-up texts used as a student, including my international law casebook, the subject that was to be the subject of my graduate studies (file 7). (For a description of why I chose criminal law for my graduate work, see my speech to the Cambridge Boat-Race dinner in box 04, file 42). As I apparently tossed out most of my notes when we went to England in 1960, there is also very little from my articling year and the bar admission course. What has survived is one incorporation I did and a number of cases I argued for the firm of Kimber and Dubin and some legal aid criminal cases that I took on my own (files 8-10). Some of these cases were sensational enough to be covered in the yellow journals of the day, in Hush, Justice Weekly, and Tab.

Similarly, there are very few documents relating to my four years teaching at Osgoode Hall Law School from 1961-1965 (file 11). Research notes and documents relating to the Osgoode years can, however, be found in a number of other boxes, such as those relating to Detention before Trial, Securities Regulation, and Double Jeopardy.

I was appointed to the University of Toronto Faculty of Law commencing on July 1, 1965 (file 12). From that period on there is more material. The files, for example, contain some material on the Law School’s Research Committee and its Long Range Planning Committee, as well as various other memos (files 13-15).

In 1972 I was appointed as the dean and returned from my year as a Law Reform of Canada Commissioner in Ottawa (files 16-20). The files contain a fair amount of correspondence while still in Ottawa relating to the deanship (file 21). There are also various law school plans and speeches made while dean (file 22).

The many files connected with my seven years as dean between 1972 and 1979 will be found in the normal law school files. I did not go through the files to keep any law school records when my term of office was over. There is, however, a fairly lengthy interview done for the student Advocate (file 23). There are also a number of files dealing with student mooting while I was dean which were not part of the law school records but were given to me by some students a number of years later (possibly in the early 1980s) because they didn’t know what to do with them (files 41-44).

In 1975 I started making brief notes of my plans for the coming year (file 24) and kept this up until the present. I usually did these around Labour Day. From about 1980 on I also prepared, as we were required to do, annual reports to the dean on my moonlighting and other activities for the past year (file 27).

Correspondence from 1980 on not found in other boxes is contained in files 28-36. The files also contain material on other aspects of law school life, such as my chairmanship of the Directed Research Committee (files 37 and 38), my involvement as faculty advisor to the Faculty of Law Review (file 40), my membership in the graduate committee (file 48), and my involvement in seeking special salary increases for the faculty (file 39). None of these files is very complete, however. There are also files on my involvement in the law school annual squash tournament, various alumni events, and various talks I gave at the law school (files 45,47, and 51). Other files deal with various sabbatical plans, various media appearances, and ways in which I coped with the changing technology, including the use of the computer (files 46, 49, and 53). A number of law school pictures are contained in file 50.

Publication matters

Professor Friedland notes in his “Introduction” that this series “describes the process of publication and includes such issues as selecting pictures, working out the website for the notes, choosing a cover, plans for promotion of the book, preparing the index, and other matters connected with the publication of the book.”

Sub-series 5.3 is the largest by far and contains the correspondence and related files documenting the selection process for photographs. Sub-series 5.1 contains correspondence, documents, and memoranda relating to publication matters generally, readers’ reports, cover design, book orders, and events leading up to and the book launch itself. Sub-series 5.2, “endmatters”, is devoted primarily to issues relating to the bibliography and the index. Sub-series 5.4, “webnotes”, documents the issues and problems associated with putting all the footnotes on the Internet, the first time this was attempted by the publisher, the University of Toronto Press. Other files relating to webnotes may be found in Series 3, Sub-series 5.

Friedland 2008 accession

Further personal records of Martin Friedland, Professor Emeritus of Law, consisting of correspondence, certificates, appointment books, notes, teaching material and lecture notes, research notes, publications, minutes of meeting, photographs, and other material relating to personal and family activities, Faculty of Law and other University of Toronto activities; the promotion of his "University of Toronto: a history", the writing of an unpublished manuscript, his memoirs and a number of articles; his work as a consultant to government organizations and inquiries; and other professional activities, including the University of Toronto Press and the Osgoode Society.

Personal

These boxes contain personal materials relating to my early years, my undergraduate years, various correspondence from and to family members and others, materials relating to the immediate family, files involving homes and other property that we owned, my income tax returns, other financial matters, and assorted other files.

There is relatively little material relating to my early years, including my high school years (files 3 and 4). I saved very little of that material. Similarly there is very little with respect to my University undergraduate years (files 5-16). There are no files relating to courses in Commerce and Finance (file 7). There are a few scattered things involving the university fraternity, the University College Literary and Athletic Society (UC “Lit”), U of T athletics, Hart House, and the Historical Club (files 6-13). A few postcards and letters and newspapers relate to the World University Service (WUS) trip to West Africa in the summer of 1955 and the many trips thumbing through the states while an undergraduate and law student (files 14 and 15). Material relating to my time at law school is contained in the “Law School” sub-series in Series 4.

I have included correspondence and other documents involving our children and the immediate family (files 17-27) and letters received from Judy’s and my folks while we were in Israel (files 28-30). Letters relating to our times in Cambridge are found in the boxes on Double Jeopardy and Law Reform (Series 5).

There are files relating to the purchase and sale of 169 Hillsdale, our first house, and the purchase and rentals while away of 77 Belsize Drive, our second house (files 31-38). There is also a file on the purchase and sale of property in Barrie, Ontario (file 39). I have not included at this time the material that I have on the purchase from Dean WPM Kennedy’s son, Frere, in 1983 of the Kennedy property in Kearney, Ontario, where our summer place is.

I have included a file relating to the estates of Ben and Sarah Garfield, Judy’s uncle and aunt, of which I was an executor (file 48). There are also other financial matters in the files, particularly my income tax returns for the years 1963-1992 (files 50 and 52-57).

Other miscellaneous files include records of the Public Lending Rights scheme (file 41), a Cambridge Boat Race Dinner speech that I gave in 1990 (file 42), some correspondence with Jewish groups (file 43), and various who’s who entries (file 40).

Martin Lawrence Friedland fonds

  • UTA 1294
  • Fonds
  • 1868-2015

Fonds consists of five accessions of records documenting the life of Martin L. Friedland, as a student, professor of law and administrator at the University of Toronto; as an expert on legal matters and a contributor to the formation of public policy at the provincial and federal levels; and as an author of sixteen books and numerous articles, in particular the researching and writing of his book "University of Toronto: A history (University of Toronto Press, 2002 & 2013).

See accession-level descriptions for further details.

Friedland, Martin Lawrence