Showing 407 results

Archival description
Series
Print preview View:

Photographs

Panoramic photograph taken on the balcony of Tienamen Square, Beijing, China, 1 May 1962. Dr. Bissell is on the left of the rear row. Identifications on the backing of the photograph.

Ernest Buckler

This series contains extensive documentation on Claude Bissell's research and relationship with Canadian poet Ernest Buckler including a typescript and related publication letters relating to his book Ernest Buckler Remembered (University of Toronto Press, 1989).

Graphic material

This series consists of photographs related to Rodney Bobiwash's professional and personal activities. The majority of the photographs are professional in nature and document Bobiwash's participation in conferences and seminars around the world. Many of the photographs are from the late 1990s and early 2000s when Bobiwash was working for the Center for World Indigenous Studies. Many photographs in series 10 are related to other series in the accession; see the notes section in series 1-9 for related photographs. The photographs are arranged in alphabetical order, except for box /004P, which is arranged chronologically.

National Research Council

Series contains is composed of records dating from McKay’s time at the National Research Council. During the Second World War, the organization was mobilized to support the Allied war effort. As a result, most of the series’ records relate to military research and development. Canadian Army Operational Research Group (C.A.O.R.G.) reports compose approximately half the files that make up the series. These reports cover subjects ranging from blast measurements for anti-tank mine clearance to the number and distribution of Japanese paper balloons in North America. There are also two summary reports on Japanese balloon incidents.
The remainder of the textual and graphic records are made up of committee minutes, general Department of Defence documents, and a short paper on Canada’s part in the development of the radio proximity fuse, which McKay contributed to as assistant to project leader Professor Arnold Pitt.

Also included in this series are the remains of a Japanese paper balloon. Paper balloons, also known as balloon bombs, were a by-product of an atmospheric experiment by Axis scientists, which discovered a powerful air current traveling across the Pacific at about 30,000 feet [1]. Taking advantage of this knowledge, the Japanese military developed what may well have been the first intercontinental weapon in the form of explosive devices attached to paper balloons. These balloons were released in Japan and carried along the Pacific by a jet stream, ultimately finding their way to North America’s West Coast. Although the Japanese are thought to have released as many as 9,000 paper balloons, only 1,000 or so are thought to have reached North America, resulting in a total of six casualties [2].

NOTES

  1. Johnna Rizzo, “Japan’s secret WWII weapon: Balloon bombs,” National Geographic, 27 May 2013.
  2. Ibid.

Addresses and public lectures

Dr. Glass was much sought after as a public lecturer and gave freely of his time. Most of the addresses relate to his professional work, but he also took time to share his private passions, especially the utilization of geothermal energy and his research on the Jews in China. The last arose from his invitations to visit China in 1980 and 1985, where he was awarded an honorary professorship from the prestigious Nanjing Aeronautical Institute.

The files contain drafts of addresses, covering correspondence, notes, programs, press coverage, photoprints and slides.

External professional activities

For most of his active career, Dr. Baker was involved with organizations related to his specialty in paediatrics and later native health. This series contains files documenting his involvement with the Canadian Paediatric Society including his chairmanship of the Indian and Inuit Health Committee. These files include minutes of meetings, drafts of papers, notes and correspondence. Also included are files on the Council of Faculties of Medicine of Ontario and the Northern Ontario Committee which he chaired from 1992 to 1997. There is also one file of the Canadian Psychiatric Association relating to a meeting in September 1989.

Student activities

Personal correspondence with friends and University officials, brochures, flyers, pamphlets, and reports relating to courses in Caribbean studies created and collected during Mr. Pieters undergraduate years (B.A. Political Science, 1993) at New College. Also included is a file on New College Alumni Association containing copies of reports, etc relating to the provostial review of the college, 1996. This series also includes photos documenting his activities as a student including social events, meetings, dinners and his graduation.

Future Teachers Club

The Future Teachers Club is an initiative of the Faculty of Education to encourage African/Canadian students in elementary and secondary schools to consider teaching as a career. The objective is to increase the number of African/Canadian teachers in the classrooms to a level which is reasonably representative of African/Canadians in relation to European/Canadians, Asian/Canadians and Aboriginal/Canadians in the provincial population.

This series consists of correspondence, reports, minutes of meetings, survey forms and results, brochures, and flyers collected by Mr Pieters as an active participant in this club while a student at the Faculty of Education. Also included are records relating to "Promoting equity for the teachers of tomorrow" (PETT), a program "undertaken to encourage students from African Canadian and Portuguese communities to consider teaching as a career. There is also a photo album showing Pieters practice teaching at a local school.

Exhibition files

Files relating to the mounting of exhibits by faculty and students, most notably Connaitre/Reconnaitre Le Corbusier exhibit in 1987 and Restatements and Realizations: Built work of graduates of the School since 1893, put together by van Ginkel as part of the Centenary Celebrations.

The general administrative files around borrowing, lending and mounting exhibits are filed at the beginning of this series, followed by the specific administrative files on the above mentioned exhibits. Finally, files relating to exhibits borrowed and mounted at the Faculty's gallery are arranged in chronological order.

This series contains photographs, negatives and slides documenting the mounting of exhibits in the Faculty of Architecture including the 1983 exhibit on Le Corbusier and the school's centenary exhibit "Restatement and Realizations: Built work of graduates of the School since 1893". All photographs, slides and negatives have been removed, placed in their own files and boxed separately. In such cases, a SEPARATION NOTICE has been inserted to indicate the existence of graphic materials.

Correspondence

This series includes some professional correspondence but much of it consists of letters to and from Dr. Hastings’ parents, his grandmother, his aunts, Bessie Ferguson, Betty Graham and Louise Hastings, and other relatives and friends met over a lifetime of public service and devotion to his church. The last influenced many of his interests outside his academic and administrative work at University of Toronto, and is reflected in thirty years of correspondence arising from visits to India and Japan beginning in the early 1950s.

While most of the correspondence is filed chronologically, the first files contain exchanges of letters with the Drever family (especially Michael Drever), the politician Eugene Forsey, and the relatives mentioned above. Dr. Hastings met the Drevers from Montevideo, Uruguay, in 1959, when he went on a tour of Latin America to observe preventive medicine and public health teaching. He was to return to Uruguay at the end of 1964 as a member of the World Health Organization/Pan American Health Organization program on health planning in Latin America that also entailed visits to Chile and Argentina (he had a regular correspondent from Santiago after that date).

Dr. Hastings first went to India in 1953 as the University of Toronto’s representative to the World University Service International Seminar (the files for which are in Series 5). While there he first visited the Christian Medical College and Hospital in Vellore, near Madras, that received support from the Canadian Council of Churches through its Vellore/Ludhiana Committee, of which he was a member from 1962 to 1975 and to which he was an advisor from 1975 to 1981. Over the years Dr. Hasting was to provide financial support to many young people he met in India, helping some with their education overseas and others to immigrate to Canada. In 1955 he had the opportunity to go abroad again, this time as a faculty member of the WUS International Seminar, Japan, followed by a month for studying medical education and medical care in that country. He wrote a widely praised report on his return, and kept up a voluminous correspondence with many of the people he had met. In later years Dr. Hastings came to regard these two visits as seminal events in his life.

The first files of chronological correspondence is primarily with his parents, consisting largely of letters sent and received while at Camp Kagawong on Balsam Lake near Fenelon Falls, Ontario where Hastings was to spend many summers from about 1937 and where he was sometime counsellor and a director. (Correspondence from his vacation trips to Quebec in 1943 and 1946 is filed in Series 1). From 1953 and his visit to India, the chronological arrangement is divided in each year into the following categories: general, parents (later ‘mother’, India and (from 1955) Japan.

The volume of correspondence tails off in the mid-1970s; one file covers the years 1986-1997.

Other activities

The records in this series underscore the impact of an upbringing where the tenets of Christianity, public service, and duty were emphasized. They begin with thirty years (1937-1969) of files on Camp Kagawong, a privately owned boy’s camp on Balsam Lake, where Dr. Hastings spent his summers as a young boy enjoying the outdoors. The leadership qualities he displayed led to his becoming a camp counsellor (1944-1945) and, from 1946-1950, director of the Bantam Section and instructor in nature, first aid, swimming and games. During those years he dramatized three folk tales for presentation. At the weekly chapel services, he often delivered homilies or ‘sermonettes’, a practice he continued throughout his association with the camp that closed in 1975. Dr. Hastings’ activities at Camp Kagawong are well documented through notes, certificates, correspondence (much of which is in Series 3) scripts for theatrical presentations, chapel service programs and sermonettes, and some of the annual camp catalogues, photographs and artifacts. The arrangement of the files is largely chronological.

The material on Camp Kagawong is followed by files on Canadian Council of Churches and its Vellore/Ludhiana Committee, of which Dr. Hastings was a member from 1962-1975 and to which he was an advisor from 1975 to 1981. These are followed by files on the Christian Medical College in Vellore, India, including extensive ones documenting the work of the international review team that visited Vellore in 1979 and produced a report on its findings in 1980.

Next are files on the coronation of Queen Elizabeth in 1953; the Developing Countries Farm Radio Network, of which Dr. Hastings was a member of the board; Emmanuel College, where he was a University representative on its council and a member of its curriculum committee; the King’s College Fund which in 1985 organized a Canadian study tour of health services in Britain; and on Pickering College in Newmarket, Ontario. A member of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada, Dr. Hastings was active in its youth clubs in the 1940s. He attended the 1948 convention at which George Drew was selected leader and took part in the federal election the following year.

Dr. Hastings’ place of worship for many years was St. Andrew’s United Church at 117 Bloor Street East in Toronto. He played a very active role in its affairs, serving on its board, many of its committees, was a member of its Men’s Club and, on occasion, delivered the sermon of the week. The files cover the years from 1952 to 1973, when St. Andrew’s and the Yonge Street United Church amalgamated and include correspondence, notices of services, minutes of meetings, reports, and drafts of three sermons.

This series ends with a number of files on Dr. Hastings’ involvement in several activities of the United Church of Canada, centring around his being a member of its task force on health services (1985-1987) and its Division of Mission in Canada’s health task group (1991-1994). Included are correspondence, minutes, memoranda, notes, drafts of reports, and a video, “Taking the pulse of Canadian health care” that grew out of the work of the health task group.

Graphic material

Includes images documenting machinery for induction heating at the Ajax Magnethermic Corporation and views of other plants and machinery such as Davey United of Sheffield England and Washington Steel. A series of slides document research-taking place in the University of Toronto, Electronic Engineering Department in 1966. There are a few views of Biringer at work.

Graphic material

Photographs document members of the Blake and Wrong families including Samuel H. Blake and his wife Rebecca Blake, Edward Blake and Gerald Blake, as well as cousins Murray, Hume and Harold Wrong. Most are studio portraits, some of which are unidentified. There is one album depicting life at the summer residences Point au Pic and Murray Bay.

Photographs

Photographs include a portrait of Prof French from 1990, several images of experimental equipment at UTIAS, a group shot of participants of a course on molecular beam methods at the New Hampton School (1965) and contact prints from the opening of the new wing at UTIAS in 1989.

Hart House Theatre

Marion Walker was Production Assistant at Hart House Theatre from 1946 to 1957. Under the directorship of Robert Gill, she designed sets and costumes for each of the Theatre’s annual four plays. Her first production was St. Joan, starring Charmian King. Other early performers who worked with Ms. Walker at Hart House Theatre included Kate Reid, Donald Sutherland, and William Hutt.

The records in this series pertain to Ms. Walker’s involvement with Hart House Theatre. Textual records include scripts 1946, annotated Hart House Theatre programmes 1946 – 1957, and obituaries for Robert Gill, 1974.

Series also includes approximately 100 photographs of various productions for which Ms. Walker designed costumes and sets. The photographs depict various scenes, actors and set designs. Productions represented are: Romeo and Juliet, 1947; Julius Caesar, 1948; the Seagull, 1948; The Skin of Our Teeth, 1948, The Doctor’s Dilemma, 1948; Crime and Punishment, 1949; Othello, 1949; Fortune My Foe, 1950; The Guardsman, 1950; Captain Brassbound’s Conversion, 1950; Medea, 1950; Henry IV, 1950; Marco Millions, 1950; Richard II, 1951; Pygmalion, 1951; The Madwoman of Chaillot, 1951; The Admirable Crichton, 1952; The Winslow Boy, 1952; Macbeth, 1952; The Wild Duck, 1953; The School for Wives, 1956; and The Innocent, 1957.

Series also contains 8 sketchbooks of costume designs for the following Hart House productions: The Internal Machine, 1946; Othello, 1949; Medea, 1950; Richard II, 1951; School for Wives, 1956; Hamlet, [n.d.]; and King Lear, [n.d.].

Photographs

Photographs of Dr. Rhodes at various professional meetings and functions. There are also several portraits of Dr. Rhodes in his office and at his desk as well as passport shots of himself and his wife Harriette.

Research files – Other projects

The principal research project in this series is described by Ms Winearls as “The mapping of western North America in the 19th century with particular reference to the De Fonte fantasy and the earlier ‘Sea of the West’ fantasy”. (The maps showed purported water routes between the west coast
and the Northwest Passage or the central North American plains.) This project was begun in the early 1990s but not completed as planned and led to an article on one particular map, “Thomas Jefferys Map of Canada and the mapping of the western part of North America, 1750-1768’, that appeared in 1996. The second research project is on carto-bibliographic analysis and methodology re 18th century printed maps of North America [1].

The series begins with map bibliography & notes, consisting of preliminary bibliographic entries for Mer de l’Ouest/Riviere Longue de l’Ouest, and an early draft of a bibliography of maps relating to the De Fonte fantasy, followed by files of maps arranged by area: World, Arctic, Western hemisphere, North America, and Canada. There are also source files with notes, correspondence, and copies of documents, maps and other source material, covering De Fonte, early Canadian maps, and archival sources in British Columbia, the United States and Europe. Much of the photocopied material that has been retained is annotated. These files are followed by research notes and correspondence on Northwest-De Fonte and biographical sources, and on related maps, along with requests for microform and maps. Included are reproductive copies of maps and other copies.

The files for the research project on carto-bibliographic analysis and methodology re 18th century printed maps of North America include sample entries, copies of maps and published bibliographies and sources (largely annotated), along with bibliographical analyses and North American maps sources for analysis. Some oversized maps are included.

The series ends with Ms Winearls’ research on book illustration in Canada for the History of the Book in Canada project. Three volumes were planned under the general editorship of Patricia Lockhart Fleming and Yvan Lamonde, and they appeared between 2004 and 2007. Ms Winearls’ contribution was to the first volume. The files contain correspondence, contracts, notes, and source material. Drafts of the manuscript are in Series 8.

B2016-0009 contains research Ms Winearls did on Canadian bird artist J. Fenwick Lansdowne from 2000-2013. Included are original photographs of the artist, interviews, notes, compiled bibliography and exhibition list. There is also collected photocopies of ephemera relating to the artist, reviews of his works and exhibition catalogues. Finally, Winearls collected copies of correspondence and contracts between Lansdowne and his agent Bud Feheley (restricted to 2026).

NOTES

[1] The descriptive portion of this series is drawn largely from notes provided by Ms Winearls in a container list she provided to the compiler of this inventory.

Manuscripts and publications

Ms Winearls has published widely on maps and map librarianship, beginning in 1967. This series consists of book reviews, articles, directories, exhibition catalogues, and chapters in books. A file in this series may contain draft of a manuscript, along with notes, covering correspondence, and reviews. The arrangement is chronological by date of publication.

Very few of Ms Winearls publications are missing from this series. The files relating to the writing of her major bibliographic work, Mapping Upper Canada, 1780-1867, are in Series 9. Files relating to Editing Early and Historical Atlases are found with the Conference on Editorial Problems files in Series 4.

A poster advertising the book, Ontario’s History in Maps (1984), which contains a cartobibliographic essay by Ms Winearls, “Sources for early maps in Ontario,” has been removed from B1998-0013/002(21) to /002(29).

Visits and interviews

Ms. Heaton followed up the questionnaire with visits and interviews to selected medical libraries in Canada and the United States. This series consists of correspondence and notes concerning these interviews. Also included are 28 photographs of libraries visited.

Scholarly papers

In addition to published works, Prof. Richardson made numerous presentations at conferences, symposia, invited lectures, memorials, convocations, and other occasions. The papers contained in this series were, for the most part, prepared for academic and other scholarly activities such as meetings of associations like the Society for Biblical Literature, Canadian Society of Biblical Studies, Canadian Society for the Study of Religion and the SNTS and represent a significant portion of Prof. Richardson’s body of work. Other presentations were made at many Canadian universities as invited lecturer and to various groups at the University of Toronto. A few files contain papers submitted, but never published. Indeed, many of these presentations are on topics that formed the basis of future publications. Researchers are therefore referred to Series 10 for topics of written works not represented in this series.

Files may contain correspondence, manuscripts, and notes.

Audio-visual materials

Series consists of photographs of members and staff of the New Catholic Times, including negatives and contact prints, and a sound recording of a talk given by Monika Hellwig, LL.B., Ph.D., on Catholic Education. Photographs depict members, staff, and guests of the New Catholic Times working or posing at their desk, in meetings, or attending events including conferences or presentations, a picnic, a party, and a peace demonstration. A list of items is available.

Research, publications and presentations

Series consists of records related to Joan and Frederick Winter’s archaeological research, particularly their study of Pausauias’ travels. Material includes typescripts, background research material, and images. In addition to a published article, a significant portion of the material documents the presentation of the couple’s research through scripts, a ‘photographic companion’ (annotated) album, and slides.

Bible Project

Series consists of records relating to the Bible project of Peter Brieger and Jürgen Paul. The original idea of the project was to compile a complete collection of photographs of French and English illustrated Bibles produced between the end of the eleventh century and around the year 1270, with a focus on the iconography of their illustrations. The project likely began in the late 1950s. In 1965, Dr. Brieger met Dr. Jürgen Paul, who moved to Toronto, from Germany, in 1967 to help Dr. Brieger finish the book.

Dr. Paul helped define the focus of the book, from a multi-volume corpus of all illustrations, to a study of “questions of iconography, the variety and development in the choice of subjects for illustrating the biblical books, and to concentrate on the Old Testament. It was to be demonstrated how over the period of the two centuries changes in subjects of illustration selected were influenced by changes in Christian theological exegesis of the Old Testament.” [1] The pair worked together in an office in Sydney Smith Hall during the winter and spring of 1967/68.

The pair later organized trips to several repositories to examine manuscripts. As Dr. Paul writes, “I had already realized that the material of French and English illustrated Bible manuscripts was still incomplete. Therefore, during the summer of 1968 we, together with Mrs. Brieger, spent several weeks in England checking the college libraries in Oxford and Cambridge. It turned out that in both universities large numbers of most interesting Bible manuscripts existed that were not even registered. No catalogues existed. After the stay in England we went by car through France checking the manuscript collections in Paris and provincial libraries between Avranches and Dijon. After that, we went to Italy checking the manuscripts in the Vatican library and in Laurenziana in Florence.”

When Dr. Brieger’s health began to fail, Dr. Paul continued the project, to a lesser degree, with Ann Hilty. The project was never published.


[1] From an account written by Dr. Paul. The full account can be found in the case file for B2016-0007.

Biographical and personal

This series contains passports, daily agendas (58 volumes) and an address book, as well as files relating to the Banff School of Fine Arts, Professor Peers’ academic life, awards that he received and books that he wrote. Also included are a class photograph of the East Coulee School where Peers taught and was principal from 1939-1942, personal correspondence, photographs of Peers with friends, travel documents and records relating to his 90th birthday and the memorial service held upon his death. The series concludes with a file of records relating to David Rayside, a U of T professor and close friend of Peers.

The “biographical information” file [/003(04)] contains, amongst many other items, several pieces that Professor Peers himself penned between 1980 and 2002 about his family and background and his years as a high school teacher. Included with this is a CD from one of his nieces, Bev Swanton, titled “Acadia Valley Homecoming 2012”, that celebrates the hamlet, the surrounding farms (including that of the Peers family) and includes the centennial parade.

University of Toronto

This series contains records relating to Professor Peers’ activities as a professor and professor emeritus, as an alumnus, and as a very generous donor to the University of Toronto and also to Queen’s University. Included is general information about his retirement, correspondence and related material regarding the Department of Political Science. There are also extensive files of correspondence, donor agreements, endowment reports, and other material regarding scholarships and fellowships that he funded in the Department of Political Science and elsewhere, and a file on the purchase of and later transfer to the University of Toronto of his condominium at 190 St. George St.

Patient files

This series contains a selection of MacIntosh’s patient files from several medical practices – the Toronto General Hospital, the Princess Margaret Hospital, Sunnybrook Hospital and the Hart House Clinic for student athletes at the University of Toronto. Included in this series are patient files for MacIntosh’s own practice at the University of Toronto’s Medical Arts Building as well as patient files and case information for the many litigations and Workers Compensation Board/Workplace Safety Insurance Board cases for which MacIntosh served as an expert medical consultant. Lastly, included in this series are a set of patient files from Drs. Allan Gross and John C. Cameron, two younger doctors who worked in the orthopedic field with MacIntosh.

Most of the files in this series contain patient intake information, background medical charts, diagnoses, treatment plans and follow-up reports. Occasionally, the patient files will include photographs and x-rays. The series is arranged in order to reflect how MacIntosh kept his patient files under several different systems. MacIntosh arranged some of his patient files based on the injury or affliction facing the patient. Other files were arranged alphabetically, and many were arranged using a numbered system. The patient files belonging to patients seen at the Hart House Clinic were also kept separately by MacIntosh.

The series also includes several different sets of patient indices, which are presumably index cards for every patient MacIntosh treated. Most of the indices are alphabetical or chronological, however there are several miscellaneous or misfiled boxes are patient index cards.

Education

Robert Spencer received his elementary, high school, and undergraduate education in Montreal, at Kensington School, the High School of Montreal, and McGill University respectively. The files relating to these stages of Professor Spencer’s education contain correspondence, report cards and certificates, term papers, programmes for student dinners and graduation ceremonies, short stories, student newspapers and yearbooks, flyers and other material relating to student organizations, and social activities.
The basic arrangement is by the institutions that Professor Spencer attended, with some files on teacher training during and after his undergraduate years at McGill.

Professor Spencer was on military service in Europe from 1942 to 1946. Once back in Canada, he decided to undertake post-graduate work in history. C.P. Stacey, Director of the Historical Section of the General Staff at Canadian Military Headquarters in London, England, for which Spencer had been working since the beginning of 1946 under the direction of Eric Harrison, could not find funds to assist him. Harrison, who in civil life was a professor of history at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, supported Spencer’s applications for scholarships; he was successful in getting the James C. Cumming Fellowship from Trinity College in the University of Toronto. From 1946 to 1950, he also received ‘university training” funds from the Department of Veterans Affairs. Spencer spent a year (1946-1947) at the U of T, studying under Professors Ralph Flenley and G.P. de T. Glazebrook and reading widely. His MA thesis, “History of the Fifteenth Canadian Field Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery, 1941-1945”, was essentially the study he had written while with the Canadian Forces in the Netherlands in 1945; 1,000 copies of which had been printed by Elsevier in Amsterdam.

Following his graduation from the University of Toronto, Spencer applied to study modern history at Oxford University and was accepted by St. John’s College. He received funding from McGill University (Moyse Travelling Fellowship worth $350), the Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire (Overseas Scholarship, $800), and part (₤30) of a scholarship from the British Council. In September, 1947 he sailed on the Queen Mary to Southampton. He studied under W. Norton Medlicott and A.J.P. Taylor, receiving his B.Litt in 1950. He was then accepted to do a Doctor of Philosophy.

The files relating to his graduate studies contain correspondence, official documents, essays, programmes, flyers, press clippings, booklets relating to Oxford, St. John’s College, and the Bodleian Library, greeting cards and other souvenirs of his time at Oxford.

Professional associations and conferences

This series consists of files on organizations, conferences, symposia and workshops, arranged alphabetically. The most thoroughly documented ones are those in which Professor McLeod was involved in an organizational or executive capacity. The earliest files document his involvement in multicultural issues in Saskatchewan, specifically problems associated with language instruction in French. They contain correspondence, notes, briefs submitted to the Royal Commission on Bilingualism and Biculturalism and to the Saskatchewan Committee on Instruction in Languages other than English, associated
reports, and a seminar on bilingual education (1964-1966). Later, in Ontario, his overlapping duties as chair of the Ontario Multicultural Education Conference Committee (1980-1983) and president of the Canadian Council for Multicultural and Intercultural Education (1981-1985), for example, enabled him to play a central role in organizing the early national conferences on multicultural education. He organized and chaired two colloquiums on “Multiculturalism – Teaching and Learning”, sponsored by FEUT (1990, 1991), and was a co-organizer of the International Colloquium on Ethnicity, Conflict and Cooperation held in Moscow in 1992. McLeod also attended a number of international conferences as a Canadian representative. These include four (1977-1987) world congresses of the Comparative and International Education Association, and the Circumpolar Conference of Indigenous People in Iceland (1993).

McLeod was involved in an executive capacity in many organizations, the files for which contain the correspondence, notes and memoranda, minutes and reports that reveal the extent of his involvement. The principal bodies, for which there is extensive documentation, are the Canadian Association for Second Language Teachers (CASALT), Canadian Ethnic Studies Association (CESA), Canadian Council for Multicultural and Intercultural Education (CCMIE), Canadian History of Education Association (CHEA), Multicultural Health Coalition (MHC), the Multiculturalism and Aging Seniors Coordinating Committee (MASCC), and the Ontario Multicultural Association (OMAMO). He was also frequently asked to advise governments on policy. He gave, for example, evidence to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Multiculturalism and served on the Ontario Advisory Committee on Multiculturalism.

Photographs

This series consists of personal photographs of Mary O'Brien with her partner Cath McNaughton, friends, and colleagues. Includes early photographs of O'Brien as a nurse in Scotland and Montreal, two photographs of O'Brien at the Annual Conference of the UK Labour Party in October 1956, O'Brien receiving the City of Toronto's Constance E. Hamilton award in 1982. Also included are professional portraits of O'Brien taken for her books and a 1985 interview with the Kingston Whig-Standard.

Personal/biographical

This series contains material relating to Prof. York’s life. It includes a curriculum vitae from 1998 and a copy of the U of T National Report on Derek York and his work with laser probe argon-argon dating.

Photographs

Series consists of images of Prof. Venkatacharya and his colleagues, in addition to family portraits. Images cover multiple trips to India, including to Srisailam, the presentation of Prof. Venkatacharya’s honorary degree at Rashtriya Sanskrit Vidyapeetha, as well as formal portraits of Tuppil and Vijaya Venkatacharya.

Education

Omond Solandt attended Mulvey School in Winnipeg from 1915 to November 1920, when his family moved to Toronto. He then attended Rosedale Junior Public School, transferring to Central Technical School in 1922. For his last year of high school he attended Jarvis Collegiate.

He enrolled at the University of Toronto in 1927, as an undergraduate at Victoria College. He graduated with a BA in 1931 with first class honours in biological and medical sciences. Omond

Atomic bomb

In September, 1945 the British Chiefs of Staff were invited by their American counterparts to send a mission to Japan to study the effects of the atomic bomb. Omond Solandt was loaned to the Scientific Advisor to the Army Council in the War Office to go as his representative. He went as a specialist in damage to military installations but, there being none of significance in Hiroshima or Nagasaki, spent most of his time studying the casualties from a medical perspective.

This series includes Dr. Solandt

Operational research

Dr. Solandt was one of the pioneers in operational research, a new sphere of scientific activity which arose from the particular wartime requirements for solutions to complex questions, some highly technical, and most involving the interaction between men and machines. By 1944 Solandt had become head of the British Army

Canadian National Railways

In the latter months of 1955, Omond Solandt began arranging his departure from the Defence Research Board to take up the position of Vice-President, Research and Development of Canadian National Railways, a position he held from 1 March, 1956 to 1 July, 1963.

This series contains correspondence, addresses, press clippings, reports, articles and photoprints (see Series 46) relating largely to the scientific research carried out by the Research and Development Department.

Electric Reduction Company of Canada Ltd.

From de Havilland, Dr. Solandt moved on to the position of Vice-Chair of the Electric Reduction Company of Canada (later ERCO), a subsidiary of Allbright & Wilson Ltd. of England, which he held from 1965 until 31 December, 1970.

This series contains correspondence, press clippings, articles, minutes, memoranda, reports, and photoprints.

Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical/International Centre for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT)

The Centro Internactional de Agricultura Tropical was founded by the Rockefeller Institute in 1967 in Cali, Columbia. In 1982 a massive fraud was discovered within the organization, with the result that the World Bank in 1984 retained Omond Solandt to conduct a management review of the Centre.

The files in this series provide a good picture of the conduct of the External Management Review and of its results. Included are the Review Team

West African Rice Development Association (WARDA)

The initial aim of WARDA was to have an entirely native West African organization that would apply the latest in rice technology to the problems peculiar to their area, but political interference meant that WARDA never functioned effectively. By the end of 1986, with CGIAR having resolved to continue its support of the organization, Omond Solandt was asked to coach those involved in it on how to operate within a CG style of centre. In 1987 he made three trips to Africa and, while there and in subsequent meetings, worked to ensure that an effective structure and Board were put in place. His official involvement with WARDA ended about August, 1987.

The correspondence, minutes, background papers, reports, photographs and publications provide detailed information about the problems WARDA faced and the problems Solandt and others encountered in resolving them.

Research files (general)

This series consists of the general files that Mr. Grenville assembled in his attempt to write Dr. Solandt’s story. It begins with a variety of biographical information on Dr. Solandt, including curriculum vitae, tributes and obituaries, his memorial service, press clippings, and an article about him. This is followed by grant applications, a project outline, correspondence, and files on sources, family history, and Dr. Solandt’s activities (including summaries of diaries), arranged alphabetically. The principal areas of activity covered are the atomic bomb/nuclear weapons, Canadian National Railway, Defence Research Board, forestry, medical research, operational research, the Science Council of Canada, and ‘voyaguers’. The photographs associated with some of the files have been removed and stored separately.

Addresses

Professor Franceschetti has given many public lectures and delivered many papers at conferences and seminars. Some of the latter were published and readers may want to check Series 6 for them. Additional correspondence about addresses may be found in Series 2. Only about a third of the addresses listed in Professor Franceschetti’s last curriculum vitae (April 2004) are found in this series. The files may contain any or all of the following: notices of and posters for addresses (for oversized ones, see B2009-0039/015), covering correspondence, programmes, notes for and drafts of the addresses, and posters.

Conferences, Talks, Unpublished Papers

Records in this series include notes, drafts, correspondence and flyers related to conferences Professor Rayside attended and/or participated in, unpublished talks and workshops, and unpublished papers, as well as less formal writing. The conferences documented mostly pertain to equity issues faced by gay and lesbian populations. The talks and workshops relate to a variety of topics including political science, labour unions, gendered violence, philanthropy and diversity in the workplace and were delivered mostly at Canadian universities in the form of symposia, guest lectures and public lectures. The unpublished papers in this series relate mainly to equity issues in Canadian and American society. There is also one sound recording of Professor Rayside delivering the Kreeft Lecture on November 28, 2002.

Records in B2017-0024 included talks, panels, and conferences on subjects such as inclusion, religion in the public sphere and positive space. There is also a paper he gave at Spring Reunion in 2016 as well as a memorial for colleagues Stephen Clarkson and David Higgs.

Administrative resources files

Series consists of administrative resources files which were maintained for Nouwen by Nouwen's administrative staffs from 1983 to 1997. These files contain materials collected by Nouwen in order to assist him with his roles as pastor, writer, researcher, and friend. In addition to subject-based material such as newspaper clippings and brochures, it is evident that Nouwen's administrative assistants at Daybreak used these files to hold administrative material related to liturgical events such as Christmas, Lent, and Easter, as well as other aspects of Nouwen's duties in the community. These files were likely maintained as a resource for Nouwen regarding his daily work.

The titles of the files are taken directly from the file labels created by Nouwen and his administrative assistants, unless otherwise noted. The files are arranged by subject or topic (such as Latin America, Vincent van Gogh, or Abbey of the Genesee), are in alphabetical order, and materials within the files have been maintained chronologically. Many of the materials have been placed in this series because they contain annotations, either by Nouwen or an assistant, saying "File" with the subject or name or "File - Resource files."

Results 1 to 50 of 407