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Early family life and letters

Subseries consists of records documenting Dr. Franklin’s family and early life. The first file is a scrapbook on the history of the Martius family, dating back to the 15th century. The scrapbook includes a long paper, in German, on the history of the family, as well as captioned photographs and postcards. Series also includes a diary, written in German, from 1945. The bulk of the subseries consists of correspondence sent to and from Dr. Franklin, primarily after she moved to Canada. There are many letters between Dr. Franklin and her family in Germany, as well as letters to friends and colleagues.

The subseries concludes with records documenting Dr. Franklin’s attempts to sponsor her mother’s immigration to Canada in 1949.

Photographs

Subseries consists of various portraits taken of Dr. Franklin, including photographs of her sitting at her microscope. Subseries also includes a couple family photos.

Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples

In 1992, the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples, co-chaired by Judge René Dussault and Georges Erasmus, was established by the federal government. Prof. Russell was hired as Chair of the Research Advisory Committee and served from 1992-1995. According to the terms of reference, this Committee was to “devise and recommend a set of ethical principles to guide the conduct of research authorized” by the Royal Commission, “to provide advice on the overall design and methodological approaches of research”, and “to oversee discipline-based peer review in Political Science, Law, Economics, Anthropology/Sociology, Geography and History in addition to …peer review of Applied Studies and studies on the North”. Prof. Russell’s role is documented in correspondence, notes, newsletters, reports and manuscripts of studies. Among the studies included are “Aboriginal peoples and constitutional reform” written by Prof. Russell and Roger Jones, “Canadian governments and aboriginal peoples” governance papers for British Columbia, Nova Scotia, and Newfoundland and Labrador.

Data

This subseries includes raw data in electronic form as well as Ms. Heaton's background notes on coding, computing and analyzing raw data in the SAS program.

Quakers: Jerilynn Prior and the war tax

Subseries consists of records relating to two intertwining issues: the court case against Jerrilynn Prior (who refused to pay taxes that would fund the military) the more general issue facing conscientious objectors who must pay taxes for future wars.

The legal defence of Dr. Jerrilynn Prior was undertaken by Thomas Berger, with whom Dr. Franklin worked closely to establish the Quaker background to their conscientious objection to war and its implications on taxation during peacetime. According to Dr. Franklin, As well, and in parallel to the Jerrilynn Prior case, there were intense discussions within the Quaker community, the traditional peace churches and some lawyers and parliamentarians on the feasibility of redirecting the military portion of the income tax from conscientious objectors to designated peaceful purposes. Dr. Franklin was part of several delegations to members of the House of Commons on this issue.

Records include the legal documents by Berger, the judgments, and the responses. Records also include background material, papers and presentations, correspondence, press clippings, and parliamentary records relating to the issue of conscientious objection and efforts to introduce a Peace Bill, which would allow citizens to allocate their tax monies away from military purposes.

Voice of Women: General

Subseries consists of records relating to Dr. Franklin’s work with Voice of Women, founded in 1960 by a group of women concerned about the threat of nuclear war. Their first mass meeting was in July 1960 at Toronto’s Massey Hall. The group organized an International Peace Conference in 1962 – the first of its kind. Working alongside Muriel Duckworth, Kay Macpherson, and other leading women in the Canadian peace movement, Franklin brought her scientific experience and knowledge to bear on the work done by VOW.

Records primarily document the activities of VOW in Toronto and Ottawa, but also include coverage of Saskatchewan, New Brunswick, Regina, and Victoria.

General background records on VOW include the 1968 VOW constitution, reports, papers, newsletters, public education literature, news coverage, research, correspondence and general publications on the Canadian peace movement.

VOW submitted numerous briefs to the House of Commons and various federal commissions and committees on a wide range of issues, including military trade agreements, chemical and biological weapons, Star Wars, Canadian-American military cooperation, arms exports, disarmament, energy policy, and bilingualism and biculturalism. Records relating to these briefs, including background material, correspondence, drafts, and the final briefs, can be found in this subseries.

Other activities documented include election advocacy, public education events, peace conferences, meetings, exhibits, and organizational matters. There are also several files document VOW’s work with the Cluff Lake community, in their opposition to a proposed uranium mining development in Northern Saskatchewan in the late 1970s. Records include correspondence, testimonies, background information and news clippings.

There is also significant documentation of tension in the organization in 1962-1963 around the purpose and priorities of VOW. Records here include results from a controversial opinion poll questionnaire sent to members to gather their opinions, and significant correspondence.

Chemical and biological warfare

Subseries consists of records documenting Dr. Franklin’s concerns around chemical and biological warfare/weapons (CBW), as a scientist, a Quaker, and a member of VOW. Subseries includes background material on issues relating to the making, testing and use of chemical poisoning.

According to Dr. Franklin, both Voice of Women and some members of the scientific community were interested in clarifying Canada’s role in this area of research and development, including the role of universities. These groups were also active in public education to achieve a complete banning of research, production, testing and use of such weapons. There are several recurring issues: one is Canada’s official role in the research and testing of chemical weapons, particularly the use, on behalf of her allies, of the test station in Suffield, Alberta. Voice of Women in particular made many attempts to question the use of this large tract of land for testing highly poisonous agents. The Canadian government always responded that their work has been entirely defensive, i.e. the testing of protective clothing for soldiers who might be subjected to chemical attacks. The Canadian government has never attempted to suggest that it could protect civilians or that in fact protection was possible. The storage of small amounts of toxic gases on the grounds of Suffield was never denied, however subsequent inquiries showed that the military found it impossible to actually track down the existing location of their supplies.

Records in this subseries include background material from public sources, as well as unclassified Suffield documents. One of the strong forces in the Canadian scientific community who tried to expose research activities in Canadian universities has been Dr. Arthur Forrer of York University’s Department of Biology. He did much to assess the published papers of staff members from Suffield to ascertain their professional expertise so as to deduce the area of their classified activities.

See also: Relevant tapes can be found in Series 18 (Sound recordings), including the visit of VOW members to Suffield; an interview of Ester McCantiless by Dr. Franklin regarding work at the Suffield military base and recruitment of her students; an interview with chief of the Defence Research Board and Muriel Duckworth and Ursula Franklin; and Dr. Franklin’s recorded thoughts to Ann Gertler re the failure of the Chemical, Biological Warfare Control Workshop.

Research Board and SLOWPOKE Reactor

Subseries consists of correspondence with the Chairs of the University Research Board (1979-1983), regarding university research policy, requests for funds, and a request to Dr. Franklin to serve on a panel regarding particular research proposals.

Subseries also includes minutes from the SLOWPOKE Reactor Committee and the SLOWPOKE Subcommittee on Quality Control and Automation of Data Handling (1986).

Lawsuit

Dr. Franklin was one of a group of retired female faculty members who filed a class action lawsuit against the University of Toronto, for paying women less than men. The lawsuit was settled in 2002 and around 60 retired female faculty members received a pay equity settlement. Files in this subseries contain 2 press clippings on the lawsuit.

Research Background

The series reflects the development of a discussion surrounding the findings of Dr. Roots’ research data and notes. The material primarily consists of prints and notes but also contains drafts, papers, figures, correspondence, plate and photographic records, negatives, and notebooks.

Publishing activities

Subseries consists of records relating to Dr. Franklin’s publishing activities. Files include correspondence, requests for work, author agreements, reviews and other records relating to publishing books and articles, rather than the texts themselves.

Chinese black mirrors

Subseries consists of records relating to Dr. Franklin’s research on Chinese black mirrors. Records include data, research, micrographs, reports, papers, manuscript drafts, and correspondence.

Museum of Carthage Project

Subseries consists of records relating to Dr. Franklin’s work with the University of Toronto-Museum of Carthage Project, along with that of the project field director, Vanda Vitali. The group undertook conservation of the Punic Collection at the Museum of Carthage and public education of local Tunisians. The group also developed museum displays that highlighted the conservation work done by the museum on the artifacts exhibited. This work is documented in a film, Carthage: Witness to the Past. Records include background material, documentation of funding from CIDA, collection reviews, reports, notes, exhibition material, and a publication entitled “Salvage conservation at the Museum of Carthage: a manual for artifact conservation.” There are also some records relating to the launch of the documentary film.

Commission of Inquiry on Aluminum Wiring

Subseries consists of records relating to Dr. Franklin’s preparations for the hearings of Ontario’s Commission of Inquiry on Aluminum Wiring, at which she gave testimony. The 18-month Commission, chaired by John Tuzo Wilson, was responsible for determining whether aluminum wiring was safe for residential use. Records include background papers and publications, research notes, copies of government memos and orders-of-council, news clippings, and correspondence from John Tuzo Wilson, concerned citizens, researchers, and others investigating this issue. A later file also includes correspondence and background material relating to a 1981 court case regarding wiring.

National Research Council (NRC)

This small subseries consists of records relating to Dr. Franklin’s service as a board member of the National Research Council, and member of the Council Committee on Personnel, Committee on Grants and Scholarships, and Committee on Allocations. Records include a program from the 1932 official opening of the National Research Laboratories, the commemorative issue from the 300th meeting of the National Research Council of Canada. Subseries also includes documentation of the NRC visit to the Defence Research Establishment at Valcartier in 1982, including the visit program, a fact sheet, and a photograph. There is also documentation of the 51st Executive Committee of Council Meeting, in 1983. Lastly, one file consists of correspondence, budget reports, memos, papers, minutes and notes relating to planning and the future of the NRC in 1986-1987.

Subject files and background material

Subseries consists of general subject files and background material on the environment, energy issues, and renewable energy. Topics include environmental activism, groups, conferences, publications, and letters; energy research and planning; energy scenarios for the future; broadening Canada’s energy supply options; renewable energy; solar energy; and wind energy. Records include publications, newsletters, correspondence, news clippings, and brochures.

Nuclear technologies

Subseries consists of records relating to a wide variety activities pertaining to Dr. Franklin’s concerns around nuclear energy and technologies. Records include news clippings, correspondence, minutes, copies of government records, submissions, and reports.

Files document a 1996 panel on nuclear waste management, to which Dr. Franklin made an oral presentation and written submission, on behalf of VOW. A number of files pertain to the MOX (mixed oxide fuel) forum, which challenged the disposition of Russian and U.S. plutonium in Ontario generating stations. Other files reflect opposition to Canada’s sales of CANDU reactors to other nations.

Voice of Women and Hydro Ontario

Subseries documents the Voice of Women’s participation in public hearings on the future demands of electricity for Ontario: The Ontario Hydro Demand/Supply Plan Hearings. VOW was the only women’s organization as well as the only peace organization asking for intervener status at the inquiry. Because VOW received funding as interveners, they were able to retain part-time legal counsel and raise a number of issues that would otherwise have not been discussed. Although the inquiry was prematurely discontinued, much of the evidence brought before the panel by the interveners became part of the revised strategy of the next Ontario government.

Subseries also includes more general files on Ontario Hydro, including publications, news clippings, records relating to the sale of tritium.

China

Subseries consists of records relating to Dr. Franklin’s trip to China for the International Conference of Early Metallurgy, including background and planning material, correspondence, reports, articles, and notebooks. Subseries also contains booklets, postcards and related to various historical sites and artifacts in China.

Clinical files

Sub-series consists of clinical records kept by Dr. Farrar including patient files, patients’ correspondence, patients’ notebooks and clinical forms.

Courts and Trials

After I was appointed dean in early 1972, I started to organise an interdisciplinary series of lectures on courts and trials (file 2). This was designed to make a statement that we were not just a professional school but were part of the University. The series was widely advertised and was given every few weeks throughout the academic year 1972-73 (files 3-4). The contributors were from a wide array of disciplines--Reg Allen in philosophy, Don Dewees in economics, Tony Doob in psychology, Jim Giffen in sociology, Charles Hanly in psychoanalysis, Ken McNaught in history, Anatol Rapoport in mathematics, and Peter Russell and Don Smiley in political science (files 5-15). Northrop Frye backed out (file 8), but later contributed to the Crime in Literature series. The series was published by the U of T Press in 1975 (files 17-22) and the book was dedicated to Bora Laskin (file 11).

General subject/correspondence files

Sub-series consists of files relating to a variety of subjects/correspondents such as studies/surveys, scholarships/awards, installations (Principal's), grants/funding, lectures, senior administrators, Victoria University committees and reunion dinners as well as subject files on academic courses, enrollment programming and departments.

Fellows of Victoria College

Fellows of Victoria College were appointed from the larger U. of T. community to expand the academic and cultural life of the College. They participated in ways both formal (e.g. public lectures) and informal (e.g. presence in Senior Common Room), and received an honorarium, High Table privileges and office space on campus. Junior Fellows were senior graduate students who provided course and career counseling as well as some tutoring to Vic students.

Sub-series consists of files on the nomination, appointment and remuneration of Fellows; changes in the appointment of Fellows after 1982; and a single file on the selection of Junior Fellows.

Membership and Board of Directors' meetings

Sub-series consists of notification of meetings, agendas, minutes, reports from committees (including budgets and other financial statements), proposals, forms updating the officers and directors, and other materials prepared for meetings of the New Catholic Times membership, including the annual meeting of the Board of Directors.

From 1976 to 1989, members referred to themselves as "the collective" and meetings, held approximately bi-weekly, were called Collective meetings. The annual meeting of the Board of Directors usually occurred in January or February. Records for Collective meetings for the years 1978 and 1979 are absent, as indicated on post-it notes in the records for 1980 and 1977. From 1990 on, members referred themselves as "the membership" and Membership meetings were held twice a year, with the business conducted at the fall meeting. Records for membership meetings after 1999 do not exist, though see sub-series 2 for records pertaining to meetings of the Publishing Group.

Staff meetings

Sub-series consists of agendas and minutes for meetings of the staff of the Catholic New Times for the years 2002-2006. Staff were responsible for the day-to-day aspects of producing the newspaper.

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