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Editing

This series documents Gotlieb's activities on editorial advisory boards, as a referee, consultant and/or editor. It includes documentation on several publications, including the Annals of the History of Computing, the Journal of Computing and Society, Utilitas Mathematicas as well as several encyclopedias. There is also one general file relating to a variety of editorial projects. Not included in this series, are the papers related to his role in editing the publications of ACM. These records can be found in Series IV.

The files may contain correspondence, referee reports, submissions of papers, biographies of contributors, minutes and meeting agenda.

Research

This series documents Gotlieb's early research, mainly in the use of computers to develop timetables. Gotlieb's interest in this area of computer application evolved from a very practical need to revamp the Arts and Science Timetable in early 1960s, a task he was assigned as a young professor. Through the 1960s, he gave many papers on the subject and his expertise was recognized internationally. However, overtime, his interests led elsewhere and his time table research was passed on to another generation of computer scientists. He is recognized internationally for laying the groundwork in this area of computer applications. There are eight files on this research containing correspondence, reports, notes and related papers.

There is also one file relating to early research on computers and music. This master’s thesis research by student Jim Gabura had as its goal to successfully develop software that could recognize music by specific composers. The file contains original research, papers, correspondence, research reports and other related material. There is also the original cassette of taped music used in the research titled as "Appendix 6 -- Recordings" (For access see /002S). This research was being done in the early 1960s.

In the early 1980s, Gotlieb participated in the Bell Canada VISTA project, a videotex system that allowed users to access computer stored information on a modified television screen. This was more or less an early attempt at a communication system like the Internet. Included is correspondence, the original agreement, notes and publications documenting the experiment. There are also slides showing what the screens of information looked like. (For access see /001P(38)-(39).

There is one other graduate project documented in this series. This is the research by student Darrell Parsons (Ph.D. 1990) looking into the use of computers as it relates to productivity in banking. This thesis research was eventually published in the Journal of Productivity Analysis as “Productivity and Computers in Canadian Banking”, by Darrell Parsons, Calvin C. Gotlieb and Michael Denny, 1993. A copy of the paper, along with correspondence, research outlines and proposals can be found in the last file of this series.

Somers Family fonds

  • UTA 1792
  • Fonds
  • 1937-1968

Memorabilia documenting Lou Somers academic and athletic achievements while a student of University College (B.A. 1940), specifically his membership on the Rugby Team. City of Toronto roll of service, 1943. Publications from various American Universities.

Photographs include his graduation portrait, military portraits and snapshots; a panoramic view of the Senior Intercollegiate Football Team, 1937; group photos of the Senior Rugby Team 1939-40, the Junior Rugby 1938-39 and the Junior Rugby Interprovicial and City Champs 1936-37.

Somers family

Edward Beane Hubbard fonds

  • UTA 1397
  • Fonds
  • 1923-1924

Consists of a newspaper clipping on student athletics boxing match, three U of T sports logos, three sports medals, photograph of U of T Boxing, Wrestling and Fencing Club Intercollegiate Champions, 1923-1924, taken by Peake Whittingham, Toronto.

Hubbard, Edward Beane

Ceremonies and obligation lists

This series includes copies of addresses and poems used in homilies during the Ritual, obligation booklets, obligation lists for special ceremonies, statistics on obligated engineers and collected correspondence concerning the preparations for the inaugural ceremonies. Several files also include information on special ceremonies for older candidates and proposed special ceremonies that did not occur.

Material from accession B1995-0040 (1959-1989) also includes a copy of the ceremony book for Camp Wardens, application forms and considerable material concerning the manufacture and distribution of iron rings, as well as preparations made for campus ceremonies. Material from Accession B2009-0029 includes six files (06-11) containing updated ceremony booklets and guidelines, a certificate for the nomination of an Honorary Camp Warden, several speeches and a candidate list. Files are arranged chronologically. White prints, several photographs and two obligation sheets have been removed for separate storage.

Expansion of the ritual

The series contains primarily correspondence with Camps Two through Nine, much of it dealing with the matter of verifying candidate credentials from different jurisdictions. There is also some correspondence of a social nature related to the establishment of authorities and Camp Wardens in new jurisdictions. The system of record keeping by Camp appears to have stopped in 1954, after which correspondence pertaining to the Camps may be found in the individual correspondence files in series 5. Arrangement is by Camp number, followed by the records pertaining to discussions of expanding the Ritual to the United Kingdom, India and the United States.

Camp Ten records pertain to a proposed camp in Ottawa, which was never established. Camp Ten, when it was established, became the camp for the Université Laval in Québec City in 1956. Camp Twelve was established by Carleton University in Ottawa in 1958. The B1995-0040 accession includes one file of material, from 1978-1987, related to the expansion of the “Links” programme of the Order of the Engineer organization, based in the United States. The records for Camp Five contain an example of an early iron ring.

National Research Council

Series contains is composed of records dating from McKay’s time at the National Research Council. During the Second World War, the organization was mobilized to support the Allied war effort. As a result, most of the series’ records relate to military research and development. Canadian Army Operational Research Group (C.A.O.R.G.) reports compose approximately half the files that make up the series. These reports cover subjects ranging from blast measurements for anti-tank mine clearance to the number and distribution of Japanese paper balloons in North America. There are also two summary reports on Japanese balloon incidents.
The remainder of the textual and graphic records are made up of committee minutes, general Department of Defence documents, and a short paper on Canada’s part in the development of the radio proximity fuse, which McKay contributed to as assistant to project leader Professor Arnold Pitt.

Also included in this series are the remains of a Japanese paper balloon. Paper balloons, also known as balloon bombs, were a by-product of an atmospheric experiment by Axis scientists, which discovered a powerful air current traveling across the Pacific at about 30,000 feet [1]. Taking advantage of this knowledge, the Japanese military developed what may well have been the first intercontinental weapon in the form of explosive devices attached to paper balloons. These balloons were released in Japan and carried along the Pacific by a jet stream, ultimately finding their way to North America’s West Coast. Although the Japanese are thought to have released as many as 9,000 paper balloons, only 1,000 or so are thought to have reached North America, resulting in a total of six casualties [2].

NOTES

  1. Johnna Rizzo, “Japan’s secret WWII weapon: Balloon bombs,” National Geographic, 27 May 2013.
  2. Ibid.

Manuscripts and publications

Series contains manuscripts and publications that McKay either wrote or kept in his files. Although the majority of pieces address scientific matters, the series also includes a Junior Prize Essay (“Fathers Versus Sons”) that McKay wrote while still in high school. A number of pieces, including the aforementioned “Fathers Versus Sons,” are to be found in journals or magazines, which have been included in the fonds both so as to preserve context and because many of them are no longer in print. It is worth noting that four of the articles in the series were coauthored, rather than sole-authored, by McKay. These are: “The Decay of Nitrogen Afterglow,”
“”The Decay of the Populations of Metastable Atoms and Ions from the Same D-C. Discharge in Neon,” “Effect of Previous History on Switching Rate in Ferrites,” and “The Hall Effect and Resistivity in Tellurium.” The series also includes McKay’s PhD dissertation, The Measurement of the Dialectric Constant of Electrolytes, and the high school physics textbook he co-authored with D.G. Ivey and which his sister, Marjorie, illustrated.

John Satterly fonds

  • UTA 1743
  • Fonds
  • 18-- - 1964 [predominant 1886-1963]

This fonds contains the personal and professional papers documenting the life and accomplishments of physicist John Satterly. Included is personal and professional correspondence, family documents, material related to Devon, England and its history; photoprints; course notes and related material such as certificates and diplomas from Satterly's days as a student; lecture notes; laboratory experiments; problem sets, examinations; textbooks; research notes; and publications which document his career as physicist at the University of Toronto.

Few administrative records of the Department of Physics from the first half of the twentieth century are available in the University Archives. As a result, this fonds provides documentation not only the life of the renowned physicist, but also of the teaching of Physics at the University of Toronto from 1912 to 1950 as well. The personal papers of other physicists already in the Archives compliment the Satterly fonds.

Satterly, John

Correspondence

This series contains a mixture of personal and professional correspondence with friends, colleagues, government departments, publishers and non-governmental organizations relating to all aspects of Metta Spencer's career. The correspondence, in the form of letters, faxes and e-mail, document her network of friendships especially throughout the international peace community as well with other North American sociologists.

Addresses and speeches

This series contains addresses and speeches presented mainly at peace conferences, meetings and professional sociology associations. Most of them relate to the peace movement, advocacy and disarmament. There is also Spencer's speech on accepting the Jus Prize in Human Rights. Again these papers represent only a small fraction of addresses given throughout Spencer's career. Arrangement is chronological for specific titles with general speeches filed at the end.

University of Toronto Administration

Although Prof. Spencer held many administrative positions within the Department of Sociology, including several terms as associate chair for Erindale, this series mainly documents her successful efforts to establish and co-ordinate an interdisciplinary Peace and Conflict Studies Programme at Erindale College. Included are the early proposals and background documentation, minutes of meeting, reports, course and program descriptions and correspondence.

Books

This series consists of two sets of files. The first set relates to Prof. Nelson’s only published book Land and Power: Britain and Allied Policy on Germany’s Frontiers 1916-1919 (University of Toronto Press and Routledge, Keagan Paul, London, 1963). Included is a full typescript with revisions, as well as some earlier drafts. Some drafts are also interfiled with notes found in Series 6 Research Notes. This series also contains some correspondence with the publishers and a signed publication agreement. There is additional correspondence relating to permissions for use of materials. Finally there is a file of collected reviews of the book and informal comments. In 1963, this book shared the George Lewis Beer Prize given by the American Historical Society for ‘outstanding work in the field of European international history since 1895’.

A second set of files relates to research Prof. Nelson undertook late in his career. It was a book on the trial and conviction of a British citizen, Miss Malecka, in 1912 in Russia on a charge of sedition. While one file of notes is dated 1983, records generally indicate that Prof. Nelson began researching the case in earnest in the early 1990s. He was studying it in reference to the question of ‘nationality’ and what it could reveal about Anglo Russian relations prior to WWI. Entitled simply Malecka Case, typescripts begin in 1993 and go through various drafts up to 2004. There is no evidence in the records that Prof. Nelson had sought out a publisher and it is clear the book was never published. These drafts, revisions, outlines and notes have been arranged chronologically.

Associations and committees

This series consists of files for committee and clubs in which Prof. Nelson was an active member. Files relating to his days as a student show his involvement in the Modern History Club (1938) and the Historical Club (1939-40) at the University of Toronto. In the latter club, he held the position of secretary then president. From those early years, there is also a file documenting his work in the Eglinton Jr. Conservative Club (1939-1943). Files contain memorabilia, notes, minutes, membership lists and correspondence.

Later in his career, there are more professional types committees outside of the framework of the University of Toronto including the Atlantic Treaty Organization (1960-1964), a provincial body called the Ontario Curriculum Institute (1962-1964), as well as the Canada Council Academic Advisory Panel (1975). For all of these later committees, files contain original correspondence, agenda and minutes as well as reports and notes.

Charles Stewart Phelps fonds

  • UTA 1657
  • Fonds
  • 1929-1946

Course notes, laboratory notes, engineering drawings, term papers and examination questions in electrical and civil engineering, compiled by Charles Stewart Phelps and Edward Nelson Howard while students at the University of Toronto and by Phelps subsequent to his graduation; notices regarding student activities.

Phelps, Charles Stewart

Biographical

This series gives a good overview of Prof. Moggridge’s career. Correspondence and personnel documents discuss appointments, applications, leaves and promotions. There are also several files relating to awards and fellowships as well as research grant applications. Finally, there is a copy of an unpublished autobiography with related notes.

Papers and talks

This series further documents Prof. Moggridge academic publishing and output. Included are non refereed articles and papers, as well as unpublished works such as talks, seminars, and papers presented at conferences. Files contain at least one draft of article or paper and possibly some related notes and/or correspondence. They are arranged chronologically.

Editing

In addition to his original writings, Prof. Moggridge’s international contribution to the field in economic history is also supplemented with his editing projects and in particular the Collected Writings of the John Maynard Keynes with the Royal Economic Society. Prof. Moggridge was managing editor for twenty-four of the thirty volume series. Files contain extensive correspondence, notes and minutes of meetings that detail the projects from their inception to their distribution. Some the key economists with which Prof. Moggridge’s worked include Cambridge economists Lord Richard Kahn and Sir Austin Robinson, Don Patinkin of Hebrew University of Jerusalem, polish-born English economist Tadeusz Rabczynski. There is also extensive correspondence with publishers Macmillan and Cambridge University Press.

This series also documents other editorial projects and positions including: the editing of the J.E. Meade diaries and Lionel Robbins diaries with fellow University of Toronto economist Susan Howson; History of Economics Society (HES) proceedings from 1988 conference entitled Perspective in the History of Economic Thought; his role as managing editor for the HES journal Studies in the History of Economic Thought; as well as his work the Editorial Board and as Review Editor for the journal History of Political and Economy (HOPE).

Referee reviews and comments

This series provides extensive documentation of Prof. Moggridge’s role as a peer reviewer or referee for many publications, research projects and grant applications. Correspondence, referee reports, notes and applications are found throughout these files often titled “Comments on others”. Records are filed chronologically.

Research projects

This series contains files relating to specific research projects in the Departments of Physics and Medicine in which Prof. McNeill was an active participant. Most of the files relate directly to the building and use of a "low background" room, called the Steel Room used to measure low level radiation in humans. He was instrumental in having it built at the university and for providing administrative support for its research use. Included is correspondence, memoranda, research data, grant files, measurements and progress reports. There are also minutes, correspondence and reports of the President's Committee on Background Radiation from which came the impetus for such a laboratory. Experiments and readings conducted in the Steel Room were some of the earliest examples of research in the field of nuclear medicine undertaken at the University of Toronto.

Later research files relate to his research on radon levels, his work developing and patenting a land mine detention device and his personal interest in Stonehenge.

Teaching files

This series consists of lecture notes for courses taught in nuclear physics at the University of Glasgow where he lectured from 1952-1957 and for courses taught at the University of Toronto including:

  • Application of Physics in Medicine
  • Physics Questions for Life Sciences
  • Physics 138 – Nuclear section
  • Physics 238 – Biological Effects of Nuclear Radiation, Heat Engines and Physical Optics

Some files also contain notes on class experiments and assignments as well as some examination questions.

Education records

Includes mainly lecture notes from courses taken while attending Oxford for his B.A. and M.A.. Also includes notes and a copy of his Ph.D. Thesis (1950) and a speech given to the Oxford University Physical Society in 1948.

Irvine Israel Glass fonds

  • UTA 1313
  • Fonds
  • 1938-1994

Fonds consists of records documenting the career of Irvine Glass as a specialist in shock waves, a professor and administrator at the Institute for Aerospace Studies and his personal interest in the Jewish peoples through his involvement, in particular, with Canadian Professors for Peace in the Middle East, the Committee of Concerned Scientists, and the Sino-Judaic Institute.

See accession-level descriptions and finding aids for further details.

Glass, Irvine Israel

Administrative files (University of Toronto)

Dr. Glass held several administrative positions in the Institute for Aerospace Studies. From 1961-1966 he was its chairman and from 1968 to 1974 it’s assistant director of education. Most of the records from both of these positions have remained in the respective administrative jurisdictions.

The files in this series include Dr. Glass' "activity reports" (1975-1993), minutes of the Institute's council meetings (1975-1977) and its advisory committee (1976); proposals for buildings, teaching assignments, and post-doctoral fellowships; correspondence concerning visiting professors and exchange students from the Soviet Union (1962-1988) and China (1981-1982), and correspondence about Pathways to Excellence, the history of UTIAS (1976).

Teaching files and lecture notes

Dr. Glass' teaching career began in the autumn of 1950 when he was appointed a research associate in the then Institute of Aerophysics. His earliest surviving lectures are on boundary layer theory, but he became best known for his fourth year course in gasdynamics (ASE 1048, AER 410S), and his graduate courses: non-stationary gasdynamics and wave interactions (1009); shock waves in continuous media, a reading course (1014); gas flows at high temperature (1302, 1402); hypersonic gasdynamics (2003); and his gasdynamics seminar (2045X). While his career was spent at Institute, he also taught elsewhere, especially during sabbatical leave, and was in much demand as a visiting lecturer.

This series consists largely of lecture notes, mostly by Dr. Glass but including some by other specialists in areas such as boundary layer and wing theory. Included are assignments, problem sets, examination questions, course evaluations by students, and a single file on the Institute's Gasdynamics Group (1975-1984).

This series begins with the surviving lecture files from the year (1957-1958) Dr. Glass taught at the Imperial College of Science and Technology in London while on sabbatical. Next are his teacher and course evaluations at the University of Toronto (1969-1980); general examination files (1955-1967); and lecture notes, problems sets and examinations, grouped by course and arranged, as far as possible, chronologically within each course. The principal courses are: advanced mechanics, aerodynamic measurements, boundary layer theory, dynamics of space flight, wing theory, gasdynamics, and shock waves. The files begin in 1950 and end in 1984, the year of Dr. Glass' retirement.

Addresses and public lectures

Dr. Glass was much sought after as a public lecturer and gave freely of his time. Most of the addresses relate to his professional work, but he also took time to share his private passions, especially the utilization of geothermal energy and his research on the Jews in China. The last arose from his invitations to visit China in 1980 and 1985, where he was awarded an honorary professorship from the prestigious Nanjing Aeronautical Institute.

The files contain drafts of addresses, covering correspondence, notes, programs, press coverage, photoprints and slides.

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