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Architecture, art and design juries

Professor Richards has been since the early 1980s an active participant on architecture, art and design juries. The juries adjudicated projects ranging from student competitions to architectural grants (Canada Council), urban design awards (Etobicoke, Mississauga, Scarborough, Toronto), public art competitions (City of Waterloo, ice sculptures in Toronto), building projects (Coptic community master plan and cathedral, new city hall for Markham, Ontario), redevelopment projects such as Harbourfront and Pearson Airport, to architectural awards. Professor Richards was not a member of the jury for the Kitchener City Hall competition (1989) but he assembled a lot of material and also wrote about it. He was also a member of the Greater Toronto Airport Authority’s selection committee for lead architect in its Lester B. Pearson International Airport transformation project (1997).

The files contain correspondence, notes, photographs, architectural drawings, press coverage and reports. The arrangement is chronological and by the name of the project. The full name and date of each competition is listed in Professor Richards’ curriculum vitae (B2007-0011/001(02)-(06).

Advising, assessing and consulting

In addition to his work as a juror, Professor Richards was active as a consultant or advisor to a number of projects, most associated with architectural and design, but some with academic matters such as tenure and the external supervision of theses. Some of the activities listed in his curriculum vitae are filed with other series and others are not documented in this series. The arrangement is chronologically by the name of the organization or individual concerned. The files may contain any or all of the following: correspondence, notes, memoranda, reports, photographs, architectural drawings and site plans.

The most heavily documented of his consulting work is with the selection of an architect for the Canadian Clay and Glass Gallery in Waterloo, the Environmental Sciences Building at Trent University; as a thesis advisor (1989-1990) to Brian Christianson of Miami University whose thesis was on Canadian architecture; as a member of the 2006 program review for the School of Architecture at McGill University; and his being a consultant to and a member of the Royal Ontario Museum’s architectural advisory committee regarding ‘Renaissance ROM’ and Daniel Libeskind’s project.. Two other well documented activities are his work as a member of the curatorial advisory board of Power Plant (1987-1990) and as a member of the visiting team of the National Architectural Accrediting Board (USA) to Texas State University (1992).

Manuscripts and publications

Professor Richards’ interest in nurturing a broad understanding of an appreciation for the art of architecture, especially as it applies to modern architecture and the influences on him, ranging from Japanese and Chinese architecture to the design of commercial advertisements and popular cultural events such as raves, are documented in his writings. This series covers unpublished manuscripts and many, but not all, of the articles and books listed in Professor Richards’ curriculum vitae (June 2004), along with some that have appeared since. The arrangement is by name of title, filed chronologically.

The series begins with two boxes of files of articles about Professor Richards or in which he is mentioned. These are followed by letters to the editor, book reviews, and manuscripts and publications. The principal unpublished work is ‘The latent energies of Michelangelo’s private library’ (1974). The last title in the series is Richard’s foreword to Chu Dongzhu’s Starting design on architecture (2006).

Teaching

This series documents Prof. Berger’s teaching related activities including course instruction and supervision of predominantly PhD graduate students. During his career at the University, Prof. Berger taught five undergraduate courses in Canadian history. Three of his undergraduate courses are documented in this series: HIS 261 “Canada since Confederation”, HIS 464 “The Prairie West since 1850”, and HIS 361 “Twentieth century Canada”. Handwritten lecture notes are included for HIS 361 arranged by topic of each lecture. Graduate course files include 1155Y “Topics in the History of Victorian Canada” and a file on PhD field work examination. Also included are copies of some student papers.

This series also contains files for graduate students Prof. Berger supervised between 1968 and 1997, arranged alphabetically by surname. These files contain correspondence, assessments and progress reports on the thesis and other records. In addition there is a file on theses for students he did not supervise. Finally, there are files documenting his graduate students who did not complete their theses (1970-1982).

University education

This series consists of two files containing his diplomas for Bachelor of Arts (1871) and Master of Arts (1873) degrees from the University of Toronto, and essays written for courses of study in political science.

Teaching and lecture notes

This series contains lecture notes for various courses taught by Prof. Dale, presumably at the University of Toronto, in his position as Lecturer and Associate Professor of Latin and Roman History in the Department of Classics at University College. Files relate to Roman History lectures for third and fourth year students, notes on Livy, Cicero Academica, Caesar, Lucretius, Aristotle's Ethics (with exam questions), and Ancient Greek and Roman History (with exam questions).

Photographs

Images consist mainly of portraits of William Dale including one from 1873 when he received his M.A. and several copies of an engraving done in 1920, one year before his death. There is also one group portrait of the General Committee of the University College, Literary and Scientific Society, 1868-1869.

Correspondence

This series contains correspondence received by Fredericka (or Frieda) before, during and after her marriage to William Dale and correspondence from her children following the death of her husband in 1921. The letters prior to her marriage predominantly document the period after graduation from Queen’s University when she attempted to find employment as a teacher or companion and her courtship by William Dale. The correspondence from William Dale does not begin until January 1900 when she is in Saranac Lake, New York, and after breaking off her engagement to Jack Munro. In addition to describing his growing love for Frieda, William also describes his teaching duties at McMaster University and his family and life in St. Marys.

The correspondence after their marriage indicates that they were frequently separated, with William teaching in Toronto or at the farm in Blanschard Twp while Frieda stayed with her parents in Cornwall or Kingston. From 1905 to his death in 1921, correspondence from her husband and some Ryckman family members concerns the birth of their children, his participation in the local government in St.Marys, farming matters and trips to Toronto. There is a file of condolence letters on the death of William Dale and includes letters from Maurice Hutton, W. S. Milner (University of Toronto), and F. H. Wallace (Victoria College).

From 1923 to 1930, Margaret (“Marnay”) and then Frances (“Fran”) wrote regularly to their mother while attending the University of Toronto. These letters describe the day to day university life from a woman’s perspective – the lectures, residence life, social activities and include impressions of friends and teachers. The letters from Frances should be read in conjunction with her diaries (See Sous fonds 2, Series 1). It should be noted that there are no letters for 1929, and the 1930 letters are mainly from Frances while she worked at Jasper Park Lodge during the months of June to August and from Margaret describing her trip to Europe that same summer.

University of Toronto and Gymnastics training

Frances Dale’s primary interest as a student and as a teacher was physical education and training. This series contains correspondence, memorabilia, press clippings, essays and other documents relating to her student days at U. of T. and her ongoing interest in physical education. In particular are two files containing correspondence, notes, essays and clippings documenting mainly her trips to Europe to attend English Scandinavian Summer School in 1934, and the Lingaid in Stockholm with the Liverpool Physical Training College in 1939.

Subject and conference files

The files in this series contain correspondence, notes, and manuscripts relating to his activities as author, teacher, and consultant to government agencies and participant in academic conferences relating to economic policy analysis and telecommunications. Included in this series are records relating to his activities with the U.S. National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc. (1965-1977) including his period as the University of Toronto’s representative on the Board of Directors.

Audio Reels, Film Reels and Documentaries

Series consists of 78 audio reels, 8 film reels and 1 videocassette made during events given by l'Arche International. These reels are arranged chronologically whenever possible. The reels mostly feature Jean Vanier at various events, although other speakers are included. The events at which these were created are unknown, which is the reason these materials have been kept separate from the other series in this Collection.

Sound Recordings series

Series consists of eleven audio cassettes of lectures and retreats given by Nouwen from 1985 to 1994. Specifically, there are two audio cassettes from a ALT Brugge Retreat on the topics of Prayer and Reconciliation. There are two audio cassettes which contain a Mass given by Nouwen on Compassion. There is one audio cassette titled "La Visitation" and another titled "Francais – Homelie – Houietie". There are also five audio cassettes of Nouwen leading a seminar on the Gospel of St. John while he was at L'Arche Trosly-Breuil.

University of Toronto. Department of Surgery

This series partially documents Morley’s professional activities as a neurosurgeon, clinical professor and administrator at the Toronto General Hospital, affiliated with the University of Toronto Department of Surgery. Correspondence with fellow colleagues, minutes of meetings, committee reports and press clippings document various Toronto General Hospital committee including the Staff Association that Morley addressed at its inaugural meeting in 1963. There is also documentation surgeons Kenneth Livingston, Gordon Murray and W.S. Keith as well as information on the McKenzie Fund at the Toronto General Hospital.

Photographs

This series contains photographs collected by Morley mainly for his research on the history of Neurological Surgery in Canada and his biography on Kenneth G. McKenzie. Predictably many of the images document neurology staff at the Toronto General Hospital (TGH). Included are group portraits of the staff in the 1950s as well as individual images of Sir Geoffrey Jefferson, Kenneth G. McKenzie, E. Harry Botterell. Later photographs document events or celebrations at TGH including Botterell Day in 1978, Morley’s retirement party in 1985 and the 75 yrs of Neurosurgery in Canada Symposium held in 1998. There are also 33 slides relating Toronto General Hospital history used by Findlay in his articles on the history of neurosurgery at the TGH, including portraits of Dr. C. L. Starr, Kenneth G. McKenzie, Harry Botterell, Bill Keith, Franck Turnbull, Joe Cluff, Charles Drake, Jessie Young, Bill Lougheed, Eric Linell and Ross Fleming. Finally, filed at the end, are photographs originally belonging to the TGH showing equipment and procedures in neurology in the 1960s. Many of these have annotations by Morley’s in order to highlight their significance.

Education

This series documents elements of Professor Richards’ and Frederic Urban’s education, beginning (for Larry) with elementary school in Matthews, Indiana and proceeding through his university education at Miami University (B.Arch 1967) and Yale University (M.Arch 1975) and for Frederic, education at Cathedral High School, Merrimack College, Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, and the Whitney Museum of American Art, and courses offered elsewhere. The surviving records for Larry’s early education are fragmentary and even the files for Yale University have some gaps. The files on Frederic’s education are complemented by those in his personal records, B2007-0012. The arrangement for each individual is by institution attended in chronological order.

The series begins with notebooks and memorabilia from Professor Richard’s public school studies [for his ‘Memories of my school days’, see Series 16], and correspondence and course material, primarily project and design notes and drawings (3 major projects), and a yearbook from his undergraduate studies at Miami University. The files on Yale include the portfolio Richards’ presented for admission, course notes, project drawings, memorabilia, and a file on the Yale University tuition postponement plan, and photographs. The drawings include conceptual project material for projects under Professor Moore and a variety of project drawings and figure drawings. Fred’s files include correspondence, programmes, memorabilia, and related publications.

Course Files

Includes selective exams, problems, research reports, lecture notes and reference to readings for chemistry courses taught by Yates at the University of Toronto and to a lesser extent Harvard University where he began his career as an academic.

Personal

This series consists of two files containing his curriculum vitae and clippings, some correspondence and published articles on or about Prof. Harney. Included are copies of newspaper clippings quoting his views on Italian Canadians, notices of awards and honours for his book Dalla Frontiera alle Little Italies among others, and a review of posthumously published essays entitled If One were to write a history…Selected writings by Robert F. Harney. Edited by Pierre Anctil and Bruno Ramirez.

Correspondence – letters of recommendation

This series consists of files of chronologically arranged correspondence with students, colleagues, employers, editors etc. relating to requests for formal and informal recommendations from Prof. Harney. Many of these are addressed to Professor Harney in his capacity as Director/ President of the Multicultural History Society of Ontario.

Research materials

This series contains files relating to the production of Prof. Harney’s proposed book on “Italians in Canada”. It includes transcripts of interviews and other biographical information on identifiable individuals, notes, and some drafts documenting Italian Canadians in provinces across the country. It should be noted that some of the transcripts may be copies of records held at the Multicultural History Society of Ontario.

University of Toronto

This series contains mainly files documenting Prof. Wilson’s activities as teacher, administrator and consultant in the Department of Political Economy, the Institute for the Quantitative Analysis of Social and Economic Policy, later known as the Institute for Policy Analysis. These files contain correspondence, notes, minutes of meetings, reports, etc. In particular are files relating to Econometric Forecasting Programme (1973-1976), Industrial Organization program (1970-1978), and the Policy and Economic Analysis Programme (PEAP) (1978-1983).

In addition are files relating to his activities on University committees such as Presidential Advisory Committee on Disciplinary Procedures (1969-70), and Special Committee on Frozen Policies (1988-1989).

SAC Historical Project

Term papers for undergraduate history courses conducted by Professor Ian Radforth on the history of the Students' Administrative Council, University of Toronto, 1930-1950; this project was known as the SAC Historical Project.

Employment: University of Toronto

Professor Richards was lured to the University of Toronto in 1980 by the new Dean, Blanche van Ginkel, who had earlier recruited several new young faculty members, including Alberto Perez Gomez and Daniel Libeskind. Both had left by the time Richards arrived and he soon found out why. He “walked into a rat’s nest of warring factions. The inflexible ideologues, led by Prof. Peter Pragnell, were totally closed to student and younger faculty’s interests in post-modernism.” Richards soon became disillusioned and found reward only through the new ‘Introduction to Architecture’ course he developed and taught at University College. He also co-ordinated the 1980-1981 fourth-year core programme and (with Michael Kirkland) the fall 1981 studio in Venice [1]. After a year he left Toronto for the position of associate professor in the School of Architecture at the University of Waterloo.

Although Professor Richards maintained contact with the University of Toronto (he withdrew his candidacy for the deanship in 1985) and actually moved from Waterloo to Toronto in 1990, it was not until January 1997 that he returned to the Faculty, this time as dean, an appointment that was to last 7 ½ years. “He led a division of 22 core and 48 part-time faculty, 20 staff, and 275 graduate students, which offers three degree programs: a professional Master of Architecture, a professional Master of Landscape Architecture, and a post-professional Master of Urban Design…He gained approvals for and implemented two long-range academic plans, the 2000 PLAN and the 2004 PLAN, leading to the reinvigoration of the creative life of the school. His accomplishments included facilitating the incremental renovation of the building at 230 College Street by leading Toronto architects and establishing the Faculty’s first endowed chair, The Frank Gehry International Visiting Chair in Architectural Design, launched in 2003. He established the Faculty’s first Advancement Office and raised more than $8-million in new funding through the division’s “Design the Future” campaign. [He also]…played a key role in assisting the University with architect selection processes for major projects on its three campuses.” [2] On the St. George campus three significant buildings by international architects were erected: the Terrence Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Bimolecular Research (Alliance + Behnisch Architekten), the Leslie L. Dan Pharmacy Building (Norman Foster) and Graduate House (Morphosis, Thom Mayne).

The earliest records in the series consist of correspondence, memoranda, reports and associated material documenting Professor Richards’ stint as assistant professor in 1980-1981; the files cover the activities mentioned above. There are also files on the 1985 search for a dean and the attempt to close the School, followed by several on Richards’ appointment as dean. Files are then arranged in descending order of hierarchy, beginning with the Governing Council, its Physical Planning and Design Advisory Committee’s campus planning initiatives (concerning, especially, Graduate House), and meetings of principals, deans, academic directors and chairs. Except for the above committees, those mentioned in Professor Richards’ curriculum vitae are largely absent from this series.

The records of the School/Faculty from 1997-2007 include correspondence; Richards’ activities and his reports; budgets, the 2000 and 2004 long-range plans, and fundraising initiatives. There are files on the restructuring of courses and the renaming and repositioning of the School (using, in part, the expertise of designer Bruce Mau) and the renovations to 230 College Street (the Shore Moffatt Library and the Eric Arthur Gallery). Richards kept extensive files on trips to Japan, Hong Kong and China relating to the Faculty’s ‘Designs for Living’ cultural exchange project. The series concludes with files on the creation of the Gehry Chair; courses taught; lecture series; exhibitions; and publicity. The files on the courses taught contain course outlines, assignments, tests, examination questions, and some lectures.

[1] Personal communication from Larry Richards, 23 July 2009
[2] Drawn from Professor Richard’s curriculum vitae (June 2004), p. 3.

Photographs

This series contains photographs and slides from various swimming events. Many of the photographs appear to have been used by Thierry in issues of Swim News, or for the creation of swimmer biographies and profiles in media guides. The photographers and the events being documented are only clearly identified for some of the images. Some of the photographs are attributed to Marco Chiesa.

Correspondence

This series contains, in addition to letters, a wide range of material associated with the ongoing production of the Atlas: notes, memoranda, reports, brochures, partial drafts of the manuscript, photoprints and maps. The arrangement is generally chronological, except where otherwise noted.

Manuscripts and publications

Professor Dean, in collaboration with his colleagues on the Atlas project, began speaking and writing about it almost as soon as it began. These addresses and articles helped maintain scholarly interest in the project as it proceeded and also created a wider public awareness. Both are reflected in the reviews that the Atlas received, and the articles that were written about it, particularly after the Leipzig prize was awarded.

Personal correspondence

This series consists of chronologically arranged, incoming personal correspondence, documenting Ms. Walker’s personal life from 1936 to 1998. Correspondents include family, friends, Hart House Theatre colleagues, sorority sisters and fine art students. Major correspondents are: Burgon Bickersteth, Pat Carson, Norman Endicott, Robert Gill and James Reaney. The letters, mostly written in the 1950’s, document Ms. Walker’s friendships, romances, interest in theatre, and travels throughout Europe.

Hart House Theatre

Marion Walker was Production Assistant at Hart House Theatre from 1946 to 1957. Under the directorship of Robert Gill, she designed sets and costumes for each of the Theatre’s annual four plays. Her first production was St. Joan, starring Charmian King. Other early performers who worked with Ms. Walker at Hart House Theatre included Kate Reid, Donald Sutherland, and William Hutt.

The records in this series pertain to Ms. Walker’s involvement with Hart House Theatre. Textual records include scripts 1946, annotated Hart House Theatre programmes 1946 – 1957, and obituaries for Robert Gill, 1974.

Series also includes approximately 100 photographs of various productions for which Ms. Walker designed costumes and sets. The photographs depict various scenes, actors and set designs. Productions represented are: Romeo and Juliet, 1947; Julius Caesar, 1948; the Seagull, 1948; The Skin of Our Teeth, 1948, The Doctor’s Dilemma, 1948; Crime and Punishment, 1949; Othello, 1949; Fortune My Foe, 1950; The Guardsman, 1950; Captain Brassbound’s Conversion, 1950; Medea, 1950; Henry IV, 1950; Marco Millions, 1950; Richard II, 1951; Pygmalion, 1951; The Madwoman of Chaillot, 1951; The Admirable Crichton, 1952; The Winslow Boy, 1952; Macbeth, 1952; The Wild Duck, 1953; The School for Wives, 1956; and The Innocent, 1957.

Series also contains 8 sketchbooks of costume designs for the following Hart House productions: The Internal Machine, 1946; Othello, 1949; Medea, 1950; Richard II, 1951; School for Wives, 1956; Hamlet, [n.d.]; and King Lear, [n.d.].

Personal/Family

Consists of family biographical information on the Rhodes ancestry, submissions to American and Canadian Who’s Who volumes

Correspondence

This series contains general correspondence files arranged chronologically, and separate individual files arranged alphabetically by correspondent. General files include correspondence relating to his early education at the University of Edinburgh, appointments in Scotland and England, and appointment to the School of Hygiene, University of Toronto. Individual correspondents include, among others, faculty members at the University of Toronto such as Dr. Morris Goldner, Dr. John Hastings, Prof. Hannah Farkas-Himsley, Dr. W. Harding le Riche, former students, professional associates and personal friends.

Church of St. Leonard, Toronto

Dr. Rhodes was Vestry Clerk for Church of St. Leonard (Anglican Church of Canada) for ten years (1980 to 1990). His wife, Harriet, was a member of the Outreach Committee. The series consists of annual reports, budgets, minutes of meetings and some correspondence with the Reverend J. Taylor Pryce.

Laboratory Services Branch, Ministry of Health

This series documents Dr. Rhodes employment with the Ontario Ministry of Health as Associate Medical Director and later Medical Director of the Laboratory Services Branch, including appointment negotiations in 1969 to his retirement in 1977. Dr. Rhodes joined the Laboratory Services Branch following his resignation as Director of the School of Hygiene in 1970.
Files consistent of general correspondence and subject files relating to Autoclaving, Disinfectants in the TB Laboratory, Report of the Technical Advisory Committee on Laboratory Safety, Immunization and surveillance and Task force on care and transportation of communicable disease cases.

Ministry of Natural Resources. Rabies Advisory Committee

In 1979 Dr. Rhodes accepted an appointment as Chairman of the Rabies Advisory Committee within the Ministry of Natural Resources. This series documents some of the activities of this committee focusing primarily on immunization against rabies nationally and internationally. Included are general correspondence relating mainly to his appointment and reappointment to this committee and his retirement, and subject files relating to the World Health Organization conference in Essen, Germany, oral immunization of wildlife, safety standards and a seminar in Maple, Ontario on “Public, Intra- and Inter-Agency Relations in Rabies Control programs: a review”

Photographs

Photographs of Dr. Rhodes at various professional meetings and functions. There are also several portraits of Dr. Rhodes in his office and at his desk as well as passport shots of himself and his wife Harriette.

Talks and addresses

This series contains copies of talks and addresses by Prof. French at professional meetings, symposia, and conferences. They are arranged chronologically and cover such research topics as upper atmospheric mass spectroscopy, the Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyser (TAGA), satellite aerodynamics, molecular beams and ion clustering. Not all talks were scientific in nature. Prof. French was often asked to speak about the role of engineering in space exploration and the relationship between university engineering research and industry as well as the commercialization of scientific applications. Historical talks include a paper on Canadian post-war aerospace development, a 1968 talk on Canadian development in space research, as well as papers telling the story of key scientific innovation such as the story on how TAGA and SCIEX came about and the role of the University of Toronto Innovation Foundation.

Teaching

This series is almost entirely made up of course lecture notes for undergraduate and graduate courses taught by Prof. French. Included here are lectures on Aeroelasticity, Rarefied Gas Dynamics, Gas Surface Interactions, Vacuum Technology, Applied Mass Spectrometry and Quadrapole Theory. There is also one file of Prof. French’s appraisal reports of Ph.D. thesis which are restricted.

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