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Manuscripts and drafts

Sub-series consists of manuscripts and drafts of Dr. Hacking’s writing. Records span Dr. Hacking’s career and reflection on topics that include natural kinds, categorization, logic, reasoning, and the philosophy of mathematics. Sub-series includes multiple chapters from the unpublished book Tradition of Natural Kinds and Why is there philosophy of mathematics at all? (2013). Some files include correspondence, which is indicated in the file title within square brackets.

General

Sub-series consists of material published and presented by Prof. Friedland that reflects broad areas of her research. Among topics included are education and occupational therapy-related interventions for a range of conditions. Records include book reviews, offprints, correspondence, typescripts and notes.

Articles

Sub-series consists of reprints of articles written by Dr. Hacking. Records span his early career to the 2000’s and cover topics including statistics, logic, categorization, natural kinds, psychological trauma and disease.

The Ipperwash Inquiry

In November 2003, the Ipperwash Inquiry was established by the Government of Ontario to investigate and report on the factors surrounding the death of Dudley George. Mr. George was shot and killed during a protest at the Ipperwash Provincial Park in 1995. The Commission responsible for the Inquiry submitted its final report in 2007. Prof. Russell served as a member of the Inquiry’s Research Advisory Committee whose work assisted with Part II of the Inquiry: Policy and Research. Material in this sub-series covers background research, correspondence and documentation of the activities of the Committee, as well as draft typescripts of individual chapters from the final report. Series also includes letters written in response to statements made by then OPP Commissioner, Julian Fantino, following the National Day of Action, 2007.

Other studies

This subseries contains files relating to other studies conducted using data from this project. Between 1953 and 1956, Dr. Little and his team attempted to relate diet and the consumption of animal and vegetable fat. Files include some of the work of Dr. Fraser Mustard on butter and margarine. Other files relating to diet document the effect of coffee on serum lipids in the mid 1960’s. Dr. Little and Dr. Shanoff also studied the relationship of heart size to survival of males between the ages of 30 and 69 with myocardial infarction. They found that heart enlargement significantly reduced survival rates. Other files document diseases such as cirrhosis of the liver, diabetes mellitus, familial hypercholesterolemia, gout, hypertension, hypothyroidism, and obesity. Also included are studies of postmen (1954) and another on rugby players showing how exercise is associated with a high intake of calories without raising serum lipids.

Files may contain patient case information, correspondence, data and test results, and manuscripts of some articles and presentations.

Reviews of I. Hacking's publications

Sub-series consists of records collected by Dr. Hacking and his publishers which review his own publications. Material is predominantly press clippings, with some reprints and correspondence. If correspondence is included in a file it is noted in the file title within square brackets.

Scrapbook 1956, 1958

Sub-series consists of four original published articles written by Nouwen in 1956 and 1958. All articles are described to the item level. Two articles are copies of those found in the other scrapbooks. It appears that Nouwen prepared this scrapbook while studying at Nijmegen (1957-1964) and gave it to his mother in July 1975.

Theology degree records

Sub-series consists of materials related to Nouwen’s time pursuing his doctoral (doctoraal) degree in Theology at Nijmegen University. It appears as though Nouwen received the degree conferred upon completion of the doctoral exams although his thesis was not accepted. Note of December 18, 2013: file 319 unequivocally suggests that Nouwen pursued a degree in psychology (or to be precise in the Social Sciences) in early 1971. See also file 329, box 290 which contains a more elaborate outline of the thesis in question.

Negotiating freer trade: the United Kingdom, the United States, Canada and the trade agreements of 1938.(Waterloo, Ont.: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 1989). Written with Norman Hillmer

Early manuscripts of this book were prepared under the title "A shaft of Baltic pine: negotiating the anglo-american-Canadian Trade agreements of 1938." Included in this subseries are an annotated paper presented to the 61st Annual meeting of the CHA (1982); manuscript version originally submitted to the Social Science Federation of Canada for subsidy (Sept. 1985); drafts of various chapters, research notes, and correspondence with Wilfrid Laurier University Press.

Access to the Law

In the summer of 1972, about the time I returned to the University of Toronto as Dean, I developed some ideas on access to the law which I had been thinking about when I was with the Law Reform Commission of Canada during the year 1971-72 .

The idea was to make the law accessible to non-lawyers who could not--then or now--penetrate the complex legal system, whether it was statutes, regulations, or cases. The scheme was to provide written material that could be digested by reasonably intelligent lay persons. It would combine federal and provincial laws. At the time the idea was to provide this information through encyclopaedias that would be available in public libraries and through intermediaries. It would also assist lawyers and legal aid clinics to find answers to problems and to be able to give material to interested clients. If the proposal were to be developed today, it would use the Internet. (See file 1).

A strong advisory committee was established, consisting of Francess Halpenny, the dean of the Faculty of Library Science, Ian Montagnes, the General Editor of the University of Toronto Press, Peter Russell, the Principal of Innis College, John Swan of the Faculty of Law, and Lyle Fairbairn, the counsel to the Ontario Law Reform Commission. (See file 2).

The Faculty of Law was heavily involved in the project because I thought it was desirable to try to get more interdisciplinary and group projects in the Faculty. (See file 3). Simcoe Hall was very supportive of the project. (File 4).

There was widespread consultation with librarians, lawyers and judges, and academics. (Files 5 to 7). Various governmental and non-governmental organisations were also consulted. (Files 8 to 13).

Various funding sources were explored. In the end, the funding was supplied by the Law Reform Commission of Canada, which took an active interest in the project. (Files 14 and 15).

Peter Jewett, a lawyer with Tory, Tory, and who had been my research assistant when he was at Law School, got a leave of absence from his firm to work on the project. He worked with his then wife, Linda Jewett, who was a librarian (she later became a lawyer). They travelled across the country discussing the concept with interested parties. (File 16).

We engaged a number of consultants to examine the present access to the law. Tony Doob of the Centre of Criminology helped us with experiments to see whether lay persons could, in fact, find their way around the present statute book. (They couldn’t.). A psychologist, Professor Paul Kolers, and an expert on linguistics, Harold Gleason, as well as experts in library science, Brian Land, Anne Schabas, Katherine Packer, and Alice Janisch, prepared papers for us. Various individuals assisted us in the preparation of models that could be examined. (File 17).

On February 8, 1974 I gave a speech on the concept to the Toronto Region Group of the Institute of Public Administration, which was excerpted in the Globe, and was widely reported in the Press. The paper was published in the Law Society of Upper Canada Gazette and Canadian Welfare. (Files 20 to 22).

In 1975, the book, Access to the Law, was published by Carswell/Methuen. Again, there was considerable interest in the concept by the press. See, in particular, the editorial by the Globe. (Files 23 and 24).

Although some progress has been made in developing the idea, the project remains unfulfilled. I had the chance of doing more on it when invited by the SSHRC in 1980 to submit a proposal on the project, but was unfortunately too involved at the time in other matters to take up their invitation. (Files 25 and 26).

The concept still makes excellent sense, particularly because of the Internet. It could be attempted by one province and the federal government to demonstrate that it could be done. In my study for the 1997 McCamus Legal Aid Review, I urged them to recommend such a scheme as part of the jurisdiction of the new Legal Services Commission. They did not do so. I also have urged people in South Africa, where there are very few lawyers, to study the scheme. The scheme remains to be tried in Canada or, indeed, in any other common-law jurisdiction.

Scrapbook 1965 -1982

  • CA ON00389 F4-9-6
  • Subseries
  • 1965 - 1975, predominant 1970 - 1972
  • Part of Henri Nouwen fonds

Sub-series consists of originals and photocopies of published articles written by Nouwen, about Nouwen, about his books, or kept by Nouwen between 1965 and 1982. A pen and ink sketch of Nouwen by Prof. Bainton during a lecture in 1972 is found at p. 35. All articles are described to the item level except for an article by A.C. Ramselaar, Nouwen's uncle, and the book reviews which are described at the file level. The book reviews include those for Intimacy, Bidden om het leven, Creative ministry, Een levende heenwijzing, and Met open handen.

Lannoo files

Sub-series consists of ten files which deal with Nouwen's personal and professional dealings with Lannoo, a publishing company located in Belgium. Much of the correspondence is between Nouwen or his assistants and Lieven Sercu, publisher for Lannoo regarding translation. Specific Nouwen publications mentioned in the files include The Wounded Healer, Gracias, A Letter of Consolation, The Way of the Heart, Letters to Marc, In the Name of Jesus, Beyond the Mirror (also referred to as A Glimpse Beyond the Mirror), Life of the Beloved, Reaching Out, With Open Hands, The Genesee Diary, Heart Speaks to Heart, Here & Now, Behold the Beauty of the Lord (also referred to as Icon book), Clowning in Rome, Lifesigns, The Return of the Prodigal Son (also referred to as Canvas of Love), Aging, The Road to Daybreak, The Ultimate Gift (published as Our Greatest Gift and Ons dagelijjks brood), Our Daily Bread (published in English as With Burning Hearts).

Ricardo. The New View : Collected Essays I and The Literature of Political Economy: Collected Essays II

Arranged together in this sub-series are records relating to Ricardo. The New View : Collected Essays I (1995) and The Literature of Political Economy: Collected Essays II (1998) This small sub-series includes notes on revisions and related correspondence as well as a 1st draft to his introductory memoir “It’s an Ill Wind…” with addendum.

Uncertain or other composer or arranger

Subseries includes manuscript scores and or parts for various ensembles. Authorship is uncertain or other than Phil Nimmons. This includes items that were arranged for ensembles led by Phil Nimmons and includes music for jazz ensemble, jazz orchestra, orchestra, jazz combo, incidental music for radio plays, music for clarinet, and music for tenor.

South America

The subseries includes menus from countries in the South American continent including Argentina, Bolivia, Peru and Venezuela.

Menus feature Japanese, Chinese, Vietnamese and Thai cuisine.

Materials regarding Seward Hiltner

Sub-series consists of articles and materials collected by Nouwen on Seward Hiltner. Materials were likely collected while Nouwen was at Notre Dame University and at Yale Divinity School. The material was likely collected for use in courses that Nouwen was teaching from 1967 to 1975 at Notre Dame, the Joint Pastoral Institute in Amsterdam, Catholic Theological Institute of Utrecht, and Yale. The courses were on the topic of Pastoral Care. The material might also have informed Nouwen's Theology degree, but this needs more research. In a letter in the file titled "Nouwen correspondence regarding Hiltner material" Nouwen writes, "I am presently involved in research concerning Seward Hiltner, and am trying to collect as many of his writings as possible."
Seward Hiltner (1909 - 1984) was an American Presbyterian minister who lived his life and work focused on the interface between psychology and theology. He believed that the two disciplines are vital to each other and that together they were a decisive force in shaping pastoral care and counseling. In addition to many other positions, Hiltner was the theological consultant for the Menninger Clinic as well as executive secretary for the Council of Clinical Training of Theological Students (founded by Boisen in 1930).

APO C-II deficiency research

Series contains material documenting specific studies and general research within the Studies of Familial Apolipoprotein CII Deficiency project. Initiated in 1977, the project aimed to study family members with apolipoprotein C-II deficiencies in order to establish the clinical and genetic characteristics of the condition. Lead investigators were Diane Wilson Cox, Carl Breckenridge, and Alick Little. The project also included collaborative studies with external researchers. Included in the material are records related to the APO CII Deficient Pedigree Study and the Apoloprotein CII deficiency: An investigation of abnormalities of Lipids and Lipoproteins and the Anemia of Homozygotes project as well as documentation of field trips to the United States (Texas. Records include proposals, correspondence with patients, fellow researchers and doctors, patient records, data print-outs, family study questionnaires, lab results, and reports.

Population (Prevalence) Studies

Series contains records documenting research performed as part of the Toronto McMaster Lipid Research Clinics Population (Prevalence) Studies. Comprised of a number of individual studies, the project analyzed data from more than 8,200 subjects from both Hamilton and Toronto over two visits. Material within the series includes progress reports from the initial visits in addition to representing specific component studies. Component studies included in the sub-series are morbidity and mortality follow-up studies, high-density lipoproteins triglyceride (HDL-TG) risk factor analysis, and the Toronto Hamilton Comparison Study. Records includes data, notes, correspondence, typescripts and tables.

Coronary Primary Prevention Trial (CPPT) and other studies

Series consists of five files related to the Coronary Primary Prevention Trial (CPPT). The trial tested whether lowering plasma cholesterol would prevent fatal and non-fatal heart attacks. The clinical trial was conducted at the Toronto McMaster Lipid Research Centre as well as eleven other US centres. Series also includes a proposal for a second analysis for nutrient intake. Records include notes, summaries of results, speaking notes from a 1984 press conference, and commentary of published CPPT findings and data tape documentation.

School certificates

Sub-series consists of eighteen documents certifying Nouwen's completion of courses, degrees and programmes.

The Economics of Thomas Robert Malthus

The Economics of Thomas Robert Malthus (1997) is another of Hollander’s books in his continued study of the classical economists and like its predecessors, especially Ricardo, is poised to set off debate. Economist A.M.C. Waterman, in his article “Reappraisal of ‘Malthus the Economist’, 1933-97” (History of Political Economy 30:2 1998 pp 293-334) in which he reviews important literature surrounding Malthus, writes:

It is quite possible that scholars of the twenty-first century will come to regard Hollander on Malthus as the most important book in the history of economic analysis since Schumpeter 1954… And like most other books Hollander has so far produced, his latest will get its fair share of controversy and disagreement.

Included are various generations of drafts as well as early research and papers on Malthus.

R.S. Wright Articles

My sabbatical in 1979-80 was to be devoted to the process of law reform. While in Israel in the fall working on codification of the criminal law, I became interested in R.S. Wright and his Jamaica Code. I couldn’t discover very much about it. I wanted to add it as a footnote to what I was writing. Professor Yoram Schachar, then at the Hebrew University, urged me to go to the Public Record Office in London, where he had done work (file 4) and where I had never been. When I got to England at the end of December 1979 I went to the PRO at Kew Gardens. I spent most of the remaining part of the sabbatical working on the RS Wright story comparing his code with that of James Fitzjames Stephen (files 2-12). In the end, rather than one footnote, it had 324 footnotes (file 12). It was the first time that I told a story and I enjoyed the archival work so much that it led naturally to my later murder books.

The article, “R.S. Wright’s Model Criminal Code--a Forgotten Chapter in the History of the Criminal Law,” was published in the new Oxford Journal of Legal Studies (file 12). It is my favourite article by far. I gave a talk on it--‘Old and New Criminal Codes’--at the University of Windsor and at other law Schools (files 14 and 16). The Windsor talk was published in the Law Society of Upper Canada Gazette (file 15). In 1990, I gave a talk at the Washington meeting of the Society for the Reform of the Criminal Law on Codification in the Commonwealth, based on the Wright story, which was published in the Criminal Law Forum (files 17-19).

Books by Nouwen

Sub-series consists of hard and soft cover books or booklets written by Nouwen or containing Nouwen's words, published between 1969 and 1996. The Archives has a variety of editions, printings and translations of his books. It is not certain how Nouwen obtained most of the English versions since, other than a handful of presentation copies, few were personally inscribed to him. Although it may be presumed that some were publisher gifts, since many of the books still have their price tags, it is possible that they were purchased by Nouwen or his associates.

Religious artifacts

Sub-series consists of religious artifacts owned by Henri Nouwen but not a part of the collected materials from his office, including psalms and prayers, rosary beads, stoles, vessels, large wooden crucifix, a tabernacle, and a gold chalice.

Orbis Books files

Sub-series consists of seven files which deal with Nouwen's personal and professional dealings with Orbis Books, a publishing company located in Maryknoll, New York. Much of the correspondence is between Nouwen or his assistants and Robert Ellsberg, Editor-in-Chief for Orbis Books. Specific Nouwen publications mentioned in the files include Walk with Jesus: Stations of the Cross (also referred to as I Walk with Jesus), Gracias, A Cry for Mercy: Prayers from the Genesee, With Burning Hearts: A Meditation on the Eucharistic Life, Love in a Fearful Land, and Ukrainian Journal.

Research and teaching files

Comments on and revisions to manuscripts, book reviews, essay topics and reading lists for courses, subject correspondence files, microfilm copies (3 reels, 35mm.) of manuscripts in the PRO (“Reflections on the Roman Commonwealth) – [manuscript attributed to Locke but identical w. Walter Moyle’s Essay Upon the Roman Clth.], the Bodleian Library (Locke Ms e, “Treatise on the Civil Magistrate [autumn 1660]), and the Library of Union Theological Seminary, New York (McAlpin Collection: 1. Overton: An Arrow; 2. Lilburne: Rash Oaths; 3. To the supreme authority.)

Phases

Ontario Government Records on Constitutional Renewal records relate to a variety of meetings and groups (including those in other subseries) that were kept by Prof. Cameron, typically in chronological order (ex. one file per month) or by project phases. These files include minutes, draft reports, briefing books, correspondence, and other records.

Administration, publication and research

Sub-series consists of background research and files related to the administration of Prof. Hassanpour’s Peasant Movement Project. Research material includes annotated copied of local newspapers, notes on topics including peasant movements in the Middle East and abroad, feudalism, the history of Kurdistan, and an analysis of the interviews. Also included within the sub-series is administrative correspondence with participants, as well as draft manuscripts and editing notes.

Transcripts, questionnaires, and recordings

Sub-series includes transcripts, questionnaires, and recordings from the Kurdish oral history project which Professor Hassanpour designed and led as part of his historiography of the Peasant Movement in Mukriyan Kurdistan.

Verlag Herder files

Sub-series consists of fourteen files which deal with Nouwen's personal and professional dealings with Verlag Herder, a publishing company located in Freiburg, Germany. Much of the correspondence is between Nouwen/his assistants and Franz Johna, Editor for Verlag Herder. Specific Nouwen publications mentioned in the files include A Cry for Mercy, Gracias, A Letter of Consolation, Aging, In Memoriam, Reaching Out, The Living Reminder, Clowning in Rome (also referred to as the Circus book), The Wounded Healer, The Way of the Heart, Behold the Beauty of the Lord (also referred to as the Icon book), Letters to Marc [about Jesus], The Road to Daybreak, In the Name of Jesus, The Return of the Prodigal Son (referred to as The Prodigal Son and Canvas of Love), Heart Speaks to Heart, Creative Ministry, Beyond the Mirror (referred to as A Glimpse Beyond the Mirror), Show Me the Way: Readings for Each Day of Lent (referred to as the Lenten book), The Life of the Beloved (also referred to as Becoming the Beloved), With Burning Hearts: A Mediation on the Eucharistic life (also referred to as the Eucharist book), Our Greatest Gift (also referred to as The Ultimate Gift and Dying Well/Caring Well), Here & Now and In the House of the Lord (referred to as In God's House - later published as Lifesigns), as well as Bob Durback's Seeds of Hope: A Henri Nouwen Reader and Returning: God's Love Call us Home (a Lenten booklet first published by Creative Communications).

Progress without planning: the economic history of Ontario from Confederation to the Second World War (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1987)

B1995-0013/013: Chapters 1 to 14: drafts and correspondence, 1981-1986
B1995-0013/014: Chapters 15 to 19; appendices, figures. Drafts and correspondence, 1980-1985
B1995-0013/015: Final drafts of manuscript with editor's marks and comments of D.G. Paterson, ca 1987. See also correspondence regarding this publication in Box /007(06-07)

Lipski

In the Spring of 1981, I started looking for a project that would build on my interest in Mr. Justice James Fitzjames Stephen, who had played a prominent role in the article on criminal codes that I had completed on my sabbatical in 1979-80. I knew that Stephen had been involved in a number of interesting murder cases, such as the Maybrick case. I started to play around with a plot, perhaps a fictional one, that would involve Stephen, the Maybrick murder case, and Stephen’s son, J.K. Stephen, who may have been Jack the Ripper. In the course of this speculative investigation I came across the Lipski case. (See file 10.)

I had earlier seen brief references to the Lipski case that Stephen had tried in 1887, but did not know much about it except for the fact that Lipski was a Polish Jew and was hanged for murder. I looked through the London Times microfilm of the case that took place over the summer of 1887. The case was a fascinating one and I wrote to England to see if there were records on the case. They had records and even though they were closed for 100 years they would make them available for me. I was going over to England that summer to give a paper at the Cambridge Lectures and made arrangements to view the documents at the Home Office (file 2). The papers were very extensive (files 88-93) and there was also a transcript of the two-day trial (files 94 & 95). I arranged to have the documents copied and sent to me in Canada.

I quickly concluded that the case was an excellent one to explore the frailty of the criminal process and various other issues that interested me, such as Jewish immigration to England. It would also enable me to show the danger of capital punishment. One of the files I have included in this collection contains notes that I made in the 1960s on the issue of capital punishment (file 3).

There were, of course, many documents in other libraries and archives (file 4). The Cambridge Library, for example, contained the Stephen papers -- papers that I had used in the R. S. Wright article -- which included letters that Stephen had sent to his wife in the country during the trial and which showed what was going through his mind during the trial and in the later fight for a reprieve.

John Atkinson, a law student, was my research assistant that summer and did excellent work in helping me find material putting the case in the social and economic context of the times. He also helped me the following summer in Canada as well as in London where he spent a month in various libraries (See file 8.). (John died from cancer shortly after graduating from Law School. I gave the eulogy at his funeral. It has not been easy sorting through the file containing his notes.) Another excellent research assistant was Stephen Perry, who had just graduated from the Law School and had returned to Oxford to complete his doctorate in jurisprudence. (He is now
teaching at the University of Pennsylvania Law School.)He visited various archives for me in England in the fall of 1981 (file 9).

There was extensive correspondence with a large number of persons who had expertise in the various subjects covered in the manuscript (files 5 to 7). Some were experts on immigration to England, some on life in the East End of London, some on W. T. Stead, the journalist, who played a prominent role in the case, some on locked-door murder mysteries, and many others topics.

I have kept only a small part--perhaps about 10%--of my research files dealing with the case. Most had been culled earlier. Those kept include a number of spiral binders which show, to some extent, the chronological development of my ideas (files 10-13) and various specific files that may be of particular interest to future researchers. These include research on Jack the Ripper, locked-door mysteries, Rabbi Simeon Singer, W. T. Stead, and immigration matters (files 14-24).

There is no complete hand-written draft of the manuscript. It seems that I had my secretary type short hand-written sections after I had completed them. Some of these early drafts that I did keep are contained in various files in the collection (files 1, 25, 26, and 30).

In early drafts I gave away in the opening the fact that Lipski was hanged (see file 1). In later drafts, however, I decided that because virtually no one knew the Lipski case, I would keep back from the reader the fact that he was hanged, although I would state at the outset that he was convicted. The drama in the case would therefore turn on the issue of whether there would be a reprieve.

The book went through various typed and word-processed drafts (files 27-29, 53-56). The endnotes were done after the text was completed (files 30-38). There is considerable correspondence relating to pictures that were used in the book and for the slides that I later used in the various talks that I gave (files 57-60).

Macmillan London agreed to publish the book in December 1982 and a contract was concluded in 1983 (files 39-46). A number of other publishers had turned it down (file 50). Box 3 contains the various matters pertaining to publication such as author’s publicity sheets and catalogues. I was particularly pleased to have Macmillan London publish the book because they were Stephen’s publishers a hundred years earlier. Subsequently arrangements were made to have Macmillan Canada distribute the book in Canada at a reasonable price (file 48). The American rights were finally sold to Beaufort Books (file 49). No paperback edition was brought out (file 47). In 1995 copyright in the book reverted to the author (file 46).

A selection from the book appeared in the Canadian lawyer and in 1995 it was given the Crime Writers of Canada Award for Non-fiction for 1984 and was short-listed for the English Crime Writer’s Dagger Award for Non-fiction (files 51 and 52). I gave many talks with slides on the book, and did a number of radio interviews (Peter Gzowski and Vikki Gabereau, etc.) (See files 72 & 73.)

The book was widely reviewed in England, Canada, and the United States (files 65-69). The files contain extensive correspondence after publication (files 62-64), including correspondence with some of the reviewers (file 70) and correspondence with respect to the W. T. Stead Society.

There are a large number of files in box 45 dealing with possible movies. An Australian company, the principal of which was the murdered women’s granddaughter, took an option on the book and came fairly close to getting the financing for a movie (files 75-84). It had some of the leading character actors in England, such as John Mills and Leo McKern, lined up to play roles in the movie (file 83). A number of Canadian directors and producers, such as Pat Ferns and Beryl Fox, took an interest in the project, but nothing concrete developed. An American company also took an interest in the book, but again, nothing came of it (file 85). As I state later with respect to my other murder books, I’m still hoping!

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