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John Herbert Milnes fonds

  • UTA 1584
  • Fonds
  • 1930-1951

Personal records of John Herbert Milnes, as a student in Arts at Trinity College (1934-1941) and in the University Extension program (1951), and as a member of No. 4 Company, University of Toronto Contingent, Canadian Officers Training Corps (1940-1946), consisting of certificates, notes, training manuals and other publications relating primarily to his military service.

Milnes, John Herbert

Manuscripts and publications

Series contains manuscripts and publications that McKay either wrote or kept in his files. Although the majority of pieces address scientific matters, the series also includes a Junior Prize Essay (“Fathers Versus Sons”) that McKay wrote while still in high school. A number of pieces, including the aforementioned “Fathers Versus Sons,” are to be found in journals or magazines, which have been included in the fonds both so as to preserve context and because many of them are no longer in print. It is worth noting that four of the articles in the series were coauthored, rather than sole-authored, by McKay. These are: “The Decay of Nitrogen Afterglow,”
“”The Decay of the Populations of Metastable Atoms and Ions from the Same D-C. Discharge in Neon,” “Effect of Previous History on Switching Rate in Ferrites,” and “The Hall Effect and Resistivity in Tellurium.” The series also includes McKay’s PhD dissertation, The Measurement of the Dialectric Constant of Electrolytes, and the high school physics textbook he co-authored with D.G. Ivey and which his sister, Marjorie, illustrated.

Ken Koyama Papers

  • CA OTUTF MS COLL 00670
  • Manuscript Collection
  • 1987-1992

Small collection of printed material regarding Japanese Canadian immigrants after WWII .

Koyama, Ken

Publishing

This series contains mainly galleys of pasted text for what is presumed to be Kaleidoscopes: selected writings of H.S.M. Coxeter. It also includes approximately 150-200 geometrical drawings, some original, others printed, but presumably most drawn by Coxeter for his many publications. Finally one file contains a typescript entitled “Summary of the first six chapters of Coxeter’s Projective Geometry, 1964”.

Series also contains copies of Professor Coxeter's publications on mathematical problems that have been translated into other languages. This series does not contain any manuscripts to any of the 12 books Coxeter wrote. Series 2, Professional Correspondence, contains some correspondence with publishers regarding some of his books.

Lorraine C. Smith fonds

  • UTA 1787
  • Fonds
  • 1949-1959

Student course notes, exercises, laboratory reports, examinations, and other records relating to Dr. Smith's undergraduate and graduate courses as a student in physiology, biochemistry, physics, etc at the University of Toronto.

Smith, Lorraine C.

Stuart Grenville Hennessey fonds

  • UTA 1371
  • Fonds
  • 1920-1985

Personal records of Dr. Hennessey documenting his academic activities as professor in Dept. of Political Economy, especially with Extension and Professional Association education. Includes correspondence (1949-1985), lecture notes and course outlines (1933-1983); student assignments, student marks, essays and examinations (printed) (1924-1983); subject files; photographs.

Hennessey, Stuart Grenville

Henri Nouwen fonds

  • CA ON00389 F4
  • Fonds
  • 1910 - 1997, 1964 - 1996 predominant

Fonds consists of 15 series:

  1. Manuscripts
  2. General files
  3. Calendar files
  4. Personal records
  5. Publisher files
  6. Financial files
  7. Teaching materials
  8. Nouwen’s education records and study notes
  9. Published works
  10. Video recordings of Nouwen
  11. Sound recordings
  12. Collected materials
  13. L'Arche Daybreak administrative files
  14. Ephemera and artifacts
  15. Photographs

Nouwen, Henri J.M.

University of Toronto. Division of University Extension

Includes minutes of the Division (1907-1963) and Staff Committees (1955-1968); correspondence and subject files (1947-1973); printed material, notably lists of Extension Lectures (1914-1946), calendars and circulars; and two sound recordings of the Senate Committee on Extension (1971). Annual reports (1955-56, 1967-68)

Gordon Neil Patterson fonds

  • UTA 1646
  • Fonds
  • 1930-1991

Fonds consists of records documenting the activities of Dr. Gordon Neil Patterson, founder and first Director of the Institute for Aeronautical Studies at the University of Toronto. Consists of three accessions of records:
-B1984-0021: Twenty-five bound volumes containing correspondence, minutes, memoranda, notes, reports, manuscripts, publications, lectures, addresses, graphs, diagrams, drawings and photoprints assembled by Professor Patterson for his book, Pathway to Excellence: UTIAS -- the first twenty-five years (1977); bound photocopied volume of the Book of Aeronauts (1945). (1935-1974; 9 boxes)
-B1993-0040: Manuscripts, publications, notes, and correspondence relating to the activities of Professor Patterson in his capacity as an aeronautical engineer in England, Australia and as Director of the Institute for Aeronautical Studies at the University of Toronto. (1934-1991; 5 boxes and 1 oversized folder)
-B1995-0012: Correspondence, certificates, contracts, addresses, drafts of articles and books (including audiotapes), and photoprints (1930-1990; 9 boxes, 3 oversized folders, 6 audio cassette tapes)

Patterson, Gordon Neil

Cody Family 1974 accession

Personal copies of books belonging to Dr. Henry John Cody:

  • Hardie, Martin and Warner Allen. "Our Italian Front", with the following material tipped in: a letter from Charles Hamilton Mitchell, Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering, who was associated with the authors in Italy with British military intelligence during World War I, with a black and white photoprint of himself.

  • Pepper, George Wharton. "Philadephia Lawyer: an autobiography", with scattered paragraphs marked for special attention and the following material tipped in: Convocation programme for the conferring by the U of T of the degree of Doctor of Laws (honoris causa) on Senator Pepper, and a press clipping reviewing a similar autobiography, "Confessions of an Un-common Attorney", by Reginald L. Hines.

Univerisity of Toronto. International Student Centre fonds

  • UTA 1893
  • Fonds
  • 1948-1970

This fonds contains 2 accessions from the Univerisity of Toronto's International Student Centre. See accession-level description for details.

Univerisity of Toronto. International Student Centre

University of Toronto. Centre of Criminology fonds

  • UTA 0014
  • Fonds
  • 1962-1980

This fonds contains 3 accessions of records from the Centre of Criminology. See accession-level descriptions for details.

University of Toronto. Centre for Criminology

A. S. P. Woodhouse fonds

  • UTA 1970
  • Fonds
  • 1885-1966

Fonds consists of 6 accessions of records and published materials documenting A. S. P. Woodhouse's career as an English scholar and professor at the University of Toronto. Includes: correspondence, notes, notebooks, course materials, drafts and typescripts. See accession-level descriptions for further information.

Woodhouse, Arthur Sutherland Pigott

Education

Omond Solandt attended Mulvey School in Winnipeg from 1915 to November 1920, when his family moved to Toronto. He then attended Rosedale Junior Public School, transferring to Central Technical School in 1922. For his last year of high school he attended Jarvis Collegiate.

He enrolled at the University of Toronto in 1927, as an undergraduate at Victoria College. He graduated with a BA in 1931 with first class honours in biological and medical sciences. Omond

Atomic bomb

In September, 1945 the British Chiefs of Staff were invited by their American counterparts to send a mission to Japan to study the effects of the atomic bomb. Omond Solandt was loaned to the Scientific Advisor to the Army Council in the War Office to go as his representative. He went as a specialist in damage to military installations but, there being none of significance in Hiroshima or Nagasaki, spent most of his time studying the casualties from a medical perspective.

This series includes Dr. Solandt

Operational research

Dr. Solandt was one of the pioneers in operational research, a new sphere of scientific activity which arose from the particular wartime requirements for solutions to complex questions, some highly technical, and most involving the interaction between men and machines. By 1944 Solandt had become head of the British Army

Canadian National Railways

In the latter months of 1955, Omond Solandt began arranging his departure from the Defence Research Board to take up the position of Vice-President, Research and Development of Canadian National Railways, a position he held from 1 March, 1956 to 1 July, 1963.

This series contains correspondence, addresses, press clippings, reports, articles and photoprints (see Series 46) relating largely to the scientific research carried out by the Research and Development Department.

De Havilland Aircraft of Canada Ltd.

Upon leaving Canadian National in 1963, Dr. Solandt became Vice-President, Research and Development for and a director of de Havilland and Hawker-Siddeley Canada Ltd., and Chairman of the Board of DCF Systems Ltd. At the time he left de Havilland in 1966 he was Vice-President, Research and Planning.

This series contains correspondence, diaries, memoranda, and reports relating to his activities with these companies and their parent company, the Hawker Siddeley Group of Great Britain.

Electric Reduction Company of Canada Ltd.

From de Havilland, Dr. Solandt moved on to the position of Vice-Chair of the Electric Reduction Company of Canada (later ERCO), a subsidiary of Allbright & Wilson Ltd. of England, which he held from 1965 until 31 December, 1970.

This series contains correspondence, press clippings, articles, minutes, memoranda, reports, and photoprints.

Wilderness Research Foundation

During the late 1980s the future of the Quetico-Superior Wilderness Research Center at Mukluk Bay, Minnesota was very much in question. The Wilderness Research Foundation, which sponsored it, was assessing its future at a time when its founder was withdrawing from active participation prior to his death in December, 1988. Dr. Solandt was initially a member of the Advisory Committee to the Board of the Foundation and later a member of the Board. He pressed for the continuation of wilderness research at Mukluk Bay and left the Board in 1991 only when he felt that this would be achieved.

The correspondence, minutes, memoranda and reports written by Dr. Solandt and others, along with articles and institutional reports, clearly document the relationship between the Foundation and the Center, the work done by the latter, the problems it faced, and the policies that were developed in an attempt to save it.

Canada/Newfoundland Royal Commission on the Ocean Ranger Marine Disaster

When the Ocean Ranger oil rig tipped over in the Atlantic on 15 April, 1982, it set in motion an inquiry which involved two royal commissions, one federal and the other provincial (Newfoundland) which, due to a public outcry, were forced to amalgamate. David Grenville, secretary of the Commission, drew on advice from Dr. Solandt for the second volume of the report, which addressed safety on the oil rigs. An important part of this exercise was the convening of a conference in St. John

Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical/International Centre for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT)

The Centro Internactional de Agricultura Tropical was founded by the Rockefeller Institute in 1967 in Cali, Columbia. In 1982 a massive fraud was discovered within the organization, with the result that the World Bank in 1984 retained Omond Solandt to conduct a management review of the Centre.

The files in this series provide a good picture of the conduct of the External Management Review and of its results. Included are the Review Team

West African Rice Development Association (WARDA)

The initial aim of WARDA was to have an entirely native West African organization that would apply the latest in rice technology to the problems peculiar to their area, but political interference meant that WARDA never functioned effectively. By the end of 1986, with CGIAR having resolved to continue its support of the organization, Omond Solandt was asked to coach those involved in it on how to operate within a CG style of centre. In 1987 he made three trips to Africa and, while there and in subsequent meetings, worked to ensure that an effective structure and Board were put in place. His official involvement with WARDA ended about August, 1987.

The correspondence, minutes, background papers, reports, photographs and publications provide detailed information about the problems WARDA faced and the problems Solandt and others encountered in resolving them.

University of Toronto. Faculty of Medicine. Office of the Dean

Consists of records of Dean John Dirks, including subject files on companies, committees, associations, institutes, medical chairs, curriculum, departments, faculties, schools, medical specialties, political entities, foreign visits, as well as external review files on hospitals and medical departments and search files for directors, chairs and chiefs.

Report on the possibility and desirability of love

This item consists of a two page article by Henri Nouwen entitled: On the possibility and desirability of love, published in The National Catholic Reporter, April 10. 1968, pp. 7-8. Nouwen begins his article by asking if love is possible at all. ‘Is there a spark of misunderstanding in every intimate encounter, a painful experience of separateness in every attempt to unite, a fearful resistance in every act of surrender?’ He then states that he intends to describe what he calls two main forms of existing: 1) a power or ‘taking’ form and 2) a forgiving form. He then finally intends to ask the crucial questions, ‘Is love a utopian dream or a possibility within our reach?’ There are three major headings in the article: 1) The taking form, 2) The forgiving form and 3)The possibility of love. In 1) Nouwen describes the taking form as a form of power. We objectify the other, we try to control, to manipulate vulnerabilities and weaknesses and classify and label others. ‘This leaves us with the suspicion that the reality which we call “love” is nothing other than a blanket to cover the real fact that a man and a woman conquer each other in a long, subtle skirmish of taking movements in which one is always the winner who manipulates the other… we find ourselves doomed to the impossibility of love’. In 2) Nouwen describes the forgiving form as one of trust, openness and vulnerability. He suggests some characteristics of love. Love is truthful, tender and asks for total disarmament. He asks: ‘Can we ever meet a fellow man without any protection? Reveal ourselves to him in our total vulnerability? In 3) The possibility of love, Nouwen attempts to answer these questions. He begins by noting that life is often a very painful fluctuation between the two desires to take and to forgive. ‘And we have good reasons to be afraid. Love means openness, vulnerability and confession.’ Again, Nouwen asks if real love is possible and answers by saying that it is not if ‘the only real and final solution to life is death’. He then points to the person who he suggests has broken through the vicious circle and quotes from the prologue to the Gospel of John which speaks of Jesus breakthrough. ‘Suddenly everything is converted into its opposite. Darkness into light, enslavement into freedom, death into life, taking into giving, destruction into creation and hatred into love’. He concludes by stating that ‘the core of the Christian message is exactly this message of the possibility of transcending the taking form of our human existence.

The death of Dr. King

This item consists of a one page article by Henri Nouwen entitled: The Death of Dr King, published in the National Catholic Reporter, December 18, 1968, p. 4. This article is a subjective reflection by Nouwen on the atmosphere, experience and people he encountered following the death of Dr Martin Luther King Jr. on April 4, 1968. Nouwen uses a number of headings : 1) The News – this begins in Chicago where he first hears of King’s assassination. He describes the muted responses of the people he meets, 'Martin Luther King was dead, killed, assassinated. Everybody knew it but nobody wanted to know it'. 2) The Party – Here Nouwen describes the atmosphere at a party following his talk and notes particularly that most people are avoiding speaking of Dr King’s death. 3) The Cool City – moves on to Topeka, Kansas where Nouwen reflects on the contrast between the ‘slickness and artificiality’ and ‘the madness’. ‘We were killing the prophets…Between the hollow voices of those who tried to advertise their latest product, it became clear that violence was cutting through the thresholds of restraint. Topeka seemed a cool and indifferent city’. 4) In Kansas City Nouwen visits a young man in prison for draft evasion. This young man speaks of the influence of Dr King on his life and the lives of his fellow prisoners and the atmosphere in the prison: ’when they heard that he was dead they doubled the guards. They did not understand that we were just crying, my Afro-American friends and me’. 5) The Cab Driver –this speaks of Nouwen’s decision to change his plans and travel to Atlanta for the funeral. He describes his encounter at the airport with a cab driver who is also going. The cab driver shares with Nouwen: ‘ Dr King just tried to take Christ’s words seriously. He realized he had to follow him all the way. What would happen if we really would do just that?’ The remainder of the article describes the atmosphere in Atlanta: ‘It was a special occasion in which happiness and joy merged with sadness and distress. Perhaps it had never been different for them.’ Nouwen concludes this article by reflecting on his hope despite all the ‘anger, grief and frustration’. ‘I knew that out of my exhaustion a new faith could grow, a faith that it is possible to love’.

Find your center

This item is a half page article by Henri Nouwen entitled: Find Your Center, published in the National Catholic Reporter, May 3, 1974. This article is a continuation of Nouwen’s article from the National Catholic Reporter, April 26, 1974. He introduces this article by saying,” To live a Christian life means to live in the world without being of it. It is in solitude that this inner freedom can grow”. The entire article is a development of his statement that” A life without a lonely place, that is, a life without a quiet center,, easily becomes destructive since by clinging to the results of our actions as our only way of self-identification we become possessive and defensive and tend to look at our fellow human beings more as enemies to be kept at a distance than as friends with whom we share the gifts of life”. Nouwen discusses the importance to Jesus of his times of solitude and silence which fed his ministry and enabled him to face his death. The article concludes,” When you are somewhere able to create the lonely place in the middle of your actions and concerns, your successes or failures can slowly lose some of their powers over you.”

Protecting intimacy

This item is a half page article by Henri Nouwen entitled, ‘Protecting Intimacy’ published in the National Catholic Reporter, May 10, 1974. Nouwen begins this article by stating,”A most painful thing to say is that intimate love does not take our loneliness away but protects it and converts it into solitude. Therefore intimacy is first of all a protecting intimacy allowing us to move from loneliness to solitude.” Nouwen then goes on to give an example of a family whose mode of living is to avoid pain in their relationships. Nouwen suggests that “this world is full of lonely people trying hard to love each other without succeeding. The question is if this is not largely due to the fact that we are not able to face the pain of our loneliness”. Nouwen concludes by stating,“ Intimacy,..does not mean entering the other with an intruding curiosity or a hungry need for satisfaction. Intimacy touches gently, intimacy does not take, but gives, does not suffocate but lets grow, does not conquer and possess but sets free and keeps free.”

Out of solitude, healing

This item is a half-page article by Henri Nouwen entitled, Out of Solitude, Healing, published in the National Catholic Reporter, c. May 24, 1974. Renewing the theme of solitude from his previous articles (April and May) Nouwen states, “In solitude history becomes Kairos, which means history converts from a random collection of disconnected events into a constant opportunity for a change of heart and mind”. He goes on to say in clarification, “When history becomes Kairos, I am called to search for hope even in the middle of crying cities, burning hospitals and desperate parents and children”. Kairos, Nouwen suggests brings the depths of the heart into the actions of mind and hand; in Kairos which we touch in solitude, our actions are transformed. Nouwen concludes, “Every time in history that men and women have been able to respond to the manifestations of evil and death as to a Kairos, a historic opportunity, an inexhaustible source of generosity and new life has been opened, offering hope far beyond the limits of human prediction”.

Openness can get stale

This item is a half-page article by Henri Nouwen entitled ‘Openness can get Stale’ published in the National Catholic Reporter, June 21, 1974, p. 13. Nouwen begins the article by stating, ‘There is a false form of honesty that suggests nothing should remain hidden and everything should be said, expressed and communicated’. The article suggests that a lack of boundaries in relationships and a lack of silence and solitude can lead to a violation of our ‘inner sanctuary’. Nouwen writes that for all the openness we offer to one another there is however, still a ‘desire for protective boundaries by which man and woman do not have to cling to each other but can move graciously in and out of each other’s circle’. He then asks how we can find the road to conversion, ‘the conversion from loneliness into solitude. Instead of running away from my loneliness and trying to forget or deny it, I have to carefully protect it and turn it into a fruitful solitude’. Nouwen ends the article with a reference to his own struggles with this issue and concludes by stating, ‘The few times however in which I followed the counsel of my severe masters and listen silently to my restless heart I started to sense that in the middle of my sadness there was joy, that in the middle of my fears there was peace, that in the middle of my greediness there was compassion and that indeed in the middle of my irking loneliness I could find the beginnings of a quiet solitude’

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