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Education and career

Series consists of records relating to Prof. Cook’s secondary and post-secondary education and career, including grant, fellowship and some project files.

Education records include secondary school certificates and exam results, her application for admission to the University of Toronto, course syllabi, reading lists, examinations, notes on nineteenth-century thought by Prof. A.S.P. Woodhouse, and Prof. Cook’s convocation program. Employment records include letters of offer, contracts, clippings, evaluations, and correspondence. Grant and fellowship records include applications, correspondence, reports, and clippings.

Series also includes project files relating to Prof. Cook’s work with Representative Poetry Online and the Online Poetry Classroom Project of the Academy of American Poets.

Certificates

Series contains educational certificates, including certificates for passing entrance exams, grade promotion certificates, graduation certificates, teaching certifications, and grade reports.

Professional Correspondence - Letters of reference

This series consists of inward and outward correspondence regarding references for former students, arranged alphabetically by surname in two groups for the period 1981-1987. One file contains letters of reference for 1973-1974

Publishing

Series consists of records related to the publishing activity of Prof. Venkatacharya. Material includes typescripts, annotated drafts, and some off-prints. Also included is correspondence related to Prof. Venkatacharya’s publisher.

Teaching

Series consists of records related to Prof. Frederick Winter’s teaching both at the University of Toronto and the American School of Classical Studies at Athens. Records include syllabi, lecture notes, class assignments, and hand-outs, as well as agendas, reports and other administrative documentation related to Winter’s time at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens.

Personal and biographical

Series consists of the personal and biographical records of Joan Hay including diaries, notes and exercise books from her early education, and memorabilia from the University of Alberta.

Travel diaries

Series consists of diaries kept by Joan Winter from research trips in Europe taken by her and her husband, Frederick Winter. Content covers trips to various sites across Europe including those with students, notes on artifacts, listings of photographs taken, and additional noted travel details.

Research, publications and presentations

Series consists of records related to Joan and Frederick Winter’s archaeological research, particularly their study of Pausauias’ travels. Material includes typescripts, background research material, and images. In addition to a published article, a significant portion of the material documents the presentation of the couple’s research through scripts, a ‘photographic companion’ (annotated) album, and slides.

Addresses

Professor Franceschetti has given many public lectures and delivered many papers at conferences and seminars. Some of the latter were published and readers may want to check Series 6 for them. Additional correspondence about addresses may be found in Series 2. Only about a third of the addresses listed in Professor Franceschetti’s last curriculum vitae (April 2004) are found in this series. The files may contain any or all of the following: notices of and posters for addresses (for oversized ones, see B2009-0039/015), covering correspondence, programmes, notes for and drafts of the addresses, and posters.

Biographical

B2008-0023 consists of resumes, short biographical notes and activity reports documenting Prof. Rayside.

B2013-0015 consists of records from Prof. Rayside’s time as a university student, with most material documenting his undergraduate degree at Carleton University. This series contains correspondence, notes, drafts, submitted essays, press clippings, photographs and application forms documenting both his academic work and his extra-curricular activities including student council, the Political Science Student Union, the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Teaching and Learning and his work on the student residence constitution. Files are arranged chronologically by degree, and by activity within each degree, with academic coursework at the front and extra-curricular activities at the back. There is one file at the beginning of the series containing souvenirs unrelated to his early education.

B2017-0024 includes two short biographies on David Rayside, one of which was a contribution to MyOntario in 2017.

Correspondence

This series consists of files and electronic documents of general professional correspondence covering a period from 1991-2002. It documents various academic and political issues in which Prof. Rayside was involved. Much of the correspondence in this fonds relates specifically to documentation in other series.

University Administration

This series documents Prof. Rayside’s varied administrative positions. Files contain original correspondence and e-mails, notes, reports, minutes of meetings, and in specific cases conference programs and posters.

Records for this series found in B1998-0029 document mainly conferences organized by Prof. Rayside in his capacity as a university administrator for both the Canadian Studies Committee (1982-1984) and the European Studies Committee of the International Studies Committee (1976-1985). These include: The Individual and the State (1979), Small Town in Modern Times,(1983), 1984 in Canada: Authority, Conformity and the Policing of Citizens” (1983) The Sharon Temple and the Children of Peace”(1984), and Between Ourselves: Women’s Experiences at the University of Toronto, (1985).

Records for this series found in B2008-0023 document his role on several other committees including the Women’s’ Study Committee, Committee to establish the Equity Studies Program, New College, Vice Provost, Students Advisory Search Committee (2002), Graduate Affairs Committee, as well as several smaller committees and advisory roles. There are also three files related to his position as Vice Principal of University College.

The records for this series found in B2013-0015 document Professor Rayside’s course evaluation activities, conference organizing activities, and activities he would have performed as Acting Principal and Graduate Director including dealing with a teaching assistant strike, staffing the Political Science Department, and evaluating the graduate program in Political Science. These records also document his participation in the Diversity Working Group, Teaching Load Committee, and Principal’s Search Committee, among others. There is also a large amount of material related to creating community relations newsletters for the Department of Political Science and a collection of posters documenting conferences Prof. Rayside helped organize including : The Individual and the State (1979), Small Town in Modern Times,(1983), 1984 in Canada: Authority, Conformity and the Policing of Citizens” (1983) The Sharon Temple and the Children of Peace”(1984), and Between Ourselves: Women’s Experiences at the University of Toronto, (1985).

Records in accession B2017-0024 document Professor Rayside’s on-going involvement in the Mark S. Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies for the time period after he was director. Included are various committee files relating to public relations, curriculum and program development, budget and fundraising. There are several files documenting Raysides involvement in the World Pride Human Rights Conference 2014. There is also one box of records for the Department of Political Science, mainly relating to awards and scholarships.

Letters of Recommendation and Evaluation

The records in this series from B2008-0023 document Prof. Rayside’s roles as both a mentor to students and colleagues, as well as his role as a peer reviewer. This series consists of letters of recommendation written for students applying to scholarships, graduate schools, and employment. The correspondence covers the period from 1974 to 1995 and is grouped alphabetically. A second set of files including electronic files contain mainly reviews and evaluations. They include: letters of support for grant applications, awards, tenure and promotion; reader’s reports for peer review journals such as the Canadian Journal of Political Science as well as reviews of monographs and articles for various publishers; evaluations for both teaching assistants and Ph.D. students; and comments and evaluation for proposed research projects by peers.

The records in this series from B2013-0015 contain material documenting his academic staffing and promotions recommendations, his grant reviews, letters of recommendation he has written for students, research assessments, and research reviews as well as person or publication-specific files.

Books

This series extensively documents the publishing of books researched, written and/or edited by Prof. Rayside. For each of his published monographs, there exist manuscripts of the book at various stages of writing as well as manuscripts of related talks or papers. His ongoing relationship with publishers and grant providers is documented in correspondence, progress reports and grant applications. There is also extensive research documentation in the form of notes, transcripts of interviews and original recordings of interviewees.

Teaching

B2008-0023 consists almost entirely of electronic documents arranged by course number. Most folders contain, course syllabus giving outlines, bibliography, tests, assignments. There is also related correspondence and memos. Only Course Pol 103 contains original lectures. It also contains one box of textual records relating to Pol 315 which does contain original lecture notes as well as documents relating to the course’s development. Also included is one file of notes for a course Rayside took in 1977 with C.B. MacPherson - Pol. 200. Taking such a course as a new professor was preparatory to his teaching role.

B2013-0015 contains almost exclusively original lecture notes, with some syllabi and handouts, for the courses listed below.

B2017-0024 contains lecture notes as well as course outlines and syllabus for Pol 315 Sexual Diversity Politics (2010-2011) and lectures for Pol 364 Religion and Politics (2008-2012).

Courses documented include:
-Pol 100 [can’t find title]
-Pol 103 - Canada in Comparative Context
-Pol 222 - Elites & Political Leadership
-Pol 302 - Western European Politics
-Pol 311 - Canadian Political Parties
-Pol 315 - Sexual Diversity Politics
-Pol 344 - Social Movements in Europe and North America
-Pol 364 - Religion and Politics
-Pol 435 - [can’t find title]
-Pol 2100 - Canadian Politics
-Pol 2300 - Comparative Politics
-Pol 2810 - The Politics of Diversity: A Research Seminar

Conferences, Talks, Unpublished Papers

Records in this series include notes, drafts, correspondence and flyers related to conferences Professor Rayside attended and/or participated in, unpublished talks and workshops, and unpublished papers, as well as less formal writing. The conferences documented mostly pertain to equity issues faced by gay and lesbian populations. The talks and workshops relate to a variety of topics including political science, labour unions, gendered violence, philanthropy and diversity in the workplace and were delivered mostly at Canadian universities in the form of symposia, guest lectures and public lectures. The unpublished papers in this series relate mainly to equity issues in Canadian and American society. There is also one sound recording of Professor Rayside delivering the Kreeft Lecture on November 28, 2002.

Records in B2017-0024 included talks, panels, and conferences on subjects such as inclusion, religion in the public sphere and positive space. There is also a paper he gave at Spring Reunion in 2016 as well as a memorial for colleagues Stephen Clarkson and David Higgs.

Research notes and article drafts

Series consists of research notes, bibliographical notes, notes and rough drafts, typescripts, etc. of articles that Joan Bigwood later published. Also includes several offprints from journals of her articles. Series also consists of a selection of index cards with bibliographical notes.

Hartle Consulting Records

Included is correspondence, contracts and proposals relating to projects undertaken by Hartle Consulting Ltd. for such groups as the Economic Council of Canada, Ontario Economic Council, Department of Energy, Mines and Resources, Canada Cable Systems and the Commission of Inquiry into Residential Tenancies.

Personal files

The three files in this series contain copies of Professor Hartle's curriculum vitae, printouts of his computer directories and logs, and a list of his journals.

Education

This series begins with a single file of course notes taken by Frieda Fraser while a Form V student at Havergal College in 1915-1916. It is followed by others containing course and laboratory notes for the Physics and Biology section of the undergraduate honours Arts program at University College for second, third, and fourth year (1918-1921).

This is followed by a notebook for a biological project at St. Andrew's, New Brunswick, for the summer of 1921. It also contains a number of sketches that have no relationship to the course.

The series ends with some course and laboratory notes for the Bachelor of Medicine program at the University of Toronto.

Manuscripts, publications, and addresses

Professor Fraser had eleven scientific papers published between 1928 and 1964, though she wrote many reports and some papers that were not published. This series contains offprints of all of her published papers and a draft of one. Also included in this series is a short story she wrote in 1909, at the age of 10; a typescript of her undated "Report of a case of pernicious anemia", and an address, "D.P.T. vaccines" that she delivered on 4 December, 1964.

Research: general files

Beginning in the mid-1920s and even after her retirement in 1965, Dr. Fraser carried on research at the University of Toronto. For the first twenty years, usually with her brother, Donald, her research concentrated on the development of scarlet fever and other antitoxins. This research formed part of ongoing studies of certain aspects of infection and immunity in pneumonia, diphtheria, and scarlet fever, often in conjunction with health departments across Canada. It also involved the testing of products and the monitoring of scarlet fever outbreaks.

As the Second World War began, she started investigating the incidence of agglutinative types of strains of haemolytic streptococcus in a small scarlet fever ward at the Riverdale Isolation Hospital. Through the use of exacting technical procedures, she was able to prove the transfer of agglutinative types from one patient to another in the same ward. She continued work in this field and, in 1941-1942, by examining cultures from 650 people, was able to identify the incidence of particular types of streptococci in various groups of persons. The techniques perfected proved of particular use in studying the outbreak of scarlet fever in Royal Canadian Air Force bases across southern Ontario between 1941 and 1944. In 1942-1943 she worked on the preparation of a combined antigen containing diphtheria toxoid, tetanus toxoid, and tannic acid precipitate of scarlet fever toxin.

During the war, her research also included the development of penicillin, especially in relation to the campaign to combat venereal disease. From January, 1944, in co-operation with the penicillin committee of the armed forces, she conducted a bacteriological investigation of clinical material from patients treated with penicillin. At the same time she was actively engaged in the investigation of two antibiotics, streptothricin and streptomycin.

After the War Dr. Fraser continued her laboratory and clinical studies in antibiotics. One aspect of her research, between 1946 and 1948, was to test the effectiveness of penicillin in oil and wax in the treatment of gonorrhoea. In 1947, as a member of team including researchers from the Department of Botany, she spent much of her available time testing a group of new strain of micro-organisms for their activity against selected cultures. A number of new preparations of penicillin designed to prolong its action were also tested on laboratory animals and then on humans, this project extending into 1949. Further refinements in the testing of the effectiveness of penicillin were continued the next year.

In 1948 Dr. Fraser began a major study of antibiotic substances with special reference to tubercle bacillus and gram-negative cocci. A year later she was studying the antibiotic activity of several strains of penicillin against gram-negative bacilli of the enteric group. In 1950 she began another two-year project, studying the toxicity and protective effect of partially purified antibiotic substances isolated from fungi, utilizing
samples of Arctic soil. She also investigated the conditions for the production of antibiotics in deep culture.

In 1952 she began expanding on earlier research by exploring methods for the concentration of antibiotic from one of the strains of penicillin previously studied. The following year she was investigating methods for the electrophoresis on paper strips of vaccinia virus and a strain of bacteriophage, research that continued to be refined over the next several years with particular references to viruses. By 1957 she was beginning chemical tests of the fractions obtained by electrophoresis separation. Simple synthetic media were also developed for the propagation of phage on a non-pathogenic mycobacterium. In the late 1950s and the early 1960s Dr. Fraser's principal research was in a major project on the development of the anti-tuberculosis antigen, compound 377.

The eight boxes in this series contain research notes, background material, correspondence, data, articles and reports. The associated nine boxes of records of laboratory experiments are found in the next series.

The series begins with three boxes (019-021) of mimeographed and printed articles, and reports, and research notes on areas of interest, especially scarlet fever, tuberculosis, cultures, penicillin, electrophoresis, rheumatic fever, serum sickness, smallpox, spectrophotometry staphylococcus, streptococcus and venereal disease. The arrangement is largely alphabetical by topic.

Box 022 contains applications for, reports on, and correspondence regarding research grants for the years 1944-1964, on projects such as testing the effectiveness of penicillin, on new antibiotics, the electrophoresis of viruses, and tuberculosis vaccine trials.

Boxes 023 and 024 contain correspondence, notes, Dick, skin and lethal test results for research on scarlet fever streptococcus toxin production, and papers describing the results. Included are data for tests on rabbits, in schools, isolation hospitals, the Ontario School for the Deaf, orphanages, and students in the Public Health Nursing program at the University of Toronto. Much of this research was carried out at
the Connaught Laboratories, and the researchers corresponded with several other research institutes including the Richardson Pathological Laboratory at Queen's University.

Box 025 contains files on scarlet fever outbreaks amongst the Royal Canadian Air Force and other military personnel in bases across Ontario between 1941 and 1944. There are also more files of correspondence, notes, and reports, primarily from the 1930s and the early 1940s, on the development of scarlet fever antitoxin, on testing the effectiveness of penicillin in oil and wax in the treatment of gonorrhoea, and on the survival of streptococci and staphylococci in various products. The files from the 1950s relate largely to work on bacteria and viruses and to research methodology.

Box 026 contains the last general research files in this series. The correspondence, data, and reports are associated with a the development of compound 377. Sensitivity tests, clinical and drug trials were carried out at the Mountain Sanatorium in Hamilton, at the Toronto Hospital for Tuberculosis in Weston, and in London and Woodstock.

Personal and biographical

This series consists of a volume of Longfellow's poetry (last part, including back cover missing), with a bookplate with the coat-of-arms of the Williams family (Sir John Bickerton Williams, Kt., LLD, FSA), a certificate for the family plot in Mount Pleasant Cemetery (1916), a medical certificate for Edith (Bud) Williams from England (1927), and press clippings about her passion for mountain climbing (1962).

Tenure Documentation

This series contains two sets of documentation. The first compiled in 1976 when Prof. McIlwraith was applying for promotion to Assistant Professor. This documentation includes course files as described in Series 1 that complete this series for the years prior to 1976. Also included are copies of some of his early papers, reviews and talks often accompanied by an explanatory note meant to put the work in context to his entire output.

The second set of documentation is made up entirely of course related material, again with explanatory notes that most often fill the gap of similar course related files found in Series 1. This binder was amassed as part of the tenure review process to full professor in 1997.

Minutes and related records of the Victoria College Board

Series consists of minutes (including extracts), notes and drafts, reports and other records of the Victoria College Board. Also includes minutes of the annual meetings of ministers of the Wesleyan Methodist Church to elect Board and Officers of the College, 1862-1866. Also consists of a book created in 1869 out of the controversy between Dr. I. B. Aylesworth and some members of the Victoria College Board regarding the amount and payment of funds raised to pull the College out of debt: the book contains correspondence, resolutions, and financial statements, 1862-1869; printed statement regarding the controversy made to the Board by Dr. Aylesworth, 1873.

Personal and biographical

The material in this series consists of copies of Professor Franceschetti’s curriculum vitae, correspondence on his gaining Canadian citizenship in 1979, a folder of greeting cards and a copy of his 'dottore in lettre' thesis from the University of Padua (1963), and two certificates.

Research

Series consists of records documenting Prof. Fletcher’s research activity. It includes substantial coverage of his work within two major projects, The Charter Project and the Australian Rights Project. Series also includes additional smaller-scale studies as well as miscellaneous research files. Records relate to both the administration of these projects as well as their findings. See listing of component sections below.

Canadian attitudes towards the Charter of Rights and Freedoms: This section contains records related to research on Canadian attitudes towards civil liberties and is comprised primarily of material from the Charter Project (1986-1990) which was conducted with fellow investigators Paul Sniderman, Peter Russell, and Philip Tetlock. This research project investigated how the recent adoption of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms was reflected in Canadian attitudes towards civil liberties among various population groups. This section includes additional records from projects that followed the Charter Project and reflect Prof. Fletcher’s continued research within the area. Material includes data print-outs, draft and final surveys, indices, correspondence, notes, progress documentation, and background material.

Australian Rights Project and comparative study: The Australian Rights Project (1988-1993), led by Brian Galligan, Ian McAllister, and Joseph Fletcher, investigated the level of Australian support for civil rights and freedoms. The study evaluated the beliefs of both the general public and a population of elites, mostly those in the legal community. The project was also designed to compare its results with those in other countries, in particular Canada. Material in this section includes data-print outs, notes, correspondence, indices, granting applications and records, recruitment material, research summaries, and background research.

Task Force on Foreign Students survey (University of Toronto): Records in this section relate to a study beginning in 1984 of international students at the University of Toronto organized by the Task Force on Foreign Students. The mail survey evaluated the overall experiences of foreign students at the University looking in particular at academic, financial, and personal issues faced. Material includes data, notes, reports, and background material.

Survey of Recent and Current Doctoral Students at the University of Toronto: Records in this section relate to a survey conducted regarding the attitudes, issues, and practices surrounding doctoral dissertations at the University between 1989 and 1991. The study was organized by the Committee on the Role and Nature of the Doctoral Dissertation on behalf of the Dean of Graduate Studies. Material in this section includes data, reports, notes, surveys, and correspondence.

Miscellaneous research: Records in this section cover multiple projects and ancillary areas of research, including several survey-based projects: a recurring national election study; a 1993 referendum survey, and a survey of legal scholars and professionals. Additionally, the section includes research files on topics including party identification, Canada’s mission in Afghanistan, and same-sex marriage. Records comprise data print-outs, analysis, correspondence, reports, notes, and background material. Additionally, section contains copied and original material created by Prof. Fletcher’s former supervisor and colleague, Christian Bay.

Intermediate Dynamics (unpublished)

This series contains correspondence, notes, captions, diagrams and complete typescript of the unpublished manuscript written by Derek Paul entitled Intermediate Dynamics, a textbook for undergraduate students in physics to be published by Prentice-Hall,Inc. Chapter titles are: the principles of dynamics, particle motion in one and two dimensions, central forces, perturbations of elliptic orbits in the plans of the ellipse, particle motion in three dimensions, systems of many particles, and the rigid body and its motion in three dimensions.

For photoprints for frontespiece and chapter 5 see B1995-0020/001P(01).

Correspondence

In-coming as well as out-going correspondence was arranged by Lee in various runs. Filed at the beginning is a chronological series of files containing letters from 1967-1972. One file contains job offers from various universities in 1969-70 while another file relates to correspondence around his job offer at the University of Toronto. Apart from job offers, most of the correspondence is with colleagues world wide and is of both a professional and personal nature. Much of the early correspondence relates to field trips to the Kalahari and related research.

The second run of files is general alphabetical files with correspondence dating from about 1970 to 1975. Again this correspondence relates mainly to Prof. Lee’s research and is from colleagues and students. It includes comments on his publications and routine requests for information and advice, requests to attend seminar and talks and other professional meetings, as well as Prof. Lee’s reports or comments as a peer reviewer of papers. There are also letters of recommendation, reviews of theses and general correspondence documenting his role as a teacher.

A third run is an alphabetical run of files arranged by the correspondent. Correspondence is similar in nature to the general alphabetical files described above but is more voluminous for each person and covers a time period mainly from 1965-1975 with the bulk dating from the late 1960s to 1972. Included is correspondence with well known anthropologists such as Carl Heider (Brown University / University of Southern California), Adam Kuper (University College, London), Mary Leakey, Sidney Mintz (Yale University), Julian Steward (Colombia / University of Illinois), Sherwood Washburn (Harvard University and Lee’s advisor) and Eric Wolf (City University of New York).

Finally, Prof. Lee himself arranged a small run of correspondence files from famous people or people influential in his professional development. They include people such as Margaret Atwood and Carl Sagan as well as fellow anthropologists Philip Tobias and Bruce Trigger.

In addition to the correspondence from the 2007 donation, there is a grouping of correspondence from the 2012 addition. This is arranged alphabetically by correspondent, with occasional subject file as designated by Lee. Many of the earlier correspondents appear in this section again.

Publications

While Prof. Lee has published over a hundred papers, reviews, chapters in books as well as several books, this series contains manuscripts and typescripts for only a handful. Some of the files contain related correspondence and drafts. There are reviews written by Lee as well as correspondence with publishers especially for his Man the Hunter. Except for one paper, all date from 1965-1975. They are arranged chronologically.

Nevertheless, this series does contain the original manuscript of Prof. Lee’s acclaimed "The !Kung San: Men and Women and Work in a Foraging Society". This book was included in a list by American Scientist of important books in science for the 20th century. Under the category of “The Nature and the Rise of our own Species”, Lee’s book shares the list with books by Sigmund Freud, Mary Leaky, Noam Chomsky and Ivan P. Pavlov to name but a few.[1]

[1] Morrison, Philip and Phylis Morrison, “100 or so books that Shaped a Century of Science” in American Scientist, Fall 1999.

Teaching

This series consists of course files containing lectures, course outlines and reading lists for courses taught by Prof. at Lee at Harvard, Rutgers, the University of Toronto, the Marxist Institute, and others.

Grants

This series consists of grant proposals and their resulting paperwork, primarily from the Canada Council and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council. These include grants for Prof. Lee’s work in Africa.

Student Notebooks

These are Prof. Lee’s notebooks from when he was a student. Many of his instructors are well known in the field of anthropology or worked with Lee during his career. For some of them, their records are also held by the University of Toronto. Instructors include: Ronald Cohen, Dr. C. D. Ellis, J.N. Emerson, Dr. Nathan Keyfitz, Dr. Thomas F. MacIlwraith, Cranford Pratt, Dr. James W. Vanstone, Dr. Fred W. Voget.

Sound and Moving Images

Sound recordings and video document Prof. Lee’s research. Reel to reel tapes contain interviews, testimonies with !Kung San bushmen, talks given by Lee on this very topic, taped vocabulary lists of the !Kung San people’s language, native music from Botswana and one radio interview with Prof. Lee. Two videos document a discussion among women academics on the role of women in a hunter and gatherer society. Finally two tapes contain a partial recording of the symposium of Political Struggles of Native Peoples, organized by Prof. Lee in 1972.

Education

This series contains certificates and diplomas, correspondence, course and lab notes, term papers and memorabilia documenting aspects of Davidson Black’s education, running from the Wellesley School through Harbord Collegiate and the Faculties of Medicine and Arts at the University of Toronto. There is also a file on Davidson’s summer project in 1907 to earn money for his Bachelor of Arts program, prospecting in the Temagami Forest Reserve.

Publications and addresses

This series documents only one of Davidson Black’s publications, but more of his addresses, in particular some he delivered in 1925 before his discovery of Peking Man, and the Croonian Lecture in December 1932 that cemented the acceptance of his research.

Published Manuscripts

This Series consists of articles, reviews and monographs written by Harold Innis. Includes chapters of books, which also appeared as journal articles, annotated versions of chapters and articles, and several revisions of his book "Empire and Communications".

University of Toronto

This Series consists of files relating to his departmental activities at the University, and to the "Values" Discussion Group of which Innis was a member.

Research and reference material

Series consists of bound and loose leaf research and reference notes handwritten and typed by Douglas Ellory Pett relating to his thesis and extensive research on the early Anglican sermons of John Henry Newman. Includes detailed bibliographic entries on published works; meticulous notes on biblical references used by Newman in his sermons; transcriptions of Newman's correspondence and archival records; as well as notes on contemporary accounts of Newman's preaching activities.

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