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Oral History Interview with Julie Mathien conducted by Ruth Belay

Julie Mathien, a long-time childcare reform advocate and former public servant, was an early member of the Campus Community Cooperative Daycare. Established in 1969, the collective developed the childcare centre at 12 Sussex Ave. at the St. George Campus of the University of Toronto. Mathien recounts her experiences as both a volunteer and staff member providing insight into the underlying philosophy, membership, and organization of the collective. She describes the history of negotiations and tensions with UofT’s administration, including what led to the 1969 occupation of Simcoe Hall, as well as the shifting media coverage on the centre. Mathien explains the evolving discourse on approaches to childcare that have been part of her research and later work with the municipal and provincial governments. The interview also covers Mathien’s work with the Huron-Sussex Residents Organization, where she describes past confrontations with the University and their jointly developed plans for the future of the neighborhood.

Organizations

  • Campus Community Cooperative Daycare Centre
  • Daycare Reform Action Alliance
  • Office of the President, University of Toronto
  • Canadian National Advocacy for Childcare
  • Toronto Board of Education
  • Province of Ontario
  • City of Toronto
  • University Planning, Design and Construction, University of Toronto
  • Huron-Sussex Residents Organization

Subject Topics

  • Child care
  • Early childhood education
  • Cooperatives and collective models
  • Protests and sit-ins
  • Women’s movement
  • Institutional response
  • Community engagement
  • Neighborhood advocacy
  • Toronto city planning and development

Oral history interview with James Nugent conducted by Ruth Belay

Dr. James Nugent, currently Lecturer at the University of Waterloo, received his undergraduate degree in 2006 from UTSC and continued with his graduate work at UofT’s St. George Campus. Nugent shares his early experiences of student activism and involvement at UTSC, particularly through Resources for Environmental and Social Action (RESA), while also reflecting on the larger societal and political shifts following 9/11. Nugent remarks on the unique student environment at UTSC, noting events, initiatives, as well as the cross-cultural learning he experienced there. In describing his participation in the anti-globalization movement and peace action, through to his later work on climate justice and social policy, Nugent discusses the impact of service learning and community engagement in education. He reflects on the pressures faced by current students and questions how these will shape youth activism, as well as considering the effects of social media and the breadth of issues in which students are engaged both here and abroad.

Organizations

  • Resources for Environmental & Social Action (RESA)
  • International Development Studies Association (IDSA)
  • University of Toronto Scarborough College (UTSC)
  • Grrl Fest, University of Toronto Scarborough College
  • The Meeting Place, University of Toronto Scarborough College

Subject Topics

  • Anti-globalization movement
  • Protests and demonstrations
  • Anti-war movement
  • International development studies
  • Fair trade
  • Climate / environmental justice
  • Community partnerships
  • Social media
  • International students

Oral history interview with Ikem Opara conducted by Ruth Belay

Ikem Opara, currently Director of National Learning Partnerships at the Rideau Hall Foundation, was an international student at UofT’s St. George campus. His active involvement at the University included executive roles with Black Students’ Association (BSA), playing Varsity football, and membership in organizations such as the Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity, the African Students’ Association and the Nigerian Students’ Association. Opara describes the personal impact that these organizations had in forming deep social connections, while emphasizing throughout the interview their commitment to create spaces of belonging on campus that reflected both racial and ethnic identities. He recounts many of the BSA’s and Alpha Phi Alpha’s activities, including mentorship initiatives, talks, social events, and discusses their underlying goals, particularly regarding the strategic use of space to highlight Black presence at the University. He reflects on the BSA’s engagement in issues such as representation within curriculum and broader community activism around police violence in the city, while also reflecting on challenges faced at UofT.

Organizations

  • Black Students’ Association (BSA)
  • High School Conference, Black Students’ Association
  • BLACKLIGHT, Black Students' Association
  • African Students’ Association (ASA)
  • Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. (AΦA)
  • Nigerian Students’ Association (NSA)
  • Tan Furu
  • UofT Korean Students’ Association (UTKSA)
  • Hart House, UofT

Subject Topics

  • Acculturation
  • Varsity sports
  • Mentorship
  • Equity in education
  • Community engagement
  • Solidarity networks
  • Social networks
  • Food
  • Organizational memory
  • Institutional response
  • Institutional racism
  • Funding of student groups

Oral history interview with Ceta Ramkhalawansingh conducted by Ruth Belay and Daniela Ansovini

Ceta Ramkhalawansingh is the former Equal Opportunity Director at the old City of Toronto, later becoming the Corporate Manager, Diversity Management and Community Engagement in the new City of Toronto after amalgamation in 1998. She is a prominent community activist and was a founding member of the student-initiated teaching collective at UofT in one of Canada’s first women’s studies course. Her family moved to Canada in 1967 from Trinidad and Tobago. Ceta reflects on her time as an undergraduate student from 1968, recounting her political involvement through the Student Administrative Council (SAC), and her work in establishing, participating in, and advocating for the inclusion of women’s studies and feminist methodologies in curriculum at the University. She discusses some of her positions at the City of Toronto and the Toronto school board, particularly around diversity and equity work, and her continuing connection with UofT through the Women and Gender Studies Institute, New College and Innis College. Ramkhalawansingh, as a dedicated community and housing advocate, also describes the negotiation and resistance to key developments in the neighborhoods surrounding UofT, particularly in the downtown Toronto Grange neighborhood, as well as the University’s position and response. She recalls a number of different groups and initiatives that she has been involved with, including on issues of heritage preservation and range of human rights issues.

Organizations

  • Women and Gender Studies Institute, University of Toronto (WGSI)
  • Student Administrative Council (SAC)
  • Labour History Collective and The Women’s Press
  • New College, University of Toronto
  • Innis College, University of Toronto
  • City of Toronto
  • Grange Community Association
  • University of Toronto Community Liaison Committee
  • Art Gallery of Ontario, AGO
  • MATCH International Women’s Fund
  • Ontario Advisory Council of Women’s Issues

Subject Topics

  • Student governance
  • Women and gender studies programmes
  • Social responsibility
  • Reproductive rights
  • Toronto city planning
  • Toronto development
  • Neighborhood advocacy
  • Heritage conservation
  • Social housing
  • Financial access to education
  • Institutional response
  • Equity, diversity, and human rights

Oral history interview with Dena Taylor conducted by Ruth Belay

Dr. Dena Bain Taylor, a retired faculty member in the Department of English at the University of Toronto, attended the University at its St. George campus as both an undergraduate and graduate student. While the interview touches on the early experiences Taylor had as a student, it focuses on the period between 1968 to 1973 when she was a resident of Rochdale College. She describes the foundation and structure of the residence, including identifying key individuals, concurrent initiatives, funding sources, and the external issues that shaped the residence. Throughout the interview, Taylor reflects on the philosophical underpinnings that were central to the collective ethos of the space and its genesis as a centre for experiential learning, activism, arts, spirituality, experimentation and place-making. The interview captures aspects of Rochdale’s impact, including the activities of involved individuals, the influence of American political thought, as well as the organizations and initiatives that were developed there. Taylor speaks to some of the issues that surfaced in the residence such as sexism, sexuality, and mental health, as well as how these issues were portrayed in the media. In discussing her own experiences and reflecting on the broader significance of the College, Taylor details and questions how the residence fundamentally challenged the status-quo.

Organizations

  • Rochdale College
  • Hart House, University of Toronto
  • Indian Institute
  • Campus Co-operative
  • Toronto Community Housing

Subject Topics

  • Experiential learning
  • Alternative education
  • Co-operative and collective models
  • Housing
  • Counter-culture
  • Arts
  • Back-to-the-land movement
  • Financial access to post-secondary education
  • Sexual freedom
  • Draft evasion
  • Spadina Expressway

Oral history interview with Bill Gardner conducted by Ruth Belay

Bill Gardner, CEO of CRM Dynamics, was a former University of Toronto student at the St. George Campus who was actively involved in student government from 1985 to 1989. Serving as president of both the Arts and Science Student Union (ASSU) and the Students’ Administrative Council (now the University of Toronto Students’ Union), Gardner discusses his focus on addressing concerns specifically relevant to UofT students, the dynamics present internally within both groups, as well his approach in working with the University’s administration, external groups and political figures. He touches on a number of issues and activities including frosh programming and planning, the production of the ASSU’s Anti-Calendar, and the adoption of digital technology at the University. Gardner reflects on his own career to highlight the benefits of the leadership experience he gained during this time, as well as the long-term effects of a shift away from student-led organizing within post-secondary institutions.

Organizations

  • Arts Science Student Union (ASSU)
  • Students’ Administrative Council (SAC)
  • Canadian Federation of Student (CFS)
  • Office of the President, University of Toronto
  • Investment Club, UofT
  • Economics Course Organization, UofT

Subject Topics

  • Student governance
  • Student fees
  • Student services
  • Student elections
  • Anti-Calendar
  • Institutional response
  • Frosh Week
  • Course unions
  • Changes in post-secondary education
  • Computerization and automation

Oral history interview with Kumaraswamy Ponnambalam conducted by Ruth Belay

Dr. Kumaraswamy Ponnambalam, currently a Professor in Systems Design Engineering at the University of Waterloo, graduated from the University of Toronto with his PhD in 1987. Dr. Ponnambalam shares his experiences as an international student, reflecting on what brought him to UofT and some of the challenges he faced in attending the University. In particular, he focuses on the financial and workload pressures placed on students. He recalls some of the support networks that were created on campus, both through social activities, for example through residence and the International Student Centre, academic collaboration, and demonstrations. These networks also extended outside of the University, in particular between Tamil-speaking communities. Dr. Ponnambalam describes the impact of differential fees as a UofT student and his continued response as he now observes the current financial barriers faced by international students. At the request of Dr. Ponnambalam, this oral history interview is dedicated to the memory of Dr. Sinnathurai Vijayakumar who played a profound role in Dr. Ponnambalam's life, particularly while at UofT.

Please note that this interview contains a racial slur used when Dr. Ponnambalam describes racial harassment he faced [approx. 00:22:15].

Organizations

  • International Student Centre, University of Toronto
  • Graduate Student Union (UTGSU)
  • University of Waterloo

Subject Topics

  • Differential student fees
  • Education affordability
  • International students
  • Canadian South Asian communities
  • Sri Lankan Tamil (Eelam) independence movement
  • Engineering
  • Student residence
  • Student labour
  • Academic hiring practices

Oral history interview with John Foster conducted by Ruth Belay

John Foster, Sessional Lecturer in International Studies and Justice Studies at the University of Regina, formerly in interdisciplinary studies, Carleton University, completed his graduate studies at the University of Toronto in the late 1960s (M.A., 1973, Ph.D. 1977). In his interview, Foster comments on how the growing social consciousness of the era shaped student organizing, protest movements, and interest in cooperative models. He discusses his early experiences with student activism both in Saskatchewan and Toronto, including with the Student Union for Peace Action (SUPA) and the Christian youth movement.

The interview focuses on his involvement in the establishment of accessible and affordable childcare at U of T that provided students and working parents with the necessary supports to pursue their education. Foster connects the founding of the Campus Community Cooperative Daycare Centre to the women’s movement, as well as with new and developing ideas around early childhood education. For example, the cooperative approach used at the daycare was challenged by the provincial government’s daycare branch who were critical of the model. Foster recalls key moments in the Cooperative’s history, including the sit-in at Simcoe Hall and occupation of 12 Sussex Ave., the second centre on Devonshire Place, his personal experiences as a parent-volunteer, and the coordination of member’s contributions to the collective.

Organizations

  • Campus Community Cooperative Daycare Centre
  • Student Union for Peace Action (SUPA)
  • United Church of Canada
  • Student Administrative Council (SAC)

Subject Topics

  • Child care
  • Early childhood education
  • Cooperatives and collective models
  • Peace movement
  • Women’s movement
  • Institutional response
  • Community engagement
  • Institutional response

Oral history interview with Sean Wharton conducted by Ruth Belay

Dr. Sean Wharton, Medical Director of the Wharton Medical Clinic, holds doctorates in Medicine and Pharmacy from the University of Toronto. Wharton discusses his early experiences at UofT, the underrepresentation of Black students in his courses, and how his growing interest in deconstructing systemic barriers drew him to the Association for the Advancement of Blacks in the Health Sciences (AABHS). Inspired by the Association’s success in providing mentorship and developing outreach initiatives, Wharton helped found the Black Medical Students Association (BMSA) in 2000. He recounts how support and allyship from AABHS, UofT administrators, such as Dr. Miriam Rossi, and fellow students was necessary in establishing the BMSA. Wharton describes the continued goals of the organization, including addressing financial barriers for students and the importance of BIPOC representation through all organizational levels and roles. In emphasizing the significance of building connections and community, he also details the BMSA’s engagement within Toronto schools and the growth of the organization nationally.

Organizations

  • Black Medical Student Association (BMSA)
  • Association for the Advancement of Blacks in the Health Sciences (AABHS)
  • Faculty of Medicine, UofT
  • Community of Support, UofT
  • Summer Mentorship Program, UofT
  • Visions of Science
  • Camp Jumoke

Subject Topics

  • Mentorship
  • Racial justice
  • Access to post-secondary education
  • Financial barriers to education
  • Equity in education
  • Community partnership
  • Institutional response
  • Solidarity networks

Oral history interview with Mohammed Hashim conducted by Ruth Belay

Mohammed Hashim, Executive Director of the Canadian Race Relations Foundation, was a former University of Toronto Mississauga (UTM) student actively involved in organizing and student government across UofT’s three campuses in the 2000s. Helping to found the group Breaking Down Social Barriers, an anti-globalization advocacy group, Hashim speaks about his entry into progressive politics and how his growing investment developed at the University. He describes how social justice and engagement with broader political struggles came to shape UTM student politics. Through reflection on the numerous positions he held, including on the Board of Directors of the Student Administrative Council, Commissioner at University Affairs and Executive Director at UTMSU, he touches on specific issues including rising student fees, the UPass programme, and dynamics between the three campuses. Hashim highlights the intentional work done to foster involvement and successive progressive slates, as well as the deliberate approaches taken by the University administration in responding to student issues.

Organizations

  • Breaking Down Social Barriers
  • University of Toronto Mississauga Students’ Union (UTMSU)
  • Student Administrative Council (SAC)
  • Canadian Federation of Students (CFE)
  • Scarborough Campus Students’ Union (SCSU)
  • Couchiching Institute on Public Affairs

Subject Topics

  • Anti-globalization movement
  • Days of Action, Ontario
  • 9/11
  • Student movements
  • Student governance
  • Student fees
  • Transit
  • Institutional response
  • Deregulation of professional programmes

Oral history interview with Norman Kwan conducted by Ruth Belay and Daniela Ansovini

Dr. Norman Kwan, a graduate from UofT’s Faculty of Dentistry, provides his account of student and community response to CTV’s W5 Campus Giveaway episode. Airing on September 30th, 1979, the reporting alleged that Canadian citizens were being denied opportunity in professional graduate programs and targeted students who were visible minorities as unfairly occupying these placements, regardless of their citizenship or status as Canadians themselves. The xenophobic tone and misrepresentation of foreign students ignited protests across the country. Dr. Kwan discusses his involvement in the student response, particularly how the Chinese Students’ Association’s President, Dinah Cheng, approached and worked with Chinese-Canadian professional associations and community groups to protest, pursue a lawsuit, and create a set of demands. He describes the impacts and outcomes of their advocacy including CTV’s apology, solidarity built between different groups, the creation of the Chinese Canadian National Council, and the shift in his own political consciousness.

Organizations

  • Chinese Students’ Association, University of Toronto
  • Canadian Television Network (CTV)
  • Ad Hoc Committee of the Council of Chinese Canadians Against W5
  • Council of Chinese Canadians (Ontario Chapter and Irene Chiu)
  • Federation of Chinese Canadian Professionals (FCCP)
  • Chinese Professional Association of Canada
  • New Democratic Party (NDP)

Subject Topics

  • Racism in the press
  • Discrimination in higher education
  • University admissions
  • Canadian race relations
  • Chinese Canadian activism
  • Chinese Canadian community
  • Professional graduate education
  • International students
  • Southeast Asian refugees
  • International students
  • Community organizing
  • W-Five

Oral history interview with Bonte Minnema conducted by Ruth Belay

Bonte Minnema, a digital media and marketing consultant, was an undergraduate student at the University of Toronto’s St. George Campus in the mid-1990s where he was actively involved in advocating for the LGBT community. Minnema shares some of his background growing up and coming out in southwestern Ontario, why he was drawn to UofT, and his initial experiences at Trinity College. He describes some of his involvement in equal rights activism taking place outside of the University, and then focuses on the start of his advocacy on campus. Initially looking at discrimination in the provision of student services, for example in UofT’s Health Services, and within curriculum, Minnema also describes the revival of a student organization aimed to build support and social infrastructure for LGBT students on campus. He recalls a number of different initiatives in both respects, as well as solidarity networks between different student groups, allies in various roles, and the dynamics of activism at the University. Minnema reflects on the complex and continued impact that activism has had through his career, how he has navigated the public persona that developed with this, and the type of social value he sees in activist perspectives and approach.

Organizations

  • LGBTOUT
  • Coalition for Lesbian and Gay Rights in Ontario
  • Centre for Women and Trans People, UofT
  • Ontario Public Interest Research Group (OPIRG)
  • Muslim Students’ Association
  • Mark S. Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies
  • Health and Wellness – Student Life, UofT
  • Nobel Knights

Subject Topics

  • UofT Sexual Diversity Program
  • Homo Hops
  • Positive Space Campaign
  • Equity and inclusion in curriculum
  • Homophobia
  • Solidarity networks
  • Student health services
  • Financial barriers
  • Scholarships
  • Privacy

Oral history interview with Tom Mathien conducted by Ruth Belay

Dr. Thomas Mathien is the former Associate Director of the Transitional Year Programme (TYP) at the University of Toronto and an occasional course instructor in the UofT's Department of Philosophy. His interview primarily focuses on key developments of the TYP, though Mathien also recounts some of his early participation as a student in teach-ins, student government, and various collective initiatives in late 1960s and 1970s. Mathien describes the history of the TYP, noting early confrontations with the University, key individuals involved, and the programme’s role in supporting access to post-secondary education that is rooted in a recognition of the impacts of racial, economic, and cultural difference that students experience at the University. He speaks at length about shifts in the programme's curricular, pedagogical, and community-based approaches that have been adopted and developed over a span of 30 years. For example, he notes the interest in including Indigenous knowledge in curriculum, as well as initiatives to help support the financial security of students. Mathien ends the interview reflecting on the educators who influenced his own political thought and approach.

For additional information on the Transitional Year Programme please see Access and Equity in the University: A Collection of Papers from the 30th Anniversary Conference of the Transitional Year Programme, University of Toronto / Ed. Keren Braithwaite Organizations

Organizations

  • Transitional Year Program, University of Toronto
  • Campus Community Cooperative Daycare Centre
  • Student Union for Peace Action
  • Students’ Administrative Council
  • Innis College, University of Toronto
  • University of St. Michael’s College, University of Toronto

Subject Topics

  • Community education
  • Equity in education
  • Community engagement
  • Access to post-secondary educatio
  • Financial barriers to post-secondary education
  • Collective models
  • Indigenous curriculum
  • Institutional response

Oral history interview with Mary Anne Chambers conducted by Ruth Belay

Mary Anne Chambers, former Ontario Member of Provincial Parliament (2003 – 2007) and Senior Vice-President of Scotiabank, completed her degree at the University of Toronto Scarborough in 1988. In the interview, Chambers highlights the impact that the University has had on her life while pursuing her academic and professional interests. She gives examples from various points in her career, including the support she received from students as she ran for the Legislative Assembly and the opportunities that she created as a UofT donor and member of Governing Council. Chambers shares in detail some of the initiatives that she has led and supported at UofT, in particular the Imani Academic Mentorship Program, which aims to address systemic barriers that create disproportionate access to post-secondary education. She connects this work to how she sees her role as an advocate and her deep commitment to the East Scarborough community, as well as broadly discussing the positive impacts of community involvement and giving back.

Organizations

  • University of Toronto Scarborough (UTSC)
  • Governing Council – UofT
  • Academic Resource Centre – UTSC
  • Imani Academic Mentorship Program
  • Government of Ontario
  • Black Students’ Association, UTSC

Subject Topics

  • Mature students
    • Mentorship
    • Accessibility of post-secondary education
    • Racial justice
    • Financial barriers to education
    • Community partnership
    • Community involvement
    • Equity in education
    • Philanthropy

Oral history interview with June Larkin conducted by Ruth Belay and Daniela Ansovini

Dr. June Larkin, former Director of Equity Studies and professor in the Women and Gender Studies Department, completed her graduate studies at Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) in 1993. Larkin describes her involvement in the creation of OISE’s Sexual Harassment Caucus, a group formed to address sexual harassment at the institution through policy and education. With seventeen years of prior experience as an elementary school teacher, Larkin shares how this advocacy shifted her doctoral work to focus on sexual harassment in high schools and also led to developing educational toolkits and workshops to support school boards looking to implement their own policies. In discussing her research, community-based initiatives, and teaching, she reflects on the definition of activism and many forms it can take. Within the context of the Equity Studies Program more broadly, she notes the ways in which she and other professors have worked to respond to the shifting interest of students, particularly to support their engagement in issues at and beyond the University.

Organizations

  • Ontario Institute of Studies for Education (OISE)
  • Sexual Harassment Caucus, OISE
  • Sexual Harassment Resistors Everywhere (SHREW)
  • Equity Studies Program, New College, University of Toronto
  • Women and Gender Studies Institute, University of Toronto

Subject Topics

  • Women’s movement and feminism
  • Sexual harassment policy
  • Violence against women
  • Equity in education
  • Intersectionality
  • Equity Studies
  • Sexual health
  • Community engagement
  • Institutional response
  • Occupy! Movement
  • Activist scholarship

Oral history interview with Ike Okafor conducted by Ruth Belay

Ike Okafor, currently the Senior Officer for Service Learning and Diversity Outreach at the University of Toronto’s (UofT) Faculty of Medicine, was a founding member and former President of the Black Student Association (BSA) at UofT. In the interview, Okafor provides a rich account of community and advocacy work aimed to specifically address systemic barriers to higher education for Black students. He discusses his experiences seeing the under-representation of Black students at UofT, the founding of the BSA in 1999, and re-establishment of the Fourth Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha. He speaks to the dual interests of these groups: to create community and support access to post-secondary education, and describes how these aims were supported through the activities of a number of closely aligned initiatives.

Okafor describes how his later professional roles at UofT, in the Office of Student Recruitment and the Faculty of Medicine, have focused on leveraging the institution’s resources to better support and attract a diverse student body. He discusses the role of public institutions and the necessary urgency to recognize the social contract by which they are underpinned. This reorientation would emphasize responsibility of public bodies to significantly serve the public, require collaboration with community partners, and meaningfully support equity objectives.

Organizations

  • Black Students’ Association (BSA)
  • Annual Black High School Conference, Black Students’ Association
  • National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE)
  • New College – University of Toronto
  • Black Medical Student Association (BMSA)
  • Huron-Sussex Residents Organization
  • Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. (AΦA)
  • Tan Furu
  • Black Business and Professional Association (BBPA)
  • Toronto District School Board (TDSB)

Subject Topics

  • Mentorship
  • Racial justice
  • Access to post-secondary education
  • Fraternities
  • Equity in education
  • Discrimination in education
  • Community partnership
  • Institutional transformation
  • Institutional response

Correspondence/subject files

Series consists of the subject and correspondence files of the Registrar and the Associate Registrar and cover the main activities of the office such as providing services to students, planning and organizing events including convocations and installations, administering scholarships and awards as well as acting as secretary to the Senate. The series is broken down into the following sub-series:
Sub-series 1: Academic year files, 1913-1981
Sub-series 2: Administration and General Files
Sub-series 3: Records related to Awards, Scholarships, Bursaries and Medals
Sub-series 4: Installation and Convocation Files
Sub-series 5: Records related to Admissions, Enrolment and Graduation
Sub-series 6: Special Events
Sub-series 7: Student Programs
Sub-series 8: Records related to the Board and Senate

2018-2019 concert season

Series consists of recordings of events hosted by the Faculty of Music during the 2018-2019 concert season including faculty, student, and guest artists as well as ongoing concert series and faculty ensembles.

Correspondence and programs

Series consists of correspondence with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC), Canadian Music Centre (CMC), Canada Council, Ontario Arts Council, performers, representatives of performing organizations, friends, and colleagues. The series also contains programs, Polish community activities, press notices and reviews, and notebooks and journals.

Organizational records

Records document the foundation's mandate, activities, and history. They include the foundation's logo creation, "foundational statement", historic timeline, press cuttings, and newsletters.

Correspondence – General

This major series within the fonds documents Prof. Russell’s academic career at the University of Toronto. Correspondence consists mainly of incoming letters from University of Toronto faculty, colleagues, judges, provincial and federal politicians, editors, students, and friends, discussing mostly professional and academic activities relating to teaching, research and publications. This series begins during his period as Associate Professor in the Department of Political Economy and includes correspondence relating to his such activities as research fellowship at Harvard University, acting principal and later principal of Innis College, visiting professorship at Makerere University in Uganda, visiting fellowships at Osgoode Hall, York University, Australian National University, and European University Institute, Fiesole, Italy. Correspondents include Bob Rae, Martin Friedland, Stefan Dupré, James Lorimer, Meric Gertler, and Justice D.C. McDonald.

This series also includes some correspondence relating to Prof. Russell’s role as director of research for the Royal Commission of Inquiry into Certain Activities of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, (McDonald Commission). This commission was established in 1977 following allegations of crimes by the RCMP Security Service.

Press

Series consists of Prof. Russell’s commentary and appearances in the media. Material includes opinion pieces, editorials, and responses to a number of national issues including the prorogation of Parliament (2008-2009), minority governments, nuclearization, the long-gun registry, and judicial appointments. Series also includes records related to interviews given on television and radio in both Canada and Australia.

Services

Series D, Services, covers the years 1949 and 1952 through 2009. The university provides many services for faculty, staff, and students. The series is has been arranged base on the department providing services (i.e. the library); some smaller service providers are grouped together based on a common target audience (i.e. faculty and staff organizations). The series is divided into ten subseries.

Promotional events and free concerts

Series consists of records pertaining to various promotional events and free concerts produced by the Aldeburgh Connection. The series includes materials for one concert by Stephen Ralls and Bruce Ubukata prior to the official formation of the Aldeburgh Connection concert series, “Opera in the Drawing Room” (January 14, 1979). Each file consists of programs, scripts, scores annotated by Ralls and Ubukata, set and lighting designs, posters, and reviews.

Professional activities (other)

This series documents professional activities other than those described in the two previous series. Included is material on consulting and special projects, boards of governors of educational institutions that Professor Lang sat on, and his association with a number of other educational agencies and groups in Canada and elsewhere. Of the last, the most documentation is on the Ontario Council on University Affairs, the Premier’s Council for Economic Renewal, and the Sweden/Ontario Bilateral Exchange Seminar for Senior Academic Administrators (1982-1983). The arrangement in this section is by name of organization or event.

The files may contain any combination of correspondence, memoranda, minutes of meetings, notes, and reports.

Files from B2018-0001 include further records documenting Lang’s active involvement with the Board of Trustees of the Toronto School of Theology (2008 - ; Chair, Institutional Evaluations Committee, 2014-2017) and the Board of Governors of Saint Augustine’s Seminary. His work as Chair of the Strategic Asset Study Committee (2011-2014) for the Archdiocese of Toronto is also documented.

Professional activities: Council of Ontario Universities

The Council of Ontario Universities (COU) was formed on December 3, 1962 as the “Committee of Presidents of Provincially Assisted Universities and Colleges of Ontario,” with its current name being adopted in 1971. The mandate of the COU is to “build awareness of the university sector’s contributions to the social, economic and cultural well-being of the province and the country, as well as the issues that impact the sector’s ability to maximize these contributions.” It works with Ontario’s publicly assisted universities and one associate member institution, the Royal Military College of Canada. This series documents the activities of a number of its committees and task forces, which are detailed below, approximately in order of activity.

Professor Lang was a member of the COU’s Committee on Enrolment Statistics and Projections from 1976 to 1990. In 1982-1983 he sat on its Special Committee on BILD Administrative Procedures and from 1987 to 1991 was a member of its Research Advisory Group. In 1991 he was invited to be part of a small task force to present proposals to the government for an income contingent repayment plan for Ontario students. Throughout much of the 1990s, he was involved with the COU’s Committee on University Accountability and the Performance Indicators for the Public Postsecondary System in Ontario project, better known as the Performance Indicators Project, the purpose of which was to assess the overall Ontario postsecondary sector.

He was also a member of four task forces: Audit Guidelines (1998-2000), Secondary School Issues (1998-2005), Student Financial Assistance (2006-), and Quality Assurance (2008-2010).
The Task Force on Secondary School Issues was established to assess the evaluation of students in the new secondary school program of studies and to make recommendations regarding the monitoring of grading practices and standards.

The COU’s Quality and Productivity Task Force work was to outline “all the quality and productivity initiatives” undertaken to “showcase results for the government’s increased investment in universities.” Its report, presented in March 2006, was followed by the COU Task Force on Quality Measurements, chaired by David Naylor of the University of Toronto. It was charged with addressing the “broad issues related to quality measurement, developing the long-term strategies for COU’s work with the government and the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario (HEQCO).” [1]

Files in B2018-0001 include correspondence with U of T and COU colleagues, as well as further records related to his role on the COU’s Committee on University Accountability. Also included are further records about the COU's Task Force on Quality Assurance (2008-2010), including its subsequent transition and implementation phase.

The files in this series contain correspondence, memoranda, notes, minutes of meetings, drafts of reports, and assorted background reports and other documentation.

NOTES

  1. Task Force on Quality Measurement terms of reference, March 2006, in B2011-0003/043(03).

Compositions

Series consists of manuscript music and scores for Buczynski's radio music and children's pieces.

2017-2018 concert season

Series consists of recordings of events hosted by the Faculty of Music during the 2017-2018 concert season including faculty, student, and guest artists as well as ongoing concert series and faculty ensembles.

Correspondence – Individuals

This series relates closely to Series 3, but reflects the original arrangement of the personal records of Prof. Russell. This series consists of two subseries: correspondence in separate files by name of correspondent and letters of reference for former students and colleagues both nationally and internationally. Correspondents include, among others, Donald Smiley, Peter Jull, Eugene Forsey, Ian Greene, Justice D.C. McDonald, Ann Rees, Denis Stairs, James Thomson, James Tully, and Frances Widdowson.

Personal Correspondence

This series contains personal correspondence with family and friends.

B2009-0010 contains her correspondence home to her parents while a student at Smith College and during one year at the University of Geneva (1951-1955)

B2019-0015 contains correspondence with her family in the 1960s-1980s and with Jim through the 1980s and 1990s. It also includes letters of condolence and letters written to Alison about Jim at his death.

Professional activities: Ontario. Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities

Professor Lang’s first major collaboration with the then Ministry of Colleges and Universities began in 1991 when he was a member of the Minister’s Task Force on University Accountability. Later he was involved in several joint projects with the Ministry and its successors [the Ministry of Education and Training (from 1995) and from 2000, the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities] and the Council of Ontario Universities; in particular, their Steering Committee on Ontario Graduate Survey (1997-), their Joint Steering Committee on OSAP (1998-2001), and their Key Performance Indicators project (2000-2005). In 2006 he became a member of the Ministry’s Joint Working Group on Student Access Guarantee. From 2008 to 2011 he was the Ministry’s Working Group and Steering Committee on Transfer. Not all of these activities are documented in this series.

In 2006-2007 the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities undertook two inter-related research projects “aimed generally at learning about the characteristics of ‘first-generation’ students.” The first, “College Choice”, focused on the factors that influenced students in seeking post-secondary education and their choices of institutions to attend. The second, dubbed Project STAR (Student Achievement and Retention), “sought to determine the factors that influence the academic performance and retention of students in the first year of university.” It was sponsored by the Canada Millenium Scholarship Foundation and Statistics
Canada.

Files in B2018-0001 document Professor Lang's role as Special Advisor to the Deputy Minister, in particular his involvement with the negotiations between the Government of Ontario and Ontario universities regarding the second Strategic Mandate Agreement (SMA2), and Ontario colleges regarding the Colleges Applied Research and Development Fund [CARDF].

Also included are files regarding the creation of a francophone university in Ontario; the Joint Working Group on Student Access Guarantee, regarding the modernization of the Ontario Student Assistance Program (OSAP); and the Steering Committee on Transfer Credits.

Compositions

Series consists of original manuscripts and copies of manuscripts, including both scores and parts, for compositions composed or arranged by John Beckwith.

Governance and finance records

Series consists of the administrative and financial records of the Aldeburgh Connection, including newsletters; correspondence regarding private donations, corporate funding, and government grants; financial ledgers and budgets; and, board minutes. As a registered charity, the Aldeburgh Connection was dependent upon donations, funding, and grants, in addition to revenue from ticket sales, to support each concert season. Donations after the end of the Aldeburgh Connection concerts in 2013 were given in support of the organization’s archival project, which included the creation of an online archive of sound recordings, digitized programs, and a database of their performance repertoire. The series also includes the letters of incorporation for “The Aldeburgh Connection Concert Society” and early promotional material used to obtain funding.

Gila Margolin, personal

This series is divided into two main categories:

The first contains copies of Gila Margolin's family tree (Margolin and Bergson), as well as a copy of a family photograph.

The second contains ephemera from Margolin's travels (brochures, tickets, a tote), and correspondence.

Canadian Society for Renaissance Studies

Series consists of records of the Seiziémistes Canadiens meetings ; the CSRS Annual General Meetings and executive meetings including minutes and agendas ; the Canadian Federation for the Humanities records ; CSRS newsletters and bulletins ; financial records ; records from the annual conference ; membership records ; correspondence ; directories ; records of the Secretary-Treasurer and the President, as well as other Renaissance associations' records.

Canadian Society for Renaissance Studies

Biographical

This small series includes documentation on Jim Prentice’s early life including his attendance at the Gang Ranch in 1936, his time at Royal Road Military College in the 1940s and his involvement with the Naval Reserves in British Columbia in the 1950s. There is also a certificate, arm band and medal documenting his involvement in the World Master Games in 2005 and 2006. Throughout his life, Prentice established several scholarships and awards which are documented here. He also documented in note or essay form his family history. Finally, this series also includes a copy of his C.V., his Ph.D. diploma, his obituary and a short biography written by Alison Prentice

Professional activities and addresses

Files included from accession B2005-0001 within this series document Prof. Russell’s activities in various conferences and associations both nationally and internationally. Prof. Russell’s level of involvement ranged from regular membership activities to participating in various committees, presenting papers, and conference planning. He was also the subject of “Ideas in Action: a conference (essays) on politics and law in honour of Peter Russell” sponsored by Innis College, University of Toronto in 1996. Also documented in this series is Prof. Russell’s involvement with the Royal Society of Canada, primarily as Co-Foreign Secretary from 1996-2001, and as President of the Canadian Political Science Association during 1990 and 1991. Files contain correspondence, notes, minutes of meetings, manuscripts of papers, reports, and other material.

Files included in this series from the accession B2017-0006 and B2019-0008 document Prof. Russell’s professional activity, primarily representing addresses and presentations given. These cover a period from the mid-1990s to the late 2010s. The series also documents some administrative functions including conference organization.

Articles, reviews, published addresses and referee comments

This series contains records documenting Prof. Russell’s extensive production of both published and unpublished works including articles, papers, reviews, informal talks and addresses. Published articles were produced primarily for scholarly journals and document his specialized knowledge on Canada’s Supreme Court, the Charter of Rights and Canadian constitution, aboriginal rights both in Canada and Australia, commentaries for national media such as the Toronto Star and Globe and Mail, and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC).

Talks and addresses from accession B2005-0001 include his speeches on receiving honorary degrees at University of Guelph (1998) and University of Toronto (2001) as well as invited talks to private business such as the Canadian Club, Royal Trust, Toronto Club, as well as universities and other academic institutions in Canada and abroad.

Also included are his commentaries as referee for various manuscripts submitted by other writers for publication. Files predominantly contain drafts of manuscripts, notes, and correspondence, as well as photocopies of related materials.

Other correspondence

Series consists of personal and professional correspondence, including letters from and to many Canadian musicians and composers.

Concerts and Events

This series is divided into two main categories:

The first contains audio recordings of Gila Margolin's concerts, music sheets and lyrics from her performances, and an audio recording by Jeffrey Houghton which depicts the origins of The Little Sisters of Joy.

The second contains promotional materials from events, mainly concerts and book launches. In many cases, concerts are given in the framework of book launches.

Photographs

Photographs document Gila Margolin's travels, friends, family, and concert performances.

Photographers credited throughout. Note that Kevin Low photographed all of the prints in the album.

The Mike

This series consists of volumes of The Mike, the official student newspaper of the University of St. Michael’s College. The newspaper has been in operation since 1947 and has been published on a predominantly bi-weekly basis.

University of Toronto. Administrative activities

This series provides partial documentation Professor Lang’s years as a senior administrator at the University of Toronto. It begins with correspondence, primarily with President Connell, and related material regarding the Ontario Commission on the Future Development of the Universities of Ontario (the Bovey Commission), followed by later correspondence (to 1990) with him. The subsequent correspondence files end in 2010, some of which are contained on 3.5 inch floppy disks.

Professor Lang’s “general files” and “miscellaneous projects” begin with two major controversial decisions, the first being the closure of the Faculty of Food Sciences (1974) and the proposed closure of the Faculty of Architecture and Landscape Architecture (1986), with only the first being realized. The remainder of this subseries focuses on capital plans and budgeting, primarily responsibility centre budgeting as applied to Scarborough College. There are also files on Maclean’s magazine university and college surveys from the 1990s. The admission surveys from the last quarter of the 20th century also include a Maclean’s survey.

In the mid-1990s the University introduced a new electronic students’ records system (ROSI) with leadership provided by the Registrars Group. It is well documented here. Professor Lang’s activities as a senior policy advisor to the President of the University of Toronto are also documented but only for the years 2005 to 2007.

Professor Lang maintained extensive files on campus development plans and building projects from the mid-1960s to the late 1990s relating to all three campuses, including several on the Southwest Campus. There are also proposals to provide land for a new headquarters building for the Municipality of Metropolitan Toronto (1982) and facilities for the abortive bid to hold the summer Olympics in Toronto in 1996.

B2011-0003 ends with several proposals for an innovations centre and an industrial research centre at the University in the decade from the mid-1980s.

B2018-0001 includes further files related to his role as Senior Policy Advisor to David Naylor, a role in which he served until 2012. Also included are arbitration briefs and notes about a dispute between the Faculty Association and the University in 1986-1987, regarding mandatory retirement for professors.

Digital files include email correspondence with several Government of Ontario and U of T officials; files about the Maclean’s survey; and files (notes, briefts, reports) about the expansion of the number of graduate students at the University of Toronto.

The sub-titles in this series are those used by Professor Lang in his original box list. The files contain correspondence, memoranda, notes, and reports, Also included are compact discs containing certain files of correspondence and reports. The arrangement is generally by categories and chronolgically within each, with like materials grouped together.

Records relating to Victoria University

Series consists of meeting minutes, policies and procedures, planning documents, correspondence, reports and other records, 1968-2015, related to a range of University activities and administrative functions. Includes University acts, records related to human resources, health and safety, the management of administrative departments, the Victoria Women's Association, the Archives and institutions including the Bader Theatre, the Centre for Renaissance and Reformation Studies (CRRS) and the Records of Early English Drama (REED). Series also includes records related to buildings and properties owned by the University, to student residences, and exchanges as well as the official visits of the President to various institutions.

The series also contains congratulatory messages to Presidents upon their appointments, including messages to Professor Paul W. Gooch on his installation as President in 2001 and to Professor William Robins on his installation in 2015.

Biographical

B2008-0023 consists of resumes, short biographical notes and activity reports documenting Prof. Rayside.

B2013-0015 consists of records from Prof. Rayside’s time as a university student, with most material documenting his undergraduate degree at Carleton University. This series contains correspondence, notes, drafts, submitted essays, press clippings, photographs and application forms documenting both his academic work and his extra-curricular activities including student council, the Political Science Student Union, the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Teaching and Learning and his work on the student residence constitution. Files are arranged chronologically by degree, and by activity within each degree, with academic coursework at the front and extra-curricular activities at the back. There is one file at the beginning of the series containing souvenirs unrelated to his early education.

B2017-0024 includes two short biographies on David Rayside, one of which was a contribution to MyOntario in 2017.

University Administration

This series documents Prof. Rayside’s varied administrative positions. Files contain original correspondence and e-mails, notes, reports, minutes of meetings, and in specific cases conference programs and posters.

Records for this series found in B1998-0029 document mainly conferences organized by Prof. Rayside in his capacity as a university administrator for both the Canadian Studies Committee (1982-1984) and the European Studies Committee of the International Studies Committee (1976-1985). These include: The Individual and the State (1979), Small Town in Modern Times,(1983), 1984 in Canada: Authority, Conformity and the Policing of Citizens” (1983) The Sharon Temple and the Children of Peace”(1984), and Between Ourselves: Women’s Experiences at the University of Toronto, (1985).

Records for this series found in B2008-0023 document his role on several other committees including the Women’s’ Study Committee, Committee to establish the Equity Studies Program, New College, Vice Provost, Students Advisory Search Committee (2002), Graduate Affairs Committee, as well as several smaller committees and advisory roles. There are also three files related to his position as Vice Principal of University College.

The records for this series found in B2013-0015 document Professor Rayside’s course evaluation activities, conference organizing activities, and activities he would have performed as Acting Principal and Graduate Director including dealing with a teaching assistant strike, staffing the Political Science Department, and evaluating the graduate program in Political Science. These records also document his participation in the Diversity Working Group, Teaching Load Committee, and Principal’s Search Committee, among others. There is also a large amount of material related to creating community relations newsletters for the Department of Political Science and a collection of posters documenting conferences Prof. Rayside helped organize including : The Individual and the State (1979), Small Town in Modern Times,(1983), 1984 in Canada: Authority, Conformity and the Policing of Citizens” (1983) The Sharon Temple and the Children of Peace”(1984), and Between Ourselves: Women’s Experiences at the University of Toronto, (1985).

Records in accession B2017-0024 document Professor Rayside’s on-going involvement in the Mark S. Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies for the time period after he was director. Included are various committee files relating to public relations, curriculum and program development, budget and fundraising. There are several files documenting Raysides involvement in the World Pride Human Rights Conference 2014. There is also one box of records for the Department of Political Science, mainly relating to awards and scholarships.

Conferences, Talks, Unpublished Papers

Records in this series include notes, drafts, correspondence and flyers related to conferences Professor Rayside attended and/or participated in, unpublished talks and workshops, and unpublished papers, as well as less formal writing. The conferences documented mostly pertain to equity issues faced by gay and lesbian populations. The talks and workshops relate to a variety of topics including political science, labour unions, gendered violence, philanthropy and diversity in the workplace and were delivered mostly at Canadian universities in the form of symposia, guest lectures and public lectures. The unpublished papers in this series relate mainly to equity issues in Canadian and American society. There is also one sound recording of Professor Rayside delivering the Kreeft Lecture on November 28, 2002.

Records in B2017-0024 included talks, panels, and conferences on subjects such as inclusion, religion in the public sphere and positive space. There is also a paper he gave at Spring Reunion in 2016 as well as a memorial for colleagues Stephen Clarkson and David Higgs.

University of Toronto

At the time of his appointment as full professor in 1968, Prof. Russell was also appointed as Acting Principal of Innis College. He was appointed principal in 1971 for a period of 5 years. He was also Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Political Science from 1987-1993.

Records from accession B2005-0001 in this series document these appointments. In addition to these official administrative duties, this series also documents his involvement in other campus committees such as the December Study Group, an informal association of faculty members which met to discuss ‘matters of common interest’ among which was the development of academic programs in the Faculty of Arts and Science. Its first meeting was held in December, 1965. The establishment of this group coincided with the expected growth of enrolment at the University of Toronto during next few years. Included in this file is their response to the MacPherson Committee (the Presidential Advisory Committee on Undergraduate Instruction in the Faculty of Arts and Science) in 1967. Other files include the Library Users Committee (1965), the U of T Residence Plan (1959-1961).

Records from B2017-0006 and B2019-0008 in this series further document Prof. Russell’s involvement in various UofT committees, such as the Manuscript Advisory Committee for the University of Toronto Press, the Group on Indigenous Government, the Project Planning Committee for the Seniors Centre, and the Faculty Club.

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