Newell, Richard

Identity area

Type of entity

Person

Authorized form of name

Newell, Richard

Parallel form(s) of name

Standardized form(s) of name according to other rules

Other form(s) of name

  • King Biscuit Boy
  • Richard Newell

Identifiers for corporate bodies

Description area

Dates of existence

1944-2003

History

Richard Newell, professionally known as King Biscuit Boy, was born and raised in Hamilton Ontario. He is considered Canada’s greatest blues musician, and has a reputation as being a one of the best internationally.

As a child, Newell began to play the harmonica after discovering the instrument from a song heard on the radio. Playing the instrument every day, his skills quickly grew. His musical career began in 1961 as a member of the band the Barons. In 1963, he formed Son Richard & The Chessmen, then later replaced Ritchie Knight in The Mid Kinghts. In 1965 he formed Son Richard and The Gooduns. By 1969, Newell had joined Ronnie Hawkins (and his backup band the Hawks) and formed And Many Others. Hawkins became an important person in Newell’s life; it was Hawkins that dubbed Newell King Biscuit Boy, after the blues radio program “King Biscuit Flour Hour” in Arkansas.

Newell’s musical career was always changing. In 1970 he and Hawkins fired the backup band and formed Crowbar. This only lasted the year, though Newell would continue to do guest appearances with the band. Newell began a solo career, releasing six records as a solo artist, and many more as part of a collaboration or as a guest. Newell found international praise and success, in fans with such names as Janis Joplin, Joe Cocker, Paul McCartney, and Keith Richard. Newell had battled alcoholism most of his adult life and passed away in 2003 at his home in Hamilton Ontario.

Places

Hamilton, Ontario

Legal status

Functions, occupations and activities

Mandates/sources of authority

Internal structures/genealogy

General context

Relationships area

Access points area

Occupations

Control area

Authority record identifier

Institution identifier

Rules and/or conventions used

Status

Draft

Level of detail

Dates of creation, revision and deletion

Created August 15, 2019

Language(s)

  • English

Script(s)

Sources

Erskine, Evelyn. “New band, but King Biscuit Boy still playing the blues.” The Ottawa Citizen, November 28, 1986. https://search-proquest-com.myaccess.library.utoronto.ca/docview/239023826/abstract/20920A5619E8453CPQ/1?accountid=14771

Krewen, Nick. “King Biscuit Boy revives career: Blues artist admits output has been sporadic, in part, because 'I'm lazy'.” The Record Kitchener, March 17, 1995. https://search-proquest-com.myaccess.library.utoronto.ca/docview/275403494?pq-origsite=summon&accountid=14771

Mahoney, Jeff. “King Biscuit Boy sang the blues.” Toronto Star, January 7, 2003. https://search-proquest-com.myaccess.library.utoronto.ca/docview/438573513?pq-origsite=summon&accountid=14771

“Musician's career spanned 40 years; Hamilton's legendary blues musician King Biscuit Boy dead at 59.” The Times Moncton, January 8, 2003. https://search-proquest-com.myaccess.library.utoronto.ca/docview/422869235/abstract/7E65CDBBBF6F45B9PQ/1?accountid=14771

Mowat, Bruce. “God save the King Biscuit Boy.” The Hamilton Spectator, March 9, 1995. https://search-proquest-com.myaccess.library.utoronto.ca/docview/269767863?pq-origsite=summon&accountid=14771

Nygaard King, Betty. “King Biscuit Boy.” The Canadian Encyclopedia. Last updated December 9, 2013. https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/king-biscuit-boy-emc

Rockingham, Graham. “Kelly Jay remembers King Biscuit Boy.” The Hamilton Spectator, May 31, 2007. https://search-proquest-com.myaccess.library.utoronto.ca/docview/270272347?pq-origsite=summon&accountid=14771

Maintenance notes

  • Clipboard

  • Export

  • EAC